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Thread: Hernia

  1. #1

    Hernia

    Had a lab pup with a hernia at 5 weeks old. Op' under general and seems fine ten days later. Wondering what will happen when sutures dissolve soon. Anyone had similar ?

  2. #2
    Was it a large hernia? Mine had one on his belly but was told to avoid bloating feed and it would disappear in time - which it has

  3. #3
    Pups can be born with it, sometimes will disappear on its own, sometimes needs op. some say it can be genetic and dogs that have the tendency should not be bred from, don't know if there is any truth in that statement or if its just another old wives tale.

    No doubt some of the vets on here will be able to answer your questions.

  4. #4
    Was it an umbilical hernia? They usually do very well. The sutures used my last for up to 6 weeks. Puppies heel quickly and I'd expect a virtually 100% cure if it is an umbilical hernia.

    Do bear in mind these are presumed to have an inherited component so maybe not a wise idea to breed from the pup.

    Section 161 of the Highways Act 1980 (England & Wales) makes it an offence to discharge a firearm within 50 ft of the centre of a highway with vehicular rights without lawful authority or excuse, if as a result a user of the highway is injured, interrupted or endangered.

  5. #5
    My pup is eleven weeks old. It has an umbilical hernia, size of five pence piece. Still debating whether to have it done. No family history of it. I have his father. Would appreciate advice from the vets here

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Dhu View Post
    My pup is eleven weeks old. It has an umbilical hernia, size of five pence piece. Still debating whether to have it done. No family history of it. I have his father. Would appreciate advice from the vets here
    Big ones not such a problem, just unsightly and nasty should dog get it caught on barbed wire . Small ones not a problem as they tend to stay the same size as the dog grows. The middle sized ones (the sort I can get my little finger in, or obviously have some fat that reduces back into the abdomen) are the danger because of the risk of intestinal entrapment. If that happens it becomes urgent, life threatening surgery.

    You need the dog in front of you really to decide. Be steered by your vet, but it could well be one I would 'fix'.

    (umbilical hernia's not difficult surgery, other hernias much trickier from a surgical standpoint).

    Section 161 of the Highways Act 1980 (England & Wales) makes it an offence to discharge a firearm within 50 ft of the centre of a highway with vehicular rights without lawful authority or excuse, if as a result a user of the highway is injured, interrupted or endangered.

  7. #7
    Apache, and it's difficult to feel the actual opening you certainly can't poke your little finger into the opening. The little bit of fat that sticks out goes back in quite easily and the hernia isn't visible all tthe time.

  8. #8
    Thanks for that. Yes it was umbilical and it is fine. This is a dog pup but I am keeping a bitch from the litter. Does this mean I should not breed from her ? Can I find out if it is down the male or female line ?

  9. #9
    Deerpath, it could be the result of an over enthusiastic bitch cleaning the pup when it was born and pulling on the umbilical cord causing a small tear in the muscle lining as opposed to something 'inherited'. Some go away without any dramas as has been said, only a vet seeing the dog in person will be able to guide you.

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