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Thread: 8x57JS or 7x64 ? which is best ?

  1. #1

    8x57JS or 7x64 ? which is best ?

    Good morning, following a discussion I had the other day with a friend I thought I'd ask for some opinions about the following calibres. The round is to be used on both Deer, Goats, and Boar in this country and abroad, does anyone have experience of using both the 7x64 and the 8x57 IS ? He already has a 6.5 x 55.
    My Lee loading manual doesn't seem to have any data on the 7x64 hence I can't compare the two. Looking at ballistic stats online they both seem to be in the same league with the 7x64 having just a little more going for it. The 8x57 IS also suffers from having been a military round and thus will be somewhat limited to which country's it can be used in.

    Kindest regards, Olaf

  2. #2
    Good cartridges both of them. Like you say the 7x64 being a non military cartridge is accepted in most countries it is probably flatter shooting also. Personally I would be happy using either cartridge.
    It's the calibre of the shooter that counts not the calibre of the rifle.

  3. #3
    no experience of the 7x64, but i was left an 8x57, and I love it. Sweeter to shoot than a .308, less meat damage and more reliable terminal ballistics than a .243. Not the flattest shooter, but fine out to 200 thus far.

    James

  4. #4
    I am a 8x57 fan and I also like the 280 Remington (very 7x64-ish) but were I in woodland areas and occasionally wanted heavy bullets, I'd get the 8x57. I have several that shoot bullets in the 170 to 225 grain weights very well.~Muir

  5. #5
    7x64 is a very nice round, flat shooting and pretty mild in terms recoil. But given that you friend already has a 6.5x55 there is a pretty big overlap. 8x57 as Muir says can shoot bigger bullets, but if I was your friend I might well also consider going up to the 9.3x62 which is ideal for boar and plains game, but possibly a bit big for every day use on deer and goats, but that's what the 6.5 is for.

  6. #6
    QUOTE=Heym SR20;549183]7x64 is a very nice round, flat shooting and pretty mild in terms recoil. But given that you friend already has a 6.5x55 there is a pretty big overlap. 8x57 as Muir says can shoot bigger bullets, but if I was your friend I might well also consider going up to the 9.3x62 which is ideal for boar and plains game, but possibly a bit big for every day use on deer and goats, but that's what the 6.5 is for.[/QUOTE]

    Gents ! Thank you, thank you, all good info, its great to get some thoughts on this. Sorry, my last post was a little unclear, the idea is to drop the 6.5x55 and have a one rifle solution for Deer, Goats,and Boar.
    In my opinion the 7x64 could be the best cal, I think that the fat bullets of the 8mm are a nice thing to have but will perhaps be a pain on longer shots on open ground, heigh seats etc. Any thoughts ? Is It a bitt too mild for driven boar ?

  7. #7
    I've used an 8mm for quite a few years now and it is a very dependable round for any species out here. It doesn't have the bullet selection that the 7mm's enjoy though. I've never owned a 7x64, but I have owned a few 280 rem ( one was marked 7 mm Remington Express ) it is an excellent round that, with well constructed bullets, will handle boar easily. Its not much help, but I'd be happy with either round. The 7mm does shoot flatter so it does have a slight advantage if long shots are a regular thing. Personally, I'd probably base my choice on ammo/ reloading component availability, as this seems to be a bit problematic in the UK.
    AB

  8. #8
    Ok. Part of my enthrallment with the 8x57 is that one of my favorite rifles, a Husqvarna 648 is chambered for it. Certainly one of the finest handling rifles I own and regulated for 196 grain RN bullets. It comes to the shoulder so nicely that it makes many of my newer guns seem ungraceful.~Muir

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by alberta boy View Post
    I've used an 8mm for quite a few years now and it is a very dependable round for any species out here. It doesn't have the bullet selection that the 7mm's enjoy though. I've never owned a 7x64, but I have owned a few 280 rem ( one was marked 7 mm Remington Express ) it is an excellent round that, with well constructed bullets, will handle boar easily. Its not much help, but I'd be happy with either round. The 7mm does shoot flatter so it does have a slight advantage if long shots are a regular thing. Personally, I'd probably base my choice on ammo/ reloading component availability, as this seems to be a bit problematic in the UK.
    AB
    This is good info, as I expected; its the component choice that looks to be the guiding factor here. We'll have a phone about and I'll see what brass can be sourced, I think the 7mm bullets will be an easy thing for him to get though.
    Anyway, thanks for the reply. If there is anyone with a 7x64 please do feel free to have your say !

  10. #10
    Olaf ,
    hope your all fit and well now ,my best mate uses his 7x64 for everything deer related and it has accounted for many foxs whilst out on the estate too .he doesn't reload and gets ammo fine in our area .it is a mannlicher classic half stock unmodded and I real sweet rifle .not massive meat damage no real recoil issues even without a mod and has accounted for 100's of deer from munty upto red .great cal .
    cheers
    ​doug

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