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Thread: The potential new recruit - Airedale Terrier

  1. #1

    The potential new recruit - Airedale Terrier

    Ok guys I need a bit of feedback.

    I was about to venture into the world of working a traditional Irish Breed, the Kerry Blue, which my grandad worked all his life with tremendous success in stalking and rough shooting.

    Now I know many would say the two should never be mixed especially when seperate dogs can do each task instead of using a dog which may only have a mediocre ability at both tasks.

    This is where this post gets interesting...........

    I have been looking at breeds i.e. the GWP which can be extremely versatile, or the springer of which I am very experienced with and have had tremendous success throughout the years. The wife-to-be is taking me tonight to look at an Airedale. Now I was a bit hesitant at the start but as I read about this dogin the field, I am starting to think that with time, patience and quality training I might have a winner here.

    Has anyone had or heard of success with this breed as the main hunting articles I read are that this dog has the "capability" of being exceptional with the right handler.

    I am actually a bit nervous because I am really going outside the "box" here so to speak!

    Any feedback at all is greatly appreciated and considering I am going to view the wee bitch tonight I will have a few photos up if I feel she is right for me or more importantly if I am right for her.

  2. #2
    Nice looking dog the airedale . . . I meet a guy out walking one every week . . . large solid dog, which by the looks of it would have no problem dealing with a roe . . . . Although he complains that it won't do a bleeding thing its told, and is a seriously 'hard headed bastward' I think his words were

    I don't know if this is a trait of the breed as a whole or maybe just his training, or lack of it !!!

    I notice your other thread about the Irish Blue Terrier . . . cracking looking dog.

  3. #3
    I had various airedales growing up, fantastic dogs, but headstrong mother F88kers. Take it into the woods at your peril. If it sees a fox, squirrel or any other thing it thinks it can kill, it will try. and you wont stop it trying no matter how hard you try!

    My old man lost one dog, found it hanging out a fox hole, so grabbed by the hind leg dragged it out, put it on the lead and took it home. He then took off the lead in the garden and the fecker jumped the hedge and took off for the fox hole once more. By the time I got to it, he had dug out the hole and was badly cut to the nose and eye but he was still not for stopping. I got him home and washed him with a bucket of cold soapy water to calm him down and clean his wounds which were not to bad thankfully.

    i wont even tell you about the neighbours siamese cat, or what happened to it.

    I now have a GWP, who is a puppy still but a fecking coward, you do miss the terrier instinct sometimes, not many other dogs messed with the airedale twice.

    So I love the dogs and they are very capable but unless you are a wizard at dog training.....................................

    PS my brother has a Kerry Blue

  4. #4
    This is the predicament I am in.

    I am in a wildfowling club with over 1000 acres to shoot and would you believe not a deer to be seen on the ground.....FACT! This ground has some of the most formidable rough shooting with heather, woodland, bogland, ditches and freshwater shoreline. Absolute wilderness. It amazes me evry time I walk it that we don't have a single deer. This is close to the parental home but where I live now is filled with deer.

    I also stalk and I'm currently waiting on a 308 going on the permit and have access to all mountain terrain.

    With work I am forced to have one dog only. I originally trained springers which can do everything including stalk but struggle in the large waves of Lough Neagh. Its not to say the springer can't do it......but.......it gives me an excuse to be a bit adventurous and look at other breeds.

    My original case was either the GWP or definitely the Kerry Blue.......both beautiful dogs, but the Kerry has taken a twist where breeding is concerned and it could be a real gamble as I might end up picking a show bloodline with many of the qualities missing that I require. I understand that this can happen with any of the dogs but with the Kerry it is especially so.......although my grandfather and his grandfather really worked these dogs hard back in the day. By that I mean deer and Irish Guinea Pigs which was once legal until the 80's (I think).

    I need an all rounder. The GWP would seem the safe bet, but a friend works Airedales and is pleading with me to take this 9wk old bitch, as he can't speak highly enough of this breed. Anyone who says dogs on different game can't be done must meet my brother's whippet. An exceptional gundog at quartering, pointing, retrieving, silent in a hide and can be shot over as well as a runner.

    So here I now stand with a 9week old bitch ready to go to a home in the mountains with more heather and sitka spruce than she will see in a lifetime. Foxes, Pheasant, Woodcock, Sika, Fallow and Red............so this has to be the dog, or at least tried and tested in the field......pardon the pun.

