Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16

Thread: impregnated woods for stocks?

  1. #1

    impregnated woods for stocks?

    Just curious but do you get impregnated wooden stocks on rifles? I guess the stocks would weigh a bit more as it is usually Done using acrylic melted in acetone and applied in a pressure chamber. The benefit is that you retain the the qualities of the wood but it is totally stable and will not take on any damp. I have never seen it advertised in conjunction with guns, and was wondering if there is a reason it's not done or whether it is something that has not been tried before.

  2. #2
    That sounds like a great idea ! Some of the custom knife handles Dougster was making using this technique in his recent posts were stunning.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by David T View Post
    That sounds like a great idea ! Some of the custom knife handles Dougster was making using this technique in his recent posts were stunning.
    I've impregnated wood for fly rods in the past, and it struck me as a way of gaining a very stable, wood stock without loosing the looks. The finish is akin to a. Oil finish in depth, but is utterly resistance to moisture, rot, warping, etc.

  4. #4
    SD Regular johngryphon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    North Eastern Victoria Australia Mitta Mitta Sambar country.
    Posts
    3,422
    Deer Dog Available
    "you nae be needing these no more"
    I said as I slipped the knife through the cord

    সাম্বার হরিণ



  5. #5
    Fangler,

    I have had similar thoughts in the past and wondered why manufacturers don't do stabilised wooden stocks. They would seem to be the best of both worlds.

    I think the main reason they're not available is because there's a maximum thickness of wood that the resin will penetrate and stocks are too thick. I can't think of any other reason.

    cheers,

    Bob

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Dovebob View Post
    Fangler,

    I have had similar thoughts in the past and wondered why manufacturers don't do stabilised wooden stocks. They would seem to be the best of both worlds.

    I think the main reason they're not available is because there's a maximum thickness of wood that the resin will penetrate and stocks are too thick. I can't think of any other reason.

    cheers,

    Bob
    maybe that's it then, i've only tried it on smaller bits of wood. however i'm pretty sure that you would be able to get a good enough penetration (o0h matron!) on any thickness found in a stock given time and enough pressure/ vacuum. guess there must be a reason why they don't do it as it seems like a sensible option if possible.

  7. #7
    Given that there are only a few sections of a stock that are very thick, and the amount of saturation the guy in the listed post seems to be getting, surely most of the stock would achieve total saturation, and those few bits that dont will effectively have the unsaturated inner portion of the wood encapsulated by the saturated outer portion?
    .308, because if I want to watch something run away, I'll take my dog for a walk.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by hughsurrey View Post
    Given that there are only a few sections of a stock that are very thick, and the amount of saturation the guy in the listed post seems to be getting, surely most of the stock would achieve total saturation, and those few bits that dont will effectively have the unsaturated inner portion of the wood encapsulated by the saturated outer portion?
    And that is a pretty crude way of doing it. But you're bang on with the way that it would be encapsulated.

  9. #9
    Speaking as a stock maker, one word.
    cost!

    The bigger problem is not impregnating stocks with resin. It is the choice of woods that are used by rifle makers.
    Basically you seem to have 2 choices

    Bad or good walnut and tulip wood!

    Selection process for timber seems almost non-existent nowadays with the budget rifle makers. That's where the problems start.

    Species selection and attention to detail can yield some excellent results.

    But no doubt some will try and do it with soft woods and then charge you the customer lots more for it (laminates for example AKA ply-wood). Time will tell.

    Please also remember that the finished size of the wood used in a stock is not the starting size.

    For example if you were to cut a stock that is 62.5 mm wide you would start wit around 70mm thickness. thats the only way you can get the kind of finish that is required.
    Last edited by Simjim33; 18-02-2013 at 14:04.

  10. #10
    I’m surprised no one has mentioned weight albeit this would depend hugely on penetration. As the actress ...................................

Similar Threads

  1. Bear In The Woods
    By Fallow Stalker in forum Photos
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 20-05-2013, 21:58
  2. A year in the woods
    By Spoony in forum Deer Stalking General
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 11-07-2011, 11:56
  3. 375 H+H for the woods
    By MarkH in forum Rifles & Calibres
    Replies: 50
    Last Post: 06-09-2010, 10:07
  4. A year in the woods.
    By Moonraker68 in forum Deer Stalking General
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: 25-03-2010, 09:36
  5. If you go down to the woods (in the USA) today...
    By Steve in forum Deer Stalking General
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 26-07-2007, 12:53

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •