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Thread: Best Practice or not.

  1. #1

    Best Practice or not.

    When i started deer stalking i read books by Richard Prior Guy Wallace and a few others all had good ideas on training dogs for deer More recently we have all been given Best Practice to read for guidance. These should give us Dogs that could be used through out the stalk and have an extremely high success rate. Now the types of dogs have changed somewhat with the introduction of more breeds from across the water. Hounds Wire Viz and others should we look at our training techniques or are we happy with what has been given to us.


  2. #2
    Davie,

    I think dogs can be equated to cameras, you get the point and shoot variety, then you get what are known as bridge cameras and then you get DSLR's.

    Point and shoot. Will just need the owner to point it at a subject, press the shutter and the camera does the rest and produces a photograph. Now your average "pet" dog owner will love and cherish their dog, feed and exercise it and they will both be happy, every now and again the dog will assume the role of hunter, when it finds something to chase, nature kicks in and we end up with a "Benson" type scenario, hilarious, potentially dangerous and distressing to the prey.

    Bridge models. Your average family pet that also doubles as a working dog, or a working dog that doubles as a family pet. This is where the dog is trained to a higher degree than a pet requires in order to find a wounded beast, retrieve a bird, beating etc. The next rung up the ladder. There is input from the owner handler above and beyond the point and shoot, but falls short of the DSