Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14

Thread: New Venison curing/smoking/processing book

  1. #1
    SD Regular willie_gunn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Oxfordshire, Wiltshire, Berkshire....and Sutherland
    Posts
    6,995
    View my Gallery (19)View my Gallery (19)

    New Venison curing/smoking/processing book

    For anyone interested (stone, basil, Tommo, jingzy??) I've just posted a short review of a new book on curing, smoking and processing bacon, sausage, paté, salami, etc. in the Recipes thread.

    A lot of the recipes can be adapted for venison, so great for those of us who process our own deer. It's just been published so nicely in time for Christmas! And no, I have no connection whatsoever with the author, publishers, etc.

    willie_gunn

  2. #2
    Nice one Willie, always worth looking for something different.
    basil.

  3. #3
    Started smoking my venison a few months ago.

    Have only smoked two roe haunches and one fallow.

    I use a hot water smoker and it seems pretty "idiot proof" so im doing ok so far but always room for improvement

    It adds a whole new dimension to cooking your own venison. I know some of you will have been smoking food for a long time, but its a learning curve for me.

    Does anyone on here hydrate there venison as I would like to make venison jerky but am not sure if the £200 + for a hydrater is worth it

    Your veiws appreciated

    Max

  4. #4
    SD Regular willie_gunn's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Location
    Oxfordshire, Wiltshire, Berkshire....and Sutherland
    Posts
    6,995
    View my Gallery (19)View my Gallery (19)
    Max

    I take it you mean de-hydrate, i.e. take all the moisture out?

    If so, I do have a purpose-built Excalibur dehydrator that I use when I'm making venison biltong, as well as when I'm drying pineapple, banana, raspberries, tomatoes, mushrooms, etc.

    To be honest I'd rate a de-hydrator as a "nice to have" unless you're into drying a lot of food. You can dry venison in anything from an oven/Aga to a drying box using a light bulb as a heat source.

    You can also try the African method of drying it outside, but I've found that the temperature here doesn't get hot enough whilst the humidity is too high, so the meat starts to go mouldy

    willie_gunn

  5. #5
    willie_gunn

    Thanks for the correction, yes I did mean de-hydrate.

    I looked at the Excalibur and if I go down the de-hydrate route thats what I will go for.

    We try and be as self sufficient as we can, Debs grows nearly all the salad and veg we eat (she is vegeterian) and I shoot almost all the meat I eat, so works well.

    We have a lot of seasonal fruit and that was another reason for wanting to try dehydrateing.
    You sound as though you have been doing this for quite a while, if you have any advice im all ears

    Max

  6. #6
    I was told by a South African that you can dry Biltong in a home made wooden box with a little computer fan.
    I make my own bacon and use dry cure salt, most butcher suppliers stock it, and it is very good.
    Smoking is best in a Bradley Smoker, although you can get smaller models and good saw dust from eBay. The correct saw dust is very important and it needs a tiny amount of moisture to help it to burn.
    Paul GAP180

  7. #7
    I've made several batches of biltong that has passed muster with a mate from Zimbabwe, so it must be fairly good. With this kind of thing it is as well to remember that it must be very simple as the guys out there don't generaly read recipe books. I use a fan heater set to cold, i.e. just the fan. Very understanding wife allows me to stretch strings of it across the dressing room. Good tip is to pull a string tight and hook your trimmed meat strips onto half opened paper clips one strip either side of the string. I've dried it out in Italy over a very low cool fire too. It takes on a fantastic smokey twang. Fair to say I rarely bring any home, it never gets past my hunting friends! You can freeze it once cured/dry so don't mess about with very small amounts, v
    do a good size batch.

  8. #8

    New Venison smoking/curing/processing book

    Hi Willie, Have put the book on my Christmas list.
    Last year I smoked a haunch. I over did it and it turned out very dry. My son-in-law suggested soaking it in something alcoholic and I decided that a 50/50 port and whiskey mix would be worth a try. It went in the chiller for 4 weeks and was then hung to dry. Oh Boy did this do the trick.

  9. #9
    You people really know how to get a wobble going when someone is desperately trying to lose weight!

  10. #10

    New Venison smoking/curing/processing book

    Hi Willie, Have put the book on my Christmas list.
    Last year I smoked a haunch. I over did it and it turned out very dry. My son-in-law suggested soaking it in something alcoholic and I decided that a 50/50 port and whiskey mix would be worth a try. It went in the chiller for 4 weeks and was then hung to dry. Oh Boy did this do the trick.

Similar Threads

  1. Curing Venison.....
    By willie_gunn in forum Carcass Prep, Butchery & Recipes
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 20-05-2010, 13:59
  2. Processing and selling venison
    By Huntingstella in forum Deer Stalking General
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 02-09-2009, 16:40
  3. DSC1 BOOK
    By amber243 in forum Deer Stalking General
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 18-03-2009, 19:35
  4. book / info on types of cut for venison
    By david1976 in forum Carcass Prep, Butchery & Recipes
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 01-12-2008, 19:59
  5. Book Sale
    By sp4rkman in forum Deer Stalking General
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 15-08-2008, 08:55

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •