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Thread: Cutting Rides For Habitat Management / Deer

  1. #1

    Cutting Rides For Habitat Management / Deer

    Right guy's have been given the all clear to clear some spaces, cut some rides as required and put in any feeder's and high seats I want

    If you see this short clip it show's the type of terrain I am dealing with



    just looking for ways to improve the place

  2. #2
    ....good luck
    By three methods we may learn wisdom:
    First, by reflection, which is noblest;
    Second, by imitation, which is easiest;
    and third by experience, which is the bitterest

  3. #3
    Lloyd - you're clearly getting some light to the ground, so thats a good start.


    I'd be tempted to go in and open up some small coppice coupes - maybe 10m square, and get the old coppice stools back to production/growth

    then clear out a stalking path between them that takes you close enough to see and fire into the coupe without walking into it, thin the trees to give you a clean firing line.

    read this:

    http://www.forestry.gov.uk/pdf/fcpn6.pdf/$file/fcpn6.pdf

  4. #4
    As above, chainsaw, brushcutter, strimmer, don't forget to strim a path to the high seats, saves a lot of accidental noise. Where are you located, I might be able to do you a deal on the forestry work

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Labrat View Post
    Lloyd - you're clearly getting some light to the ground, so thats a good start.


    I'd be tempted to go in and open up some small coppice coupes - maybe 10m square, and get the old coppice stools back to production/growth

    then clear out a stalking path between them that takes you close enough to see and fire into the coupe without walking into it, thin the trees to give you a clean firing line.

    read this:

    http://www.forestry.gov.uk/pdf/fcpn6.pdf/$file/fcpn6.pdf

    After googling coppicing, I have a better idea now Cheers pal will have a good read

  6. #6
    Try and cut rides along existing deer tracks. Don't expect deer to use nice paths that you have cut especially for them to walk along - they won't!
    Try and find points were existing tracks cross which then effectively doubles your chances.
    Make sure seats are sited so that they are easy to get to quietly and suit the prevailing wind.
    Try to make the seat a bit like the hub of a wheel and have the shoot lanes extending away (like spokes).
    Have a couple of wider areas or glades which let loads of light in to encourage grass growth. These areas can also be used to site feeders or mineral lick posts.
    Look for natural 'choke points' which guide the deer into certain areas such as game pens, fences, ditches, gateways. You can always construct dead hedges to assist with this from areas cleared.
    Don't get too carried away either! The deer like thick areas as they give them shelter, protection and food. If you move the cover too much, you may also move the deer!
    It can help to put the seat up before cutting back too much. Then get up the seat and guide a friend to cut back bits which obstruct. It's often uneccessary to cut close to the seat as you will be looking over it anyway. Visual shoot lanes looking down into the cover are very effective whilst not creating too much disturbance.
    It's difficult to advise too much without seeing the problem, but that should give you a few basic ideas to be getting on with!
    Have fun!
    MS

  7. #7
    In South Wales Akeld, but if you make the trip down and bring all the chainsaws and tool's I'll let you kip on my sofa and cook you 3 meals a day till the jobs done ??

    Was worth a try

  8. #8
    what size chainsaw would be recommended ? can get all other things off my cousin's landscaping company

  9. #9
    Constructive comment: If you're asking what size chainsaw, then you probably shouldn't be using one

    You can fell stuff up to 3 or 4" diameter with a brush cutter, much safer, and easier on your back too.

    might be worth seeing what your local wildlife trust is doing, go along and give them a hand - its a great way of learning the basics of coppicing etc for the sake of a mornings work.

  10. #10
    You shouldn't need a chainsaw mate really. A decent pull saw and extending pole saw should do. Anything over I think 7cm thick requires a felling licence ?
    Bloody dangerous things too! You'd be a potential candidate for my worst stalking injury thread!
    MS

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