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Thread: Wooden Highseat - protection against rot

  1. #1

    Wooden Highseat - protection against rot

    I'm just installing a new wooden highseat (photo is work-in-progress so no smart comments ).

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I normally have metal ones so it's not ever an issue, but what do you guys use to protect the feet from rising rot (clearly this will be getting several coats of timber preservative and is already pressure treated)? I think I saw plastic shrink wrap stuff for fence posts once - anything similar/recommended?

    And if you fancy sitting in the finished product after a stalk through the wood for as little as 5 for 2 outings... 2 stalking outings



  2. #2
    I have (and have had) a few timber seats.

    I have never tried to cover the feet but always tried to place them on a rock so that they drain. I don't think it matters what you try to cover them with the water will get in - and then can't get out if you have plastic, roofing felt, etc. round them. Result - rot, eventually.

  3. #3
    Stand the legs in a tub of creosote & sump oil with a little kerosene for a week then mount on pieces of patio slab, I put a few up for someone 10 years ago like this & they are still there with no signs of rot, & if ever they do just trim the bottom & place another slab or a block under them.
    But treat yearly with creosote & sump oil.
    LET HE WHO IS WITHOUT SIN CAST THE FIRST STONE & PREVENTION IS BETTER THAN CURE!

  4. #4
    How much did that cost to make , and do you have any plans mate ?

    I'm looking to put one up very shortly

  5. #5
    Stand the feet on a round of timber. By that I mean cutting a end slice from a felled tree. This helps stop water absorption track up the ladder legs. Make sure the legs are free from brash and foliage as this traps moisture.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Lloyd90 View Post
    How much did that cost to make , and do you have any plans mate ?

    I'm looking to put one up very shortly
    All-in about 80. The timber was about 60 (7 lengths of 4.2m) plus a few bolts/coach bolts and bull wire to wire the rungs. The plans I'm afraid reside within my head but there are numerous posts on SD with similar design to mine - have a search - BASC also have a design on their site.

    The long sections are 4.2m so about 3.2m to the seat. Seat depth 60cm. Rung length 1.2m (and thus seat width also 1.2m). Sides of seat/shooting rail about 50cm above seat height.

    Still to go on to what you can see in the photo is back, sides and shooting rail.

  7. #7
    Pressure treatment can be a bit erratic, depending I think on the quality of timber used. I have always lashed on a few coats of wood paint. The one available from Aldi / Lidl are good although the gloss finish seems to be increasing. Any seats that I have built or refurbished in the last two years have had a base coat of creosote mixed wih 10% bituminous paint which gives a darker and faster drying finish. The feet get an extra couple of coats. I recently salvaged and refurbished a batch of metal fence post holders,(square frames on long shaped points) and am using them to support my lighter lean to seats. Not only do they keep the timber off wet ground but you gain about a foot of height as the post holder does not have to be flush with the ground, and if the ground is uneven you avoid driving one timber leg even further into the ground than usual.
    My local agri hardware is selling galvanised post holders for about 10 eu -half of what B+Q is charging for paint finished ones

  8. #8
    Pressure treatment uses salts, so I was informed by my buddy in the states and when he did garden furniture as a business the screws rusted out very fast. he sourced special treated screws a very complex thing.
    The use of fresh cut Douglas fir is the preffered way to go in Germany with the feet on old paving slabs ca. 30cm square seems to last a good 10 years.
    The creosote foot trick treatment is illegal ref the poisonous crap getting down into the ground water table but as its located in England and no one seems to give a s**t about that, carry on.

    Martin

  9. #9
    Martin,
    I think creosote has become a generic term like hoover. What I buy is called creocoat or something similar - as you infer the real thing has not been for sale for some years over here.
    Ion

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by kuwinda View Post
    I have (and have had) a few timber seats.

    I have never tried to cover the feet but always tried to place them on a rock so that they drain. I don't think it matters what you try to cover them with the water will get in - and then can't get out if you have plastic, roofing felt, etc. round them. Result - rot, eventually.
    Spot on 'Kuwinda' keep it dry not wrapped in plastic. Choose European Larch or Oak timber for the bits touching the ground as it'll be more weather resistant.

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