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Thread: ??? from Texas about Yorkshire pudding.

  1. #1

    Question ??? from Texas about Yorkshire pudding.

    Is Original 'Yorkshire Pudding Mix 142g' from England worth the $3.50 a box Id have to pay for it, or can I use some kind of pancake batter? I've found this, it seems simple http://britishfood.about.com/od/regi.../yorkspuds.htm

    When one puts gravey on YP are you talking about just natural drippings or a gravey made from flour? capt david

  2. #2
    Yorkshire pudding batter Is just flower, egg and milk.

    As for gravy you can either use a branded mix like "Bisto" or make it properly with cooking juices, stock, sometimes maybe port, sherry, or wine, and thickened by reducing and using cornflour.

    Hope that helps.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by captdavid View Post
    Is Original 'Yorkshire Pudding Mix 142g' from England worth the $3.50 a box Id have to pay for it, or can I use some kind of pancake batter? I've found this, it seems simple http://britishfood.about.com/od/regi.../yorkspuds.htm

    When one puts gravey on YP are you talking about just natural drippings or a gravey made from flour? capt david
    1lb and a quarter of flour - 10 Eggs and Two pints of milk + Salt
    Whisk - Strain out any remaining lumps and chill before use It should have the consistency of single cream - makes about 60 individual puddings !
    Proper gravy is another thread!
    Ed
    This page might help with more realistic amounts - Good Luck -http://www.bbc.co.uk/food/recipes/search?keywords=%22Yorkshire+pudding%22&x=19&y=16
    Last edited by Edchef; 25-01-2013 at 06:14. Reason: Additional info.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Edchef View Post
    1lb and a quarter of flour - 10 Eggs and Two pints of milk + Salt
    Whisk - Strain out any remaining lumps and chill before use It should have the consistency of single cream - makes about 60 individual puddings !
    Proper gravy is another thread!
    Ed

    Wow, how many people are you feeding? The Be-Ro book says:

    4oz Plain flour,
    Pinch salt,
    1 medium egg,
    1/2 pint milk.

    1 - Mix flour and salt in a basin, make a hollow in the centre and drop in egg.
    2 - Stir with wooden spoon and add liquid gradually, until flour is worked in.
    3 - Beat well and add remaining liquid.
    4 - Heat oven to 450f.
    5 - Heat some oil in a cupcake tin until smoking hot.
    6 - Pour batter into the tins, until 1/2 full and bake for about 20 mins or until golden brown.
    I'm telling Captain - from the Wee'est of men.

  5. #5
    dont forget its plain flour,
    not self raising

  6. #6
    I'm sure that your puds taste good, Edchef, but The Bero book is closest to the real thing with one egg. This idea of dumping a farmyard full of eggs is in there is a modern trend, and misses the point and the origin of the pudding, which was to spin out a small piece of meat to feed a whole family. Only the man of the house would get meat, because a joint for the whole family would be unaffordable and since he did the hard manual labour in the pit or the mill, he was the one who needed the protein most. This was roasted on the oven rack or trivet. A pan of pudding batter was placed underneath to catch the drips and take on the beef's flavour, and this is what the wife and kids got to eat. Nobody could afford to fritter 10 eggs on one meal.

    As per tjwaines' recipe. Add the milk a bit at a time and beat the mixture with a spoon. You're looking for a consistency like pouring cream. Get your pudding tin, with enough beef fat in the bottom to just cover it (1-2mm depth), and preheat it 'til it's smoking hot in the oven. Then tip almost all of your batter in and get it straight back in the oven. Do not be tempted to open the oven door to peek, 'cos this will make our pud collapse.
    The gravy is made by deglazing your beef roasting pan with water and/or stock to get the tasty bits of juices out, so you end up with a watery brown liquid. I like to add a dash of worcestershire sauce. If you reserved a bit of your pudding batter in the bottom of your mixing bowl, you can now make use of this by tipping some of your beef stock into the bowl, stirring, then returning the lot back to the gravy to thicken it.

    CaptDavid, can i just say how pleased I am to see others taking an interest in the culinary habits of such a fine county. I Came across this recently, which I think says it all...

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	yorkshire.jpg 
Views:	53 
Size:	63.9 KB 
ID:	23918

  7. #7
    You know, i have tried everything to cook the perfect Yorkshire pud and have only done it once, so now we buy them frozen.
    Bizarre, i can teach people to fly fish, mentor people, get clients on a deer, but cook a pud, forget it!
    Cheers
    Richard

  8. #8
    This will just go on and on and on. Almost EVERYONE has their own way. Peronally I use plain flour, a couple of good eggs and milk with a twist of salt. Generally make it a few hours early and give it a bash with a whisk anytime i'm in the kitchen otherwise leave it alone. Then pour it into HOT fat and cook in a hot oven for about 30-40 minutes. Easy peasy.

    When will someone attack the use of milk? Many people use water for a lighter mix.

  9. #9
    I make yorkshires with cup of plain flour cup of eggs cup of milk pinch of salt. use any measure just equal amounts of all three. make sure the oil in the tin is absolutely roasting hot before you put your batter in to bake. I often use a bit of batter/ yorkshire mix to thicken gravy by stirring a bit into the simmering gravy.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by klunk View Post
    I'm sure that your puds taste good, Edchef, but The Bero book is closest to the real thing with one egg. This idea of dumping a farmyard full of eggs is in there is a modern trend, and misses the point and the origin of the pudding, which was to spin out a small piece of meat to feed a whole family. Only the man of the house would get meat, because a joint for the whole family would be unaffordable and since he did the hard manual labour in the pit or the mill, he was the one who needed the protein most. This was roasted on the oven rack or trivet. A pan of pudding batter was placed underneath to catch the drips and take on the beef's flavour, and this is what the wife and kids got to eat. Nobody could afford to fritter 10 eggs on one meal.

    As per tjwaines' recipe. Add the milk a bit at a time and beat the mixture with a spoon. You're looking for a consistency like pouring cream. Get your pudding tin, with enough beef fat in the bottom to just cover it (1-2mm depth), and preheat it 'til it's smoking hot in the oven. Then tip almost all of your batter in and get it straight back in the oven. Do not be tempted to open the oven door to peek, 'cos this will make our pud collapse.
    The gravy is made by deglazing your beef roasting pan with water and/or stock to get the tasty bits of juices out, so you end up with a watery brown liquid. I like to add a dash of worcestershire sauce. If you reserved a bit of your pudding batter in the bottom of your mixing bowl, you can now make use of this by tipping some of your beef stock into the bowl, stirring, then returning the lot back to the gravy to thicken it.

    CaptDavid, can i just say how pleased I am to see others taking an interest in the culinary habits of such a fine county. I Came across this recently, which I think says it all...

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	yorkshire.jpg 
Views:	53 
Size:	63.9 KB 
ID:	23918
    I think you'll find, EdChef's recipie is for 60yp's, so that's one egg per 6yp's, so it may be a 'farmyard' of eggs, but it's feeding the whole farm

    atb

    The Tramp

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