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Thread: Code of practise

  1. #1

    Code of practise

    Well we seem to have one for snaring, deer, lamping etc. So what would you think as an appropriate voluntary code of practise for wild boar?

    (So that there are less orphans, wounded boar and safeguard their existance as well as reduce their impact on the farming fraternities lively hood.)

    I reckon there must be a few others here who have been involved with wild boar in europe either through management or sport shooting who could give ideas. Just as there are people here who have been shooting them for a fair few years and found suitable management ideas that work for them in Britian.

    regards Teal.

  2. #2
    Teal,

    I think it is a good idea.
    I have been involved in wild boar management in Poland for 10 years and am willing to help.

    Regards,
    Greg

  3. #3
    Hi glogin
    Thank you for your reply. With your experience of boar in Poland what would your recommendations be, for the type of boar shooting done here under our current restriction with dogs etc?

    teal

  4. #4
    Teal,

    In my opinion, you dont need driven hunts to keep wild boar population in check. Driven hunts with dogs are more of a traditional thing than a proper boar management.
    Individual stalks and shooting from high seats should be enough.
    I would also like to see closed season for sows introduced. I think 1st February-31st August would be ok.
    I think wild boar should not be lamped as well as deer.
    I would like to see British wild boar population to grow, which might not be other people's (farmers) ponit of view...


    Regards,
    Greg

  5. #5
    Glogin is right in what he says about hunting boar with dogs. Whilst it is great fun hunting them with dogs it cannot be considered as a way of controlling a boar population. Loosing a dog on problem boar will scare them away for a short time but they will come back.
    Sows with piglets should never be shot. Yearlings can be shot all year. Adult males?

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Jagare

    Sows with piglets should never be shot. Yearlings can be shot all year. Adult males?
    In Poland adult males are not shot in March, but I guess they could be shot all year.

    I think it is important though to have good population structure. I mean, enough adult males and sows. Otherwise, young females might take part in the rut ( is this the correct term for that ) and give birth when they are yearlings later than the adult sows. Newborn piglets mature later than other and are generally in poorer condition and again give birth later, and so on, and so on...
    However, in Britain with milder climate, good eating, plenty of maize crops etc they might already breed all year round..

    Greg

  7. #7
    We have a closed season on adult male boar 15th Feb-16th April. Glogin wrote i think in a earlier post that shooting sows with dependant young makes the other sows have young at any time of the year instead of the early part of the year. This is a problem we have in Sweden in that you can now see stripy,s at any time of the year. Its taken a while for the "Swedish model" of manageing boar to take root so hopefully in the future the breeding cycle of boar will return to normal.
    The same as in England it will take a time to put in place the "English model" . The idea that you can shoot any boar at any time leads to big problems in the future. The boar are there to stay in England and a getting the culling right leads to less problems in the future.

    Trapping works well in the short term but being the clever animals that they are they soon learn and trapping becomes less effective.

  8. #8
    i am very lucky to have access to a very small population of boar, but i have also seen the destruction they cause. althou on a very small scale compared to photos i've seen from elsewhere and abroad. i personally have a split opinion on boar 1 side is like the majority on here and want to manage them sustaiably. the other (tin hat and flak jacket on) i feel boar are almost an alien species (i do realise they were hewre and now extinct) asnd shouldn't really be welcomed or encouraged. we make a big deal about reintroduction of beavers and the damage they would cause to salmon fishing yet we are keen to encourage 300lb+ boar to run about the countryside to give a lucky few of us a bit of sport, destroying farmers crops and crashing into cars for fun.i think as stalkers (and mainly recreational at that) we have to make important decisions with boar. while it is great to go out and shoot the odd one, this is just a hobby for us and concern should be given to the farmer. do we really want boar roaming wild over the whole of uk. i know i may upset stalkers by saying this but the bottom line is they are very hard to control the population due to there life style. would it be possible to cull enough boar if you took away the lamping/night shooting.

    there is an article in the shooting times this week about the french management and saying it basically doesnt work very well they are now averageing522,000 boar a year up from 415,000 betweem 04/06. 22m euro for crop compensation and between 115m-180m euro in rta. they are now trying rationing the food in the hoppers in one area; 100kg food for 100 hectares. thats a hell of a lot of money to subsidise a few peoples hobby. also some stated recently on another thread (i think) the majority of swediosh boar escap;ed from farms in the 70's and now have to shoot 2 000 000 (i think) just to keep population stable. with the better cliumate and more intesive agriculture your possibly only talking 15+ years to get some very high populations possibly throughout much of england.apologies for length of post, and also apologies for the content i'm not saying we should go on an all out eradication policy (and realise in m,any bigger poipulations is pretty much impossible) or trying to start any arguments or be confrontational or wot ever. i'm a total novice with boar and wondering wot do the experienced rifles out there think if you could turn the clock back 10-15 years or longer for you europeans would you manage them the same or hit them harder to try and keep the population either localised or in control. like i said i've took the stalking hat of for much of this post and took a step back to look at the bigger picture and wonder wot everyone else thinks.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by countrryboy
    there is an article in the shooting times this week about the french management and saying it basically doesnt work very well they are now averageing522,000 boar a year up from 415,000 betweem 04/06. 22m euro for crop compensation and between 115m-180m euro in rta. they are now trying rationing the food in the hoppers in one area; 100kg food for 100 hectares. thats a hell of a lot of money to subsidise a few peoples hobby.
    I do not know how it works in that muslim country across the channel. I have this weeks shooting times but have no time to read it yet.

    Boar obviously do some damage. This is the part I can see some problems - because of the difference between continental and British model. On continent, clubs manage deer and boar usually over bigger areas than here - 10-30 000 acres or more, but they also pay money to farmers for the damages wild boar do to the crops. They will balance their costs with selling venison to game dealers and from members fees. There is no government subsidising involved (at least not in Poland). In Britain a wild boar is WILD and no one is responsible for the damage they do to the crops.

    Greg

  10. #10
    As i said earlier boar are a new species here in Sweden. back on the game list after 250? years. At the start they were considered vermin to be shot on site. How did that work . So they were put on the list of huntable quarry and we are still working on ways of controling them.

    We can now shoot them at night over illuminated feed areas. It will be interesting to see how and how long that works.

    You now have boar in the UK. Believe me they are there to stay and the quicker you get good shooting , control practice in place the better.

    I heard on the radio that Boar are the third most intelligent animal after apes and Dolfins. Remember they live in the arid parts of north Africa to the deep snow covered places in Russia

    As the population grows it will be up to "stalker" to get out there and keep them under control. Lets hope they do a better job than controlling the deer population

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