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Thread: This is a new one on me !

  1. #1

    This is a new one on me !

    this is a new one on me , a friend of mine sent me this picture of a case which he loaded 12 times , its hornady 6.5x55 brass from once fired in his rifle .

    his standard load is 42gn of RL22 under 140gn hornady interlock .

    he told me he fired the round , ejected the case picked it up and put it in a tub with the others .

    ive never seen or heard anything like it ! opinions welcome

    Attachment 25088

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  2. #2
    I know you said this morning you were going to send some 6.5 loads through to me Lee but I think you can keep that one!

  3. #3
    It's a new idea on accsess for cleaning the primer pockets!
    (The Unspeakable In Pursuit Of The Uneatable.) " If I can help, I will help!." Former S.A.C.S. member!

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by leec6.5 View Post
    this is a new one on me , a friend of mine sent me this picture of a case which he loaded 12 times , its hornady 6.5x55 brass from once fired in his rifle .

    his standard load is 42gn of RL22 under 140gn hornady interlock .

    he told me he fired the round , ejected the case picked it up and put it in a tub with the others .

    ive never seen or heard anything like it ! opinions welcome

    Attachment 25088


    hi feller this may be an incipient case head separation.
    most time there's a mark around the base of case its where your sizing die stops. If so, your case displays evidence of possible case head expansion.

    Case head expansion has few possible causes: brass too soft and overworked brass or loads too hot.
    i'v had it on mod radway cases and on a 375 pistol both on old reloaded brass. not saying this is what you have but look on net and you will find out more



  5. #5
    I think it's more than an incipient case head separation!! It has definitely separated. As far as I know it is because of case stretching thinning the web. Sometimes you will get a bright ring forming just before the case fails. Time to junk the rest of the brass and buy some new stuff!

  6. #6
    Crikey Paul a .375 pistol, H&H by any chance?

    I think you may have transposed the last two digits???? I know as I do it all the time, I'm hopeless at remembering numbers.
    It's the calibre of the shooter that counts not the calibre of the rifle.

  7. #7
    This isn't incipient because it's already happened

    This is just a theory but I'm wondering if these Hornady (Frontier) cases were from Superformance ammunition. Any way of knowing?

    Hornady claim to get 100-200 fps more out of every calibre in this range, and trumpet this all over their website. To do that they claim to have developed new propellants - 'Superformance' powders - and adopted new loading techniques to increase velocity while staying within industry SAAMI pressures. One way of doing this would be to load bigger charges of slower burning powder, but of course there's only so much one can stuff in the case of a finite capacity - unless you increase the internal volume of the case.

    I usually weigh the cases from various makers, and I shoot a fair few calibres. Without exception the once-fired cases with a Hornady headstamp are lighter (so thinner) than other brands, and will have more room inside. That's the situation in all the .222, .243, .25-06, and .308 cases I have anyway. I haven't got my hands on 6.5x55 in Hornady yet, so can't say that's true of these.

    It could be that in order to get the capacity increase required, they've changed the temper of the brass case, or changed the mix of the alloy, and maybe made it harder in the process. I'm no metallurgist, but I think that work hardening would then set in sooner to limit the number of reloads before such a case splits.
    If I'm going to be accused of it then it's just as well I did it.

  8. #8
    Good Grief. It had been reloaded TWELVE times. Judging by the location of the separation (well above the head) it most likely stretched itself thin and separated. It's old brass. No need for clinical dissection here. Tell him to pitch the LOT.

    Additionally, if this was a 'new one' then you have never read a book on reloading because there are pictures of this kind of thing in darned near every one of them that I have read.~Muir

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Sinistral View Post
    I usually weigh the cases from various makers, and I shoot a fair few calibres. Without exception the once-fired cases with a Hornady headstamp are lighter (so thinner) than other brands, and will have more room inside. That's the situation in all the .222, .243, .25-06, and .308 cases I have anyway. I haven't got my hands on 6.5x55 in Hornady yet, so can't say that's true of these.
    Very interesting, thanks for that info - seriously.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Muir View Post
    Good Grief. It had been reloaded TWELVE times.
    if it was full length resized .303 fair enough, but neck sized rimless decent brass lasts longer than that without catastrophic failure.

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