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Thread: roasting advice please

  1. #1

    roasting advice please

    looking for advice on roasting a roe shoulder on the bone,
    Never roasted really before never wanted to wreck decent meat but think I should start

    It weighs 2lb 1.7 oz

    Keep it simple guys..
    Temp?
    Middle o oven or top or bottom?
    Do I cover it oot leave uncovered?
    Do I need to wrap in bacon or similar due to leanness?

    All tips/ advice greatly appreciated

    Paul

  2. #2
    Wrapping it in bacon won't help much, but because of the leanness it benefits from marinading. Nothing complicated, but if you put it in a baking tray in the fridge for a day or two in a mix of wine, oil, chopped carrots and onions, a few herbs and some pepper, then turn it over once in a while, it won't dry out when you roast it. All you need to do then is pop it in the oven at about 200-220 degrees for 20 minutes, then turn it down to 160-180 for a further 20 minutes, let it rest for another 20-30 before carving it, and you're off. It would benefit from being served with a sauce. Because of its' lack of fat, it will produce very little gravy of its' own. If you're interested, I'll send you the recipe for sauce Grand Veneur, but I'll have to translate it first. Easy enough though.

  3. #3
    If its easy enough & not a hassle for you ... Would be great please
    Stick here I guess as well for everyone's benefit

    Thank you
    Paul

  4. #4
    the way i do mine is
    season the meat well with salt pepper i also use garlic cloves pushed into slits in the meat but its optional . cut up a load of veg ie carrots, onions ,celery that sort of thing a couple of bay leaves and a half bottle of red with some stock and slowly cook covered in a tray with foil the lower the temp the longer i cook so the meat is tender i find cooking a leg on the bone roe turns out more like lamb and people enjoy the roast this way ,atb wayne

    my gravy i just reduce the stock/redwine with heat and a little cornflour season to taste
    Last edited by mereside; 30-04-2013 at 13:28.

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  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by sauer View Post
    If its easy enough & not a hassle for you ... Would be great please
    Stick here I guess as well for everyone's benefit

    Thank you
    Paul

    +1

  6. #6
    Mereside

    What temps you using & how long ?

    Im just trying to gauge what everyone doing

    Paul

  7. #7
    depends on how much time i have sometimes do it in a slow cooker over 8 hours or i just put it in at 200 deg and then drop the temp right down and keep checking over a long period. The wife likes it slowly roasted but i tend to like my venison on the rare side but usually do a smaller piece for myself later on ,atb wayne ps the thing i would say is how do you like your meat cooking ?. most tend to go with low and slow heat or hot and quick either way so it doesnt toughen and dry out

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  8. #8
    SD Regular Mr. Gain's Avatar
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    I tend to roast game with a hot start at 220 degrees (fan oven so shelf doesn't matter) for 15-20 minutes, which gets the meat really hot and browns the outside. I should mention that I season it beforehand with salt, black pepper, some rosemary or mixed herbs, and a sprinkle of mace; sometimes I'll even smear it with a mixture of English mustard and garlic first.

    Then I pour 1/4 bottle of wine into the roasting tray, cover it up with foil, sealing it as tight as possible, drop the heat to 160 degrees and leave it for at least another 45 minutes and even as much as 90 minutes, but which point it is really falling off the bone, moist and tender as can be.

    The wine and juices are added to some stock and reduced to make the gravy while the meat is covered again with the foil and set aside to rest.

    It's not a method for lovers of pink meat, but it's reliably succulent and very forgiving as regards cooking time in the second phase.

    I'm sure you could do the veg in the same tin, but I prefer to do mine separately for more contrast in the flavours. Particularly good are parsnips, which I put in a roasting dish, season with salt, pepper and grated nutmeg, toss in a little olive oil, and sprinkle with dark cane sugar. These are then put in the oven and cooked in parallel with meat. After the first stage, they're given a good splash of balsamic vinegar, then covered up with foil and left to continue cooking until the meat is ready.

    Freshly steamed broccoli, beans or other greens complete the dish - they go on 5-10 minutes before the meat and parsnips come out. All together it makes for an easy, reliable, and very tasty treat.

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