Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17

Thread: Difference in primers

  1. #1

    Difference in primers

    Ok here's 1 for the re-loading buffs amoungst us...

    I using fed 210 match primers. Now these primers which I have are about to run out. Now I have a couple of hundred fed 210's to use. I have made a few test loads to work up to be on the safe side.

    But my question, do you think there will there be alot of difference? Shift of Impact etc???



    nutty

  2. #2
    You are certainly doing the right thing by developing your loads again with test loads nutty.
    I wouldn't have thought that because they are of the same manufacturer that there would be much diference in this case only that more care has been taken with the manufacture of the match primers. I actually have one reloading manual that claims that changing primers makes very little difference but this goes against both popular and considered opinion.
    It's the calibre of the shooter that counts not the calibre of the rifle.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by 8x57 View Post
    You are certainly doing the right thing by developing your loads again with test loads nutty.
    I wouldn't have thought that because they are of the same manufacturer that there would be much diference in this case only that more care has been taken with the manufacture of the match primers. I actually have one reloading manual that claims that changing primers makes very little difference but this goes against both popular and considered opinion.

    This is my thinking also. The loads Im using are well inside the safe working pressure of my rifle. Ive went 2 full grains of powder over my working load whilst working up the 1st time.


    nutty

  4. #4
    It it smart to rework loads; especially when running on the high end of pressures. One interesting thing is that there have been times in my shooting career when changing primers only has made a dramatic change in accuracy. I once ran out of Remington 9.5 primers and used Winchester. Groups went from well under MOA to 1.2 inches. I was pretty shocked so I switched back and forth again after I got 9.5 Rems. Identical results. It was a lesson learned.

    That presented, in match loads for the 308 I have seen no appreciable change in performance switching from Federal Match to standard 210's but these are mild loads.~Muir

  5. #5
    Hi nutty, info I have read appears to regard Fed 210 & Rem 9 1/2 primers as being at the lower end of primer pressure scale, whereas CCI200 & Winchester are toward the upper end.

    My understanding of the difference between the Fed210 & Fed210 Match primers is related to better/closer tolerance in manufacture of the Fed210 Match primer, not particularly that there's a significant pressure difference.

    However, others in their posts here have said reworking the load is the best plan & I'd certainly go along with that. ATB
    Blaser K95 Luxus Kipplaufbüchse .25-06Rem. Zeiss 8x56, 110gn Nosler Accubond = Game Over!

  6. #6
    Rather than pressure do you mean brisance (intensity of flame or explosive power) deeangeo?
    It's the calibre of the shooter that counts not the calibre of the rifle.

  7. #7
    Perhaps 8x57 although I don't recall the word 'brisance' being used.

    To be honest, if I've changed a component I've usually worked the load again unless I've been pretty certain the load wasn't operating near max.
    However, these days with my own particular loads I have done all the work with Rem. 9 1/2, Fed 210 & CCI200 and can switch between the three if I need to - and that's not very often. ATB
    Blaser K95 Luxus Kipplaufbüchse .25-06Rem. Zeiss 8x56, 110gn Nosler Accubond = Game Over!

  8. #8
    I have lists of the various brisance ratings of primers in a couple of my reloading manuals. Obviously the more intensive the flame the quicker the powder charge is ignited and the steeper the pressure curve rises.
    We all seem to be of the same mind then that it's better to work up a load again if you have to substitute your normal primers then.
    It's the calibre of the shooter that counts not the calibre of the rifle.

  9. #9
    not comprehensive but useful nevertheless


  10. #10
    As Muir commented when I posted the above chart 2 years ago, "Listing has not been scientifically proven. Use at your own risk."
    http://www.thestalkingdirectory.co.u...mer+heat+chart
    Post 10
    It is funny how this info is copied and pasted purely because it is available with a quick search. It has no scientific basis as the author points out.
    There are a few other tests on the net for primers, and I read the one Muir refers to, but I can't find it now.
    Absolutely no criticism of you for posting the chart as I have done the same, merely an observation of people trying to help perhaps.

    I had been using CCI400 on my 222 and under a glass I noticed cratering.
    I read up on the 400s and read comments that they are for lower pressures, e.g. Hornet. I also used some BR4 and they have no crater, so I will use up the 400 then buy more BR4.
    The above chart did not tell me that.

Similar Threads

  1. Whats the difference
    By Lucky Sniper in forum Rifles & Calibres
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 26-11-2012, 19:45
  2. Whats the difference.
    By squirrelnutkin in forum Jokes & Funnies
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 29-07-2012, 12:26
  3. The difference after being dressed.
    By weeman in forum Deer Stalking General
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 25-11-2011, 18:48
  4. Whats the difference
    By Mannlicher_Stu in forum Jokes & Funnies
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 26-01-2011, 20:35
  5. Difference
    By Mannlicher_Stu in forum Jokes & Funnies
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 18-04-2010, 09:28

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •