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Thread: Stainless bore cleaning

  1. #1

    Stainless bore cleaning

    I currently have blued barrels on all of my rifles but am considering getting a new rifle with stainless barrel. I currently clean with butches bore shine and find it does the job for me very well.

    Should I use a different cleaning regime for a stainless bore or will the method I use for the blued barrel work just as well?

  2. #2
    Despite the lengthy argum... err spirited debates over this and that particular cleaner etc a good number perform well.

    Butches is a personal favourite and has worked well on my S75 stainless for several years now. Because of the nature of what I do, that's a great deal more use than 'normal', nothing adverse to report.
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  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Moray Outfitting View Post
    Despite the lengthy argum... err spirited debates over this and that particular cleaner etc a good number perform well.

    Butches is a personal favourite and has worked well on my S75 stainless for several years now. Because of the nature of what I do, that's a great deal more use than 'normal', nothing adverse to report.
    Thanks for that, set my mind at ease.

  4. #4
    Err, does not the term "Stain Less" refer to the outer finish of the barrel....

    Stan

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by smullery View Post
    Err, does not the term "Stain Less" refer to the outer finish of the barrel....

    Stan
    I have no idea, does it or is it different steel?

  6. #6
    Not aware of any difference in cleaning with regard to the outer finish of a barrel.

    Stan

  7. #7
    Stains - less, is the correct term applied to this material, Stainless is a corrupted term, you may find , as many I know with stain- less barrels, cleaning is easier & quicker than on carbon / chrome moly steels, also people have commented that shooting in, is quicker with this material.
    (The Unspeakable In Pursuit Of The Uneatable.) " If I can help, I will help!." Former S.A.C.S. member!

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by smullery View Post
    Err, does not the term "Stain Less" refer to the outer finish of the barrel....

    Stan
    I thought it was a metal quality rather than a finish.

  9. #9
    Worth a read...http://www.google.co.uk/url?sa=t&rct...yW839DaAFlq51g

    In 1913, English metallurgist Harry Brearly, working on a project to improve rifle barrels, accidentally discovered that adding chromium to low carbon steel gives it stain resistance. In addition to iron, carbon, and chromium, modern stainless steel may also contain other elements, such as nickel, niobium, molybdenum, and titanium. Nickel, molybdenum, niobium, and chromium enhance the corrosion resistance of stainless steel. It is the addition of a minimum of 12% chromium to the steel that makes it resist rust, or stain 'less' than other types of steel. The chromium in the steel combines with oxygen in the atmosphere to form a thin, invisible layer of chrome-containing oxide, called the passive film. The sizes of chromium atoms and their oxides are similar, so they pack neatly together on the surface of the metal, forming a stable layer only a few atoms thick. If the metal is cut or scratched and the passive film is disrupted, more oxide will quickly form and recover the exposed surface, protecting it from oxidative corrosion. (Iron, on the other hand, rusts quickly because atomic iron is much smaller than its oxide, so the oxide forms a loose rather than tightly-packed layer and flakes away.) The passive film requires oxygen to self-repair, so stainless steels have poor corrosion resistance in low-oxygen and poor circulation environments. In seawater, chlorides from the salt will attack and destroy the passive film more quickly than it can be repaired in a low oxygen environment.

    Types of Stainless Steel
    The three main types of stainless steels are austenitic, ferritic, and martensitic. These three types of steels are identified by their microstructure or predominant crystal phase.
    Austenitic:
    Austenitic steels have austenite as their primary phase (face centered cubic crystal). These are alloys containing chromium and nickel (sometimes manganese and nitrogen), structured around the Type 302 composition of iron, 18% chromium, and 8% nickel. Austenitic steels are not hardenable by heat treatment. The most familiar stainless steel is probably Type 304, sometimes called T304 or simply 304. Type 304 surgical stainless steel is an austenitic steel containing 18-20% chromium and 8-10% nickel.
    Ferritic:
    Ferritic steels have ferrite (body centered cubic crystal) as their main phase. These steels contain iron and chromium, based on the Type 430 composition of 17% chromium. Ferritic steel is less ductile than austenitic steel and is not hardenable by heat treatment.
    Martensitic:
    The characteristic orthorhombic martensite microstructure was first observed by German microscopist Adolf Martens around 1890. Martensitic steels are low carbon steels built around the Type 410 composition of iron, 12% chromium, and 0.12% carbon. They may be tempered and hardened. Martensite gives steel great hardness, but it also reduces its toughness and makes it brittle, so few steels are fully hardened.
    There are also other grades of stainless steels, such as precipitation-hardened, duplex, and cast stainless steels. Stainless steel can be produced in a variety of finishes and textures and can be tinted over a broad spectrum of colors. this second read is copyright from chemistry.about.com › ... › Chemistry FactsChemistry Articles
    (The Unspeakable In Pursuit Of The Uneatable.) " If I can help, I will help!." Former S.A.C.S. member!

  10. #10
    I was about to say that

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