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Thread: the importance of level x hairs in your scope

  1. #1

    the importance of level x hairs in your scope

    if your like me you used to level your x hairs by eye and after a few tweeks and few mounts of the rifle "that will do"
    well I have news it wont do,we picked up a wheeler engineering level level level from Normn Clarks only 20 odd quid so worth a punt,you know how it is boys and toys you always have to buy something from a gun shop even if you don't need it.
    well let me just say we needed it.after a session adjusting or scopes which we thought were right,they wasn't and ended up a country mile out.
    after a quick adjustment the levelling devise the rifles needs re zeroing,well today I went out to check and the difference was unreal.
    from a perfectly zeroed rifle after the scope was levelled I was over 8 inch to the right and about .5 inch down.
    so after a little adjustment and a reset of my target turrets Iam ready to go once again,just a note for anyone who dials having a scope which isn't level will make a huge difference over distance.
    I will never mount a scope again without using this device.

  2. #2
    My third eye tactical mounts have a built in level, quite handy.

  3. #3
    Distinguished Member tartinjock's Avatar
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    Handy to know......

    As I have a Z6i which has the ballistic turret, I have not yet set it up, but intend to out to 450m (On a .270, so that distance will be fine). I was looking at >THESE< to ensure true horozontal/verticle was achieved.

    Has anyone used the Stoney point tool?

    TJ
    Position and hold must be firm enough to support the firearm
    The firearm must point naturally at the target without any undue physical effort
    Sight alignment (aiming) must be correct
    The shot must be released and followed through without disturbing the position

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by see it shoot it View Post
    from a perfectly zeroed rifle after the scope was levelled I was over 8 inch to the right and about .5 inch down.
    Goodness! What range was this at?
    If it was 100yds I'm not sure I'd notice 0.5" down so much, but the 8"right seems a tremendous shift. Is it possible that it is at least partly the result of loosening the mounts and wiggling the scope about?

    I'm interested, as I all my 'scopes are set supposedly-vertical without high-tech devices

  5. #5
    Distinguished Member Ronin's Avatar
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    I always use a level to set up a scope (or feeler gauges, but thats another principle)


    Once the rifles level I set the scope so I can see a plumb line and align the crosshair vertically with the plumb - simple...

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Redmist View Post
    I always use a level to set up a scope (or feeler gauges, but thats another principle)


    Once the rifles level I set the scope so I can see a plumb line and align the crosshair vertically with the plumb - simple...
    I use the plumb line method very effective indeed....

  7. #7
    Why is this news?

  8. #8
    Distinguished Member tartinjock's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MONGOOSE View Post
    I use the plumb line method very effective indeed....
    How do you know that the rifle is in the verticle/horizontal though?
    You could easilly have upto 5' tilt on the rifle and then set the scope up to a plumb line, which will then not be verticle/horizontal.

    TJ
    Position and hold must be firm enough to support the firearm
    The firearm must point naturally at the target without any undue physical effort
    Sight alignment (aiming) must be correct
    The shot must be released and followed through without disturbing the position

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by tartinjock View Post
    How do you know that the rifle is in the verticle/horizontal though?
    You could easilly have upto 5' tilt on the rifle and then set the scope up to a plumb line, which will then not be verticle/horizontal.

    TJ
    I wonder whether you do it with the bolt out, and set the scope to the line when the line appears vertically to bisect the bore? Certainly that's how the 'sheet of white paper on the floor' method which I use works.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by tartinjock View Post
    How do you know that the rifle is in the verticle/horizontal though?
    You could easilly have upto 5' tilt on the rifle and then set the scope up to a plumb line, which will then not be verticle/horizontal.

    TJ
    I've got a mini bubble level I put across the action I clamp the rifle in blocks so it can't move then mount the scope worked fine for many years

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