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Thread: A & X Bolt trigger systems

  1. #1

    A & X Bolt trigger systems

    Can anyone please tell me if there are any problems adjusting the triggers on a Browning A or X Bolt.

    I am definitely going to purchase one of these models very soon but iv'e heard conflicting stories about trigger creep and adjustment. I like a light trigger around 2 1/2 lb are they both capable of this adjustment ??

    Thanks in advance,

    sjb.

  2. #2
    my .223 x bolt broke 3.5lbs fully adjusted, it did break clean with no creep, but like you I prefer a 2.5lb pull.
    I ended up stripping the trigger down and clipping 2 coils off the spring and it works a treat between 2 and 2.5lbs now. (I did take a single coil off at first but it was 3lbs+). do check for slam firing on completion though copied you this if you plan on doing it yourself.
    Paul/sinbad
    No.12. Browning X-Bolt Install a Light Trigger Spring









    Picture #1
    The first step necessary to replace the X-Bolt trigger spring is to remove the trigger assembly from the receiver. Do this by driving out the 2 pins seen at the top of the trigger housing. These pins have serrations on the ends that we see in this picture. Therefore, they must be driven out from the other side, as shown by the punch in the next picture.
















    Picture #2





    The punch is shown driving out the front trigger housing retaining pin. Drive both the front and the rear pin out from this side.

















    Picture #3

    Picture #3 shows the X-Bolt trigger assembly sufficiently disassembled to replace the trigger weight of pull spring. Also shown are the tools necessary to do this.
    After removing the trigger assembly from the receiver, remove the sear and the cone shaped sear spring, by driving out the sear pivot pin. This pin is just in front of the safety button.
    Near the center of the trigger housing, you will see the actuator pivot pin. Drive this pin out just far enough to release the actuator, but not all the way out of the trigger housing. Now It will be necessary to move the actuator slightly to the rear and down, so that better access to the trigger spring can be had. After making this move, a small part of the actuator can be seen protruding from the bottom of the trigger housing, just in front of the trigger.
    The new spring is shown on an angle at the lower front corner of the trigger housing. It is pointing at the hole in the housing through which it must be inserted. I use a combination of the pictured tools to work the spring into place. The lower end of the spring must fit down into the housings spring pocket, which is located directly above the allen head weight of pull adjusting screw.
    Complete the installation of the spring by moving the actuator back into its original position, above the upper end of the newly installed trigger spring, and with its pivot hole aligned with the pivot pin. Tap the pivot pin back into place, and install the weight of pull adjusting screw. Verify that the actuator is now powered by the trigger spring and moves smoothly.














    Picture #4


    Trigger assembly being installed on receiver, Tap trigger assembly retaining pins in from this side, with serrated end of pin up. With rifle assembled, but un-loaded, check for reliable function of the trigger, the safety, and the bolt lock.







    To Purchase these springs, click on this link: Trigger Springs for Rifles

    No liability is expressed or implied for damage or injury which may result from the improper installation or use of this product.


    (For information only do not add to cart)





    Forgot to add, i have an a bolt as well, but it is the european model with the set trigger so no problems with that one.
    Last edited by sinbad; 05-11-2013 at 18:43.
    I wish I was half the hunter my dog thinks I am

  3. #3
    The short answer is no they don't adjust enough, you will need to modify them.
    You can buy a set of Timney springs for the A bolt, but not cheap
    The same for the x-bolt is no longer available.
    You can, and I did cut the spring down for my x bolt, ended up with a 1 3/4lb trigger, very nice it was as well.
    I did do a post on how to do the x bolt on here, with destructions in a step by step, i'm sure a search will find it.

    Neil.

  4. #4
    Sinbad & Hornet 6

    Thank you both so very much for the very detailed advice and instructions.

    ​That has certainly answered my questions.

  5. #5
    I replaced the spring on my A-Bolt it made all the difference in the world. Attempts at altering the original spring didn't give the result I wanted but the replacement spring certainly works.
    It's the calibre of the shooter that counts not the calibre of the rifle.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by sinbad View Post
    my .223 x bolt broke 3.5lbs fully adjusted, it did break clean with no creep, but like you I prefer a 2.5lb pull.
    I ended up stripping the trigger down and clipping 2 coils off the spring and it works a treat between 2 and 2.5lbs now. (I did take a single coil off at first but it was 3lbs+). do check for slam firing on completion though copied you this if you plan on doing it yourself.
    Paul/sinbad
    No.12. Browning X-Bolt Install a Light Trigger Spring









    Picture #1
    The first step necessary to replace the X-Bolt trigger spring is to remove the trigger assembly from the receiver. Do this by driving out the 2 pins seen at the top of the trigger housing. These pins have serrations on the ends that we see in this picture. Therefore, they must be driven out from the other side, as shown by the punch in the next picture.
















    Picture #2





    The punch is shown driving out the front trigger housing retaining pin. Drive both the front and the rear pin out from this side.

















    Picture #3

    Picture #3 shows the X-Bolt trigger assembly sufficiently disassembled to replace the trigger weight of pull spring. Also shown are the tools necessary to do this.
    After removing the trigger assembly from the receiver, remove the sear and the cone shaped sear spring, by driving out the sear pivot pin. This pin is just in front of the safety button.
    Near the center of the trigger housing, you will see the actuator pivot pin. Drive this pin out just far enough to release the actuator, but not all the way out of the trigger housing. Now It will be necessary to move the actuator slightly to the rear and down, so that better access to the trigger spring can be had. After making this move, a small part of the actuator can be seen protruding from the bottom of the trigger housing, just in front of the trigger.
    The new spring is shown on an angle at the lower front corner of the trigger housing. It is pointing at the hole in the housing through which it must be inserted. I use a combination of the pictured tools to work the spring into place. The lower end of the spring must fit down into the housings spring pocket, which is located directly above the allen head weight of pull adjusting screw.
    Complete the installation of the spring by moving the actuator back into its original position, above the upper end of the newly installed trigger spring, and with its pivot hole aligned with the pivot pin. Tap the pivot pin back into place, and install the weight of pull adjusting screw. Verify that the actuator is now powered by the trigger spring and moves smoothly.














    Picture #4


    Trigger assembly being installed on receiver, Tap trigger assembly retaining pins in from this side, with serrated end of pin up. With rifle assembled, but un-loaded, check for reliable function of the trigger, the safety, and the bolt lock.







    To Purchase these springs, click on this link: Trigger Springs for Rifles

    No liability is expressed or implied for damage or injury which may result from the improper installation or use of this product.


    (For information only do not add to cart)





    Forgot to add, i have an a bolt as well, but it is the european model with the set trigger so no problems with that one.
    great diagram & plan of action. Thank You

  7. #7
    Thank you 8 x 57, I think I will go for the A Bolt model and buy the spring, apparently they come in pairs from Timney. One is very light 1 1/2 -2 lb pull and the other 2-3 lb.

    sjb1956

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