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Thread: Varience in Bullet weight

  1. #1

    Varience in Bullet weight

    I recently bought a set of electronic scales which I would think is a more accurate method of weighing powder than balance scales. I was reloading Hornady 129 SST for my 6.5. Out of curiousity I took a sample of 10 heads and weighed each. The lightest was 129.2 and the heaviest 129.5. I then tried a sample of 10 Midway Dogtown 55gr .22 heads that I reload for my .22-250. Each weighed exactly 55gr.

    In terms of shooting deer the slight varience in the weight of the SST's makes no difference but in terms of measuring distance to lands in thous and weighing powder to within .005gr what difference does this make to precise accuracy.

  2. #2
    Probably none. In a laboratory sense it might, but in reality, none. Besides, how do you know which part of the bullet is accounting for the .3 grains of weight difference? It might be the jacket, it might be the lead. There is nothing to make you think that the .3 grains is changing ogival length, right? There are far more important things to worry about anyhow, such as case volume, ignition uniformity, neck tension; the list goes on and on...~Muir

    (Do you really measure powder to five one thousandths of a grain?? Or five tenths of a grain? In which case, the bullet variance is less than the powder weight variance and in all probability would cancel each other out!)
    Last edited by Muir; 19-11-2012 at 13:24.

  3. #3
    Tiny differences in the weight of a charge or projectile makes only small variations of velocity or impact point at the target.
    The greatest error is that of feeble man himself which is one reason many only fire a 2 or 3 shot group to test their loads.

    True indication can only be assessed with a larger numerical sample.

    HWH.

  4. #4
    someone once argued that when you practice you should shoot, say a round of 5 shots, always marking the cold bore, and the other 4 separately, then next time overlay a clean sheet of paper on top, and then another, and another, and another, and finally over time you will start to see (on the last page in the series - well the original FIRST page) what the true grouping ability of you and your rifle is from a certain position. if you did this off the bench in controlled conditions you would see the rifles true grouping ability with the only real variance your reloading skills. if you did it in field positions you would obviously have a lot more variables, but you would start to see a true picture of how you generally perform with your chosen load, field positions, field conditions, and rifle.

    if I had more time on my hands I would love to do such an experiment, but these days I'm just too bored punching holes in paper, I prefer the following: cans, tins, balloons, watermellons, apples, oranges, and my all time favourite, the coconut :-)

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by stag1933 View Post
    Tiny differences in the weight of a charge or projectile makes only small variations of velocity or impact point at the target.
    The greatest error is that of feeble man himself which is one reason many only fire a 2 or 3 shot group to test their loads.

    True indication can only be assessed with a larger numerical sample.

    HWH.
    Not always.
    I have shot in competitions where only one shot is fired at a single bull but must be repeated 10 times to complete the string. A rifle that punches the center of each target all ten times needs no larger sample. My 6.5x55 gets fired in three shot groups, as does my Hornet, because I seldom fire more then one shot without a rest. The thing is, and I hope you'll see that I am in really in concurrence with your thought, I fire waaaay more than ONE three shot group. I have fired dozens of them from the 6.5 and the same from the Hornet. All are consistently accurate. I don't feel the need to fire more rounds-per-group to verify the load as accurate.

    Now my 308? I have fired 20 round groups with that, but it is used for a different purpose and my thought is to test barrel and bedding (along with my focus) more than the load itself.~Muir

  6. #6
    My thoughts were based on a five shot group not a string of 10 or more.


    HWH.

  7. #7
    I was told I need to get out more.......

    Couple of reloading questions please.

    Results on page 2 of the thread
    Last edited by Eyefor; 19-11-2012 at 16:51.
    Handle every stressful situation like a dog. If you can't eat it, hump it or learn from it then piss on it and walk away.

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  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by stag1933 View Post
    My thoughts were based on a five shot group not a string of 10 or more.


    HWH.
    I figured as much. I was just saying that if your rifle can fire many, many lesser groups of identical size, then it might not be necessary. That said, a two shot group is really odd, as is the gaining-popularity four shot group; or they seem so to me, at least. Still, if you can shoot repeated 2 or 4 shot groups that are consistent, then they also are valid, unless your shooting requires more shots. Then you are cheating yourself. As we know, some barrels get quirky over long strings.

    As said, the real killer is the guy who fires ONE three shot group and determines that this is his average accuracy. With the worst loads I can get often get one three shot group that looks acceptable.~Muir

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