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Thread: Brass Life Span - Federal, Norma

  1. #1

    Brass Life Span - Federal, Norma

    Probably been covered before but wondered if there is a hard and fast rule for the lifespan of reloading Brass?

    Accepting checks are done of the brass each time and its in good condition, trimmed and resized at what point do you decide it's time to crimp the end and send it to Brass heaven!!!

    thanks in advance...

    b

  2. #2
    HPS reload my Federal brass, and say I'll get 5 without question, and might push to 7

    Cheers
    i.
    Sako 75 6.5x55mm-Z6i 3-18x50. MauserM12 .308-SIII 6-24x50. Beretta 690 III Field 12b.
    "You have enemies? Good. That means you’ve stood up for something, sometime in your life."
    Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill (1874-1965)

  3. #3
    i use norma for my 7x64 and some split after 3 reloads,

    regards
    chris

  4. #4
    Very much depends upon calibre, load, brass quality and resizing technique in my opinion.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Penyard View Post
    Very much depends upon calibre, load, brass quality and resizing technique in my opinion.
    reloaded federal 10 times

  6. #6
    I have used Norma and Sako 243 and so far have 10 uses using a Redding S type full length die

    I have used Win and Federal 25-06 12 times before neck tension goes, I have so far had 4 uses out of the Sako I am now using, again using a Redding S type full length die.

    I have been using Fed and Norma in the 270 using an RCBS Full length die but have only used the cases twice so far so too early to say.

    In the 300 WSM I have used both Fed Brass & Win Nickel plated both have been good and consistent and have been loaded 9 times without any splits ect again like with the 243 & 25-06 I have been resizing using Redding S type dies, firstly I used a competition neck sizing die but had lots of issues with stiff to chamber rounds so switched to Full length Type s sizing die.

  7. #7
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    Setting your dies up properly for headspace etc. is often overlooked, but once set, will vastly improve your brass life. Personally I try to mostly use Lapua brass, since it is simply the best on the market for consistancy & quality. I can get 20+ reloads from a single piece before the web starts to noticeably thin.

  8. #8
    I see lots of answers but not mention that it will depend a lot on the size of the chamber the cartridge is fired in.

    if your rifles chamber is cut with a new reamer then it's going to be more than likely just a bit larger than one cut with the reamer at the end of it's service life. The tighter chamber of course allows less brass movement and should in theory give a better service life to the brass.

    Another variable of course it the dies and how tightly they are machined as this also effects the amount of brass working. have a large chamber and tight die means much more working of the brass which will most likely reduce the number of loading achieved. Tight chamber and loose die, as long as the die sizes enough for the case to chamber means the die is doing to minimum of work and brass life should be longer.

    That's all without the quality of the brass. It's just something that some never consider the relationship between dies and chamber. As to checking case life I have a small hook made from a target spot marking wire used to feel for the "Ring" that forms inside the base of the case. Once a ring can be felt it's time to retire the brass.

    Good brass will of course help but it cannot make up for die and chamber matching. This is where measuring the expansion ring on fired factory brass is of use.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Penyard View Post
    Very much depends upon calibre, load, brass quality and resizing technique in my opinion.
    Quote Originally Posted by Brithunter View Post
    Good brass will of course help but it cannot make up for die and chamber matching. ....
    Agree. I've some Remington 260 Rem brass that's just been fired 10 times and annealed after the fourth and eighth firing. I am aware that I have stupidly pushed the shoulder back too far at least once during the lifetime of the Remington brass. I had some nine times fired Sako brass when I sold my Sako 75. Regards JCS

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by AllThingsShooting View Post
    Probably been covered before but wondered if there is a hard and fast rule for the lifespan of reloading Brass?

    Accepting checks are done of the brass each time and its in good condition, trimmed and resized at what point do you decide it's time to crimp the end and send it to Brass heaven!!!

    thanks in advance...

    b
    unless the brass cracks or you primer pockets go baggy they can and will last for years espeically if you anneal them,with the cost of new brass nowerdays the service is worth every penny
    www.riflebrassrefurb.co.uk

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