  5. #5
    Cut yourself a good strong willow switch and go collect your Airedale pup . . . . .or leave your willow switch to season and strengthen until spring and get a GWP

  6. #6
    Hello All.
    What interests me in this post is not so much can a Kerry Blue , or Airedale become a good all round working dog for deer / ducks, whatever would it not be sensible to see or find out what the parent's, Grandparent's etc' do , can do , have done surely would that not give you a clue ??. Also if they were that good or versatile would you not see or hear of the breed more often.
    Sorry not meaning to insult anyone but it seems like every time I look on here someone has found or is thinking of some totally unsuitable breed to do a job that it or they are not suited for . Would it not make sense to get a Lab perfect for water work and good for Deer ( proven many times ?) or even better in my opinion , dare I say it a German Wirehaired Pointer the best all rounder there is.
    TO STRIVE, TO SEEK, TO FIND. AND NEVER TO YIELD.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by widu View Post
    Hello All.
    What interests me in this post is not so much can a Kerry Blue , or Airedale become a good all round working dog for deer / ducks, whatever would it not be sensible to see or find out what the parent's, Grandparent's etc' do , can do , have done surely would that not give you a clue ??. Also if they were that good or versatile would you not see or hear of the breed more often.
    Sorry not meaning to insult anyone but it seems like every time I look on here someone has found or is thinking of some totally unsuitable breed to do a job that it or they are not suited for . Would it not make sense to get a Lab perfect for water work and good for Deer ( proven many times ?) or even better in my opinion , dare I say it a German Wirehaired Pointer the best all rounder there is.
    You may dare.....I will shoot you down for saying it though,lab,lab oh and lab is the best all rounder.
    Water work,none better.Deer work,better than hairy alligator as they don't want to eat/kill anything that moves.
    How many dogs has the OP had/trained/worked out of interest,could have bearing on breed that is chosen as well.
    Listen to 308boy about the Airedales,killing machine.Cadex is spot on,I'd use alkathene pipe though,tough like the dog.
    Would you get away with getting 2 dogs?
    A Lab for both jobs and the Airedale for killing things,a the best with your choice,take your time and pick whatever breed you want,you'll get on better with a breed you want rather than one forced on you,whether there is a pup there or not.....take your time.
    Seems youve made your mind up for the Airedale,seen other thread,best of luck with it,I've a feeling you may need it.Sure with patience you'll be fine.
    Last edited by Wolverine; 28-12-2012 at 01:52.

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  8. #8
    ran them on pigs for years........ we called them mid weekers.......take them hunting on saturday and you may get them back mid week.

    if you are already going to look at a pup then chances are are already hooked mate.

    gwp or lab would be a better choice.

  9. #9
    Neil's Sondergaard makes reference in his book to starting with a dog that was at least bred for the task you intend using it for. Sound advice, other wise don't be surprised if in 3 years you have a pet in one hand and are now looking for a more suitable dog...

  10. #10
    I have to agree with wolverine here, the Lab is the most versatile gundog breed off all bar none and doesnae get the credit they deserve.
    My labs hunt almost as hard as my spaniel in cover and harder than some spaniels i've seen, and would beat my GWP at every aspect of gundog work hands down, if i didnae want a dog that pointed there is no way i'd ever have an HPR, takes a very very good 1 to even keep up with an average lab (on general gundog work)

    U mention wildfowling althou u dinae mention if u want ur dog to do a lot off water work (esp coastal is hard work) a lot of HPR's aren't the keenest in water full stop and i'm talking flat mill ponds here in summer(generally smooth coated variaties), althou i have seen some good hpr's mad keen on swimming.

    The bottom line is a rare breed dog is rare for a reason, generally there not as good as a popular breed (lab/spaniel depending on job) poorer bloodlines, harder to train and more expensive pup's. Why would anyone really want 1?
    Sometimes it can be hard enough to train dog to a decent stanard that was breed for the job why would u try to train something that's been selectivly breed for hundreds of years for a specific iob and attempt to train it for a completly different job. Why p**s into the wind, eventually u will get wet.

    If i came on asking wether i should buy a porsche cayene or a subru impretza as my next truck for feeding pheasants i'd get laughed off the site, yet both are 4x4's but been designed for very diferent purposes just like dogs.
    Far better looking at wot u need a dog for then finding a breed to suit u and wot u expect

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