Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13

Thread: murdered bucks

  1. #1

    murdered bucks

    came across these two bucks this year, first one at the end of April too far decayed to tell how it had died.
    The second one I found late May there where many puncture wounds to the head,neck and rib cage, I have heard of the term murder buck but have not come across it until this year






    During the rut I was out with a client when we came arcoss this buck in the same wood,it was chasing another buck off as you can see one tyne is about three and a half inchs longer than the other and neddel sharp, could this be my murder buck ?
    your thoughts please. Anthony



  2. #2
    Hi Anthony,this is what I would term a 'Murder Buck' as it has a fairly normal set of twigs,but,also has an extra single tine coming out forwards,so,if it was to engage another Buck the chances are it could do some serious damage..................

    I was out with a friend the other evening and he shot a Buck that had a hole punched through the top of his head,that luckily for him,was just under the skin,but that could of been a lot worse,and,just after that I shot this one that has just one twig having had the other one snapped off,so......was it him that snapped it off in the other ones head....we will never know,but they were off the same land....................

  3. #3
    Looks to me that the buck in the 1st pic has been trodden on by an elephant or about to be

    NELL

  4. #4
    I thought murder bucks simply had two straight 'twigs' for antlers, growing at the normal angle - some i've seen only have one tyne (mounted in an estate office where my friend shoots)....????

    With two straight twigs, they would engage - and 'run-them-through' so to speak?!?

    Tom

  5. #5
    Anthony
    From what i hav seen and witnessed
    a murder buck is just that
    a buck that commits murder because it knows it can
    normaly a middle aged buck with just straightish spikes and no tines
    as tines lock together whilst fighting so there-fore the antler rarely strikes the head area
    when a a buck with single spikes locks in with another buck, it then has a chance to strike the head area of the other buck, there-fore inflicting damage and able to make multiple strikes
    then as it strikes the other bucks body area the other buck ,
    IE: chest or neck has been puntured that will slow it up
    the buck learns from this
    and in future battles tends to make a bit more effort to go for the body as it knows what the result should be
    not every straight antler buck will turn into a murder buck thou
    this pic is a perfect example of a murder buck


    good age, tall antlered with basically single tined antler even thou from first glance we thought it was a youngster
    (how wrong can you be in the heat of the moment)
    but he was not a murder buck
    as he arrived on my ground late in the rut never being seen before except for the few brief weeks before he was culled
    here a better pic of him


    so in my mind he had been displaced by other males during the rut, that is why he arrived on my patch as he was not able to defend his own patch

    A murder buck often holds territory and the same one for many years even till it dies of old age in some cases
    if you hav such a buck it will be in the same area costantly from year to year and the results of it's action will be seen yearly
    this is defo one that you need to find and they often are the hardest to get to grips with

  6. #6
    As far as I know a murder buck is a buck with long single pair of tines.

    In other words a Roe deer version of a Red Switch.

  7. #7
    Hi Tommo,
    I thought this to, most of the bucks i see with twig like antlers are yearlings and go no where near the mature bucks and after the end of may have been driven out of our big woods into the feilds and hedgerows.
    I thought a murder buck was a mature buck with long single spikes or one much longer than the other and because he is a mature buck will stand and fight with other good bucks.
    as you can see from the pics both bucks found dead where 6 pointers.

    Anthony

  8. #8
    Hi Tommo,
    I thought this to, most of the bucks i see with twig like antlers are yearlings and go no where near the mature bucks and after the end of may have been driven out of our big woods into the feilds and hedgerows.
    I thought a murder buck was a mature buck with long single spikes or one much longer than the other and because he is a mature buck will stand and fight with other good bucks.
    as you can see from the pics both bucks found dead where 6 pointers.

    Anthony

  9. #9
    The switch type of roe are generally considered to be the ones doing the murdering due to the fact they the have nothing to stop their antlers penetrating almost to the bases.

  10. #10
    Surely any buck that kills another is guilty of murder by law!
    Where's legaleagle when you need him most?
    I think this one was more than capable of it. Although mature himself, he somehow displaced another large buck with a fine 6-point set which I never saw again!
    I reckon he was guilty and paid the penalty!

    I think two single spikes is the real definition.

Similar Threads

  1. still no bucks
    By bunnydan in forum Deer Stalking General
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 04-06-2009, 12:07
  2. Boar and Bucks
    By Bertram in forum Photos
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 15-05-2009, 09:39
  3. still no bucks
    By bunnydan in forum Deer Stalking General
    Replies: 17
    Last Post: 12-05-2009, 13:10
  4. no bucks
    By bunnydan in forum Deer Stalking General
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 26-04-2009, 13:10
  5. Where have all the bucks gone?
    By Nick Gordon in forum Deer Stalking General
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 27-05-2008, 07:30

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •