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Thread: 50 meters

  1. #1

    50 meters

    If i was to zero a 243 using sako gamehead 100gr at 50 meters and my point of aim is bang centre of the target, where should my rounds be landing to be and difference's in drop at different ranges please
    G

  2. #2
    An interesting question. Hard to answer without knowing:
    1. How fast the bullet is going at the muzzle
    2. How high the scope is above the bore line

    If you know these things, and that the BC of the bullet is 0.367, then the info can be fed into a ballistic calculator (Norma's is my favourite http://ballistics.norma.cc/javapage_US2.asp?Lang=2 ) for some reasonable guesses.

    The SAKO data gives mv from a 23.5" barrel as 2969fps, and using that data with a 'sopes hight of 1.6" above the bore line you'd be about zeroed at 150yds.

    Have a play...

  3. #3
    http://www.sako.fi/pdf/datatables/Sa...atable2013.pdf
    50, 100, 150 200, 250, 300
    0.3, 2.1, 0, -6.0, -16.6, -32.3

    m/cm

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by bewsher500 View Post
    http://www.sako.fi/pdf/datatables/Sa...atable2013.pdf
    50, 100, 150 200, 250, 300
    0.3, 2.1, 0, -6.0, -16.6, -32.3

    m/cm
    Metric, eh? Very modern!

  5. #5
    Frankly quite irrelevant in most stalking situations, because:

    1. The point blank zero of a typical 100Gr .243W is between 50 and 160 yards (when zeroed at 100 yards)- with other words the bullet will hit where your cross hairs are when you pull then trigger.
    2. Most (lowland/woodland) deer are shot at 40-60 yards.
    3. Hitting it broadside within a 6" circle from the center of the killing-point will still kill it.

    Therefore any rifle that 'groups' at 2-3" at 100 yards will be perfectly adequate to kill most deer in most situations.
    Yes, it is wonderful if you 'print' sub 0.5" groups at 100 Yards, but is it really necessary? No. Focus on getting closer, and your rifle's accuracy is really not an issue. And when you can take a shot you often don't have time for all those mental calculations of hold-over or hold-under etc, all nice on the range but in a stalking situation you need to point and shoot without all that malarkey.
    • Do not be seduced by the marketing-men....

  6. #6
    zeroing at 25 or 50 yards is Ok to get into the ball park but you need to actually shoot at 100 yards
    to see whats really happening .The first zero point depends a lot on the height of the scope.
    so at 5 yards your bullet might be 1.5 to 2 inches low.


    you can zero at 100 yards, or, for longer ranges, get your bullets hitting 1.5 inches high at 100 yards

  7. #7
    My 308 with 150 grain bullets was absolutely spot on at 40 yards and exactly 1 inch high at 100 when I did my skills test last week

  8. #8
    in my 270 with my 140gn barnes load , 1" high @ 50yds = flat out zero at 180 and can still break a 4" clay out to 230+ yds .

    why zero @ 50 yds ? because i can zero at home in my back yard , it doesnt half make life easier !

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  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Erik Hamburger View Post
    Frankly quite irrelevant in most stalking situations, because:

    1. The point blank zero of a typical 100Gr .243W is between 50 and 160 yards (when zeroed at 100 yards)- with other words the bullet will hit where your cross hairs are when you pull then trigger.
    2. Most (lowland/woodland) deer are shot at 40-60 yards.
    3. Hitting it broadside within a 6" circle from the center of the killing-point will still kill it.

    Therefore any rifle that 'groups' at 2-3" at 100 yards will be perfectly adequate to kill most deer in most situations.
    Yes, it is wonderful if you 'print' sub 0.5" groups at 100 Yards, but is it really necessary? No. Focus on getting closer, and your rifle's accuracy is really not an issue. And when you can take a shot you often don't have time for all those mental calculations of hold-over or hold-under etc, all nice on the range but in a stalking situation you need to point and shoot without all that malarkey.
    I don't agree with much of this at all. I suggest you try pursuing small roe deer (5kg - 8kg larder weight) on a clear fell in the wintertime. I've been zeroing 1 inch high at 100 yds since the late 1960's and it's an approach that's served me well. Regards JCS

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Erik Hamburger View Post
    Frankly quite irrelevant in most stalking situations, because:

    1. The point blank zero of a typical 100Gr .243W is between 50 and 160 yards (when zeroed at 100 yards)- with other words the bullet will hit where your cross hairs are when you pull then trigger.
    2. Most (lowland/woodland) deer are shot at 40-60 yards.
    3. Hitting it broadside within a 6" circle from the center of the killing-point will still kill it.

    Therefore any rifle that 'groups' at 2-3" at 100 yards will be perfectly adequate to kill most deer in most situations.
    Yes, it is wonderful if you 'print' sub 0.5" groups at 100 Yards, but is it really necessary? No. Focus on getting closer, and your rifle's accuracy is really not an issue. And when you can take a shot you often don't have time for all those mental calculations of hold-over or hold-under etc, all nice on the range but in a stalking situation you need to point and shoot without all that malarkey.
    what a load of crap,accuracy kills not guesswork
    if you can only manage 2/3 inch groupings you shouldn't be shooting at anything alive

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