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Thread: powder burn rate

  1. #1

    powder burn rate

    I got some reloading gear from a mate and in it was a full tin of Nobel rifle No.0 with NL9877 stamped on it. I cant find any reference to this powder in my Hornady reloading manual or any equivalent. I would like to know if it is a slow burning powder that I can use for the 30.06 or will I have to use it for the .17 REM and .222?

  2. #2

  3. #3
    It's right next to H414 on the slow side and just a tad faster than TU5000 Vectan.~Muir

    (And with no data available, why don't you shake it out on the lawn? You just can't always safely make random substitutions based on burning rate alone. I probably have data but it will be old, and therefore suspect. I can look if you want....)
    Last edited by Muir; 11-08-2013 at 03:40.

  4. #4
    I think Nobel haven't made powder for a very long time....certainly not since their factory in Scotland shut down.
    ​But, if the tin is sealed and has been kept in reasonable condition the powder may still be OK...However, is it really worth the risk?
    ​You'll know if it's gone 'off' by the acetic whiff from the product in the tin. ATB
    Blaser K95 Luxus Kipplaufbüchse .25-06Rem. Zeiss 8x56, 110gn Nosler Accubond = Game Over!

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Muir View Post
    ...(And with no data available, why don't you shake it out on the lawn? You just can't always safely make random substitutions based on burning rate alone. I probably have data but it will be old, and therefore suspect....)
    This is the correct answer.

    For the sake of the price of a tub of powder, I would not mess about with an unknown powder that I did not have load data for.
    Brian.

    Just because you are paranoid, doesn't mean they aren't out to get you......

  6. #6
    Try this list http://www.reloadersnest.com/burnrates.asp (number 207).

    As deeangeo says Nobel of Glasgow powders haven't been made for the last 20 odd years but turn up fairly regularly, indeed there have been several questions on this site regarding these powders over the last few years just do a site search to find some data that has been placed on the site. Personally I would have no hesitation in using these powders if I could ascertain that they have been stored correctly as they were great powders and great value for money at the time. I still can't force myself to throw out the old Nobel reloading manual. A very sad loss when the plant was shut down.
    It's the calibre of the shooter that counts not the calibre of the rifle.

  7. #7
    +1

    find a plank of wood draw your house name/number with the powder and set fire to the powder nail on the wall and put it down to life


    Quote Originally Posted by Claret_Dabbler View Post
    This is the correct answer.

    For the sake of the price of a tub of powder, I would not mess about with an unknown powder that I did not have load data for.

  8. #8
    you tight welshman bin it ,i got rid of my unopened rusty full tubs of GM3 !! still burnt well but would i pull the trigger on it nahh but oooohhh hot hot bright light hot hot

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by GOLLY View Post
    I got some reloading gear from a mate and in it was a full tin of Nobel rifle No.0 with NL9877 stamped on it. I cant find any reference to this powder in my Hornady reloading manual or any equivalent. I would like to know if it is a slow burning powder that I can use for the 30.06 or will I have to use it for the .17 REM and .222?
    <>

    It's one of a series of 'Nobel-Glasgow' powders produced by a subsidiary of ICI Plc - manufactured in Steventston, Glasgow from 1974 to 1980. They are all tubular single-based powders rumoured to be made for Dupont USA - repackaged and sold as IMR powders.

    'NL9877' stamped on the can is manufacture date 9.8.1977, The batch no is on a yellow label - if still present.

    There were 4 in the series ranging - the slowest Nobel No. 0 (which you have) is for .243 to .270 - in the Vit N160 to Norma 204 class

    No. 1 - Vit. N140 to IMR 4064 equivalent - .308
    No. 2 - Vit. N135 to IMR 3031 equivalent - .22-250 to .308 (lighter bullets)
    No.3 - Vit. N133 - exact equivalent - so is perfect for .222 to .223


    I've used all of these, and last used No. 0 (1976 manufacture) in 2004 and the last of No. 3 (made 1978) in 2011. If you weren't the other side of the world I'd buy this off you.

    To be on the safe side for Nobel 0 use loads for the slightly faster IMR 4350. It's a very good powder.
    If I'm going to be accused of it then it's just as well I did it.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by paul o' View Post
    you tight welshman bin it ,i got rid of my unopened rusty full tubs of GM3 !! still burnt well but would i pull the trigger on it nahh but oooohhh hot hot bright light hot hot
    Who are you calling a Welshman. I happen to be from Monmouthshire so neither English nor Welsh, though I was a new Australian once.
    It's the calibre of the shooter that counts not the calibre of the rifle.

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