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Thread: Schmallenberg

  1. #1

    Schmallenberg

    I read an article recently saying that the above virus is now being noticed in the deer population. Has anyone seen eviddence of this and can anyone comment on how it will affect the preparation of the carcass for the food chain. The parent carcass not the affected offspring of course.

    There is a link to an article relating to the virus, but I can find little comment o nthe spread to the deer population.

    http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/...69.2012.738403

  2. #2
    It will have no effect on the food chain. SBV has not been recorded affecting humans, or, based on similar viruses, is it likely to. Infection is only by midge bite, hence no risk to humans from meat. A survey done in Belgium of 500 red and roe carcasses found evidence of SBV antibodies in deer. The defects seen in cattle and sheep probably will happen, but we are unlikely to see it as the offspring will be scavenged. A nice explanation of how roe kids are unlikely to be affected is below. (The placentome is the attachment of the placenta to the uterus)

    Because the virus can infect the fetus only after the first placentome has developed and because roe deer embryos remain in diapause until January (
    7
    ), it is unlikely that SBV has contaminated many roe deer fetuses. Because 90% of roe deer were already SBV positive in mid-December and because circulating antibodies prevent transplacental passage of the closest phylogenetic relatives of the virus (
    8
    ), we suggest that roe deer fetuses were probably not infected. On the contrary, red deer mate in September, and the first functional placentome is established by the end of October (
    9
    ); thus, 80% of pregnant red deer were exposed to the emerging virus when placental transfer was possible. Furthermore, 35% of pregnant red deer were infected in November and December, i.e., after establishment of the first placentome and before the fetus was immunocompetent. By extrapolating the rate of transplacental infection among cattle (
    6
    ), we determined that 28% of these pregnancies resulted in contamination of the fetus, i.e., 10%, of expected pregnancies. Because unrestricted replication of Simbu-like viruses occurs in the central nervous system of immunologically incompetent ruminant fetuses (
    1
    ), which can lead to a typical arthrogryposis/hydranencephaly syndrome, a 10% loss among fawns can be expected in 2012.

  3. #3
    I thought that was the case regarding spread to humans, but I just wandered what the butcher might think.

    I understand that it can cause difficulties during birth and may cause hte death of the mother, is there something that we as stalkers could do to lessen the impact of it spreading and the difficulties it causes?

    Good for Roe, but not so for Red. Is ther any statistics on the occurance of it in the wild deer population?

  4. #4
    UNlikely for the butcher to be concerned - the same risk (i.e. none) applies to beef and lamb.

    As stalkers, we can't do anything (nor is there much one can do other than vaccinate livestock)

    The paper I quoted from had figures of about 40% with positive samples

  5. #5
    I listened to the radio yesterday and there was a government press release saying that they did not consider it to be serious enough to make it a notifiable disease. I look forward to hearing more on this subject.

    ​Simon

  6. #6
    There is no point making it a notifiable disease because it has spread everywhere very quickly and as it is spread quickly by midges then there is no way of keeping the disease out.

    Section 161 of the Highways Act 1980 (England & Wales) makes it an offence to discharge a firearm within 50 ft of the centre of a highway with vehicular rights without lawful authority or excuse, if as a result a user of the highway is injured, interrupted or endangered.

  7. #7
    To my mind this is a red herring. We are only supposed to shoot does when the foetuses are small. We cannot test for the disease so how would we know the foetus has it? After the birth the offspring is most likely going to die and its mother will be 4 months or so before she can be shot so once again you just would not know.

    Dont worry about it

  8. #8
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    On the basis of the roe does I shot during March, in those that were carrying foeti they all appeared normal. Likewise with the muntjac.

    Having not seen Schmallenberg, would I be likely to notice the deformation at any stage of the foetus development, or typically is it not apparent until shortly before birth? Sorry if it's a stupid question, but I have no idea and am interested.

    willie_gunn
    O wad some Power the giftie gie us to see oursels as ithers see us!

  9. #9
    There is a letter in this week's Vet record detailing blood sampling of wild deer. Of 66 samples from East Anglia (varied species) approx 14 positive and 2 inconclusive (20%) This is lower than studies in continental Europe (43% and 49%). No foetal abnormalities found.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by shootingduckdog View Post
    To my mind this is a red herring. We are only supposed to shoot does when the foetuses are small. We cannot test for the disease so how would we know the foetus has it? After the birth the offspring is most likely going to die and its mother will be 4 months or so before she can be shot so once again you just would not know.

    Dont worry about it
    I was under the impression you should be able to see it in unborn Fawns/Kids as soon as they have limbs.

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