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Thread: Hunting and the food security of venison

  1. #1

    Hunting and the food security of venison

    I was sent this today, which makes some interesting reading, particularly on the issue of lead free ammunition.
    CIC press release CIC Wildlife: “All Wild?”

    “All Wild?” This was the title of a two-day symposium organised by the Federal Ministry of Food, Agriculture and Consumer Protection (BMELV - Bundesministerium für Ernährung, Landwirtschaft und Verbraucherschutz) together with the Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR – Bundesinstitut für Risikobewertung) on the results of a BMELV-research project “Hunting and the food security of venison”.

    The research found that with venison, lead is found not only close to the wounds caused by the shot, but also in other parts of the animals’ body. The lead input from ammunition was also found to be the main source of lead in venison. With regard to health risks, alternative ammunition materials such as copper or zinc are a better solution.

    “No more animal experiments in the wild!” – According to a questionnaire done by the Federal Hunting Association (DJV – Deutscher Jagdschutzverband) on hunting ammunition, 36% of hunters already using lead-free ammunition switched back to lead. They claim worse killing effect, poor shooting precision and the risk of ricochets associated with lead-free ammunition. The DJV is requesting standardised methods of testing for lead-free ammunitions associated with the most widely used hunting calibres. Given the apparent inadequacies of the currently available lead-free ammunition to replace lead varieties, their use can be equated to “experimentation on animals in the wild”.

    “Venison on the table once a week.” – The DJV urged hunters to clean venison more thoroughly, especially around the shot wounds. Venison Hygiene should form a special chapter in the hunting exam. Venison is nevertheless a very healthy source of protein and a high-quality food source.

    You can read the full press releases in German below:
    http://www.cic-wildlife.org/uploads/media/BfR_press_release.pdf
    http://www.cic-wildlife.org/uploads/...jv_summary.pdf


  2. #2
    SD Regular willie_gunn's Avatar
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    I received the same - a couple of interesting points, both on including cleaning venison in the hunting exam, and also the suitability (or otherwise) of lead-free ammunition.

    In the light of the recent media pick-up on cull numbers, it would be interesting to see how a headline like “No more animal experiments in the wild!” would go down in the UK.

    willie_gunn
    O wad some Power the giftie gie us to see oursels as ithers see us!

  3. #3
    High-jacking the post slightly, but considering I lived and stalked on an area where the restriction on the sale of sheep due to Chernobyl , was only lifted in the summer of 2012 a quarter of a century after the event, we were also advised that we should eat no more than I think it was 1 kilo of venison a month,( though I may be wrong on the exact amount) though there was no restriction on the sale of venison.

    Don't know how the powers that be decided on what was a safe amount to eat and why there was a restriction on sheep entering the food chain, but no restriction on the sale of venison, however be that as it may.

    Taking the above into consideration, I don't think I will be overly worried over the possibility of ingesting a little lead.
    Last edited by bogtrotter; 21-03-2013 at 10:57.

  4. #4
    I think that is still the case with wild boar across large parts of eastern Germany and probably other places too

  5. #5
    You need a bit of lead in your pencil, it don't work otherwise

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by bogtrotter View Post
    High-jacking the post slightly, but considering I lived and stalked on an area where the restriction on the sale of sheep due to Chernobyl , was only lifted in the summer of 2012 a quarter of a century after the event, we were also advised that we should eat no more than I think it was 1 kilo of venison a month,( though I may be wrong on the exact amount) though there was no restriction on the sale of venison.

    Don't know how the powers that be decided on what was a safe amount to eat and why there was a restriction on sheep entering the food chain, but no restriction on the sale of venison, however be that as it may.
    Very straightforward explanation.

    Chernobyl dumped massive amounts of radionuclides on parts of Cumbria and Wales, due to some very unfortunate weather patterns.

    Sheep ate the radioactive material which contaminated the soil and grass. They became sufficiently radioactive to exceed permissible levels. Startlingly so.

    Rather than destroy them and compensate the farmers, it was expedient to allow them to be sold, but only once they had been moved to none irradiated areas and given sufficient time to expel some of the radiation from their systems. Until they were just below the limit.

    It has taken until now for radioactive decay and other mechanisms to reduce the contamination in Cumbria to a level where the sheep are mostly not too contaminated. It will take millennia before the land returns to the normal background level.

    The "cooling off" period for the sheep obviously could not be applied to wild deer. Rather than admit the problem and scare the public, or destroy the venison and compensate the stalkers etc. the hot venison was allowed to enter the food chain. It was assumed that most consumers would not be eating reasonable quantities so the risk was low. If you were told to limit yourself to 1 kilo/month, then there was a very good reason you should have taken that warning seriously.

    As the other poster said, large parts of Europe are still excessively contaminated, and restrictions remain in place.

    BBC News - Chernobyl sheep controls lifted in Wales and Cumbria


    British Sheep vs. Chernobyl Radiation | mmmbitesizescience
    Last edited by Sharpie; 21-03-2013 at 22:24.

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