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Thread: What would you have done?

  1. #1

    What would you have done?

    Out stalking this morning, spot 12 fallow in a field, 1 big buck rest does & fawns, stalk into them to try and shoot a yearling, shoot said animal then start the routine of retrieving the carcass. On approaching the animal I see another animal hung up in the all to common top 2 strands of barbed wire on the fenceline, I cautiously get to this animal without alarming and stressing it further and identify it as a young doe fawn, she was caught just above her cleats on her left hind leg. I presumed on my way to her that it was an animal that had just vacated the field after the initial shot but on further inspection could see that it had been there sometime as the earth surrounding the animal was bare and she had superficial cuts on her forelegs where she had been struggling for some time. After briefly trying to see if she could be freed I made the decision it was best to put her out of her misery.

    My question is would other people do the same, or free her and hope she had no lasting injuries so could fully recover?

  2. #2

  3. #3
    it sounds like you did the right thing ,

    Well done

  4. #4
    the discision can be yours and yours alone
    were you there to cull deer if so the one in the fence is another cull amimal
    There is often too much bull**** spoken and written why free it to then go out in a couple of days and shoot one which has not been injured?

  5. #5
    Seen the same sort of thing many times with fallow some have been there a while and to be honest the meat is not usually any good
    some that look like they have only just got trapped I have released and nearly all of them have done no good
    we have shot quite a lot of three legged animals and once a white pricket with both back legs missing at the hock that had totally healed up !
    Regards andy

  6. #6
    Once caught in the fence they will rip the muscles in their leg badly and start to go into shock through stress and bleeding in the torn muscles quite quick, you did the right thing.

  7. #7
    Good decision. I've skinned one which I shot while stuck in a fence. The leg was in a terrible mess inside. Lot's of torn muscle and internal bleeding. The trouble is once released it's often too late to deliver a safe clean shot as you watch the wretched beast limp off in line with a footpath/road/(insert other hazards here............).

  8. #8
    Good call dp
    Blessed be the sheeple for they shall inherit bugger all...

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by paul at barony View Post
    Once caught in the fence they will rip the muscles in their leg badly and start to go into shock through stress and bleeding in the torn muscles quite quick, you did the right thing.
    Thats an interesting observation. How do you know that?
    If that was the case why do we see animals with fence trap injuries ie. bare cannon bones or missing feet/partial limb which have not died and are in relatively good order?

  10. #10
    Defo did the right thing.
    I'm telling Captain - from the Wee'est of men.

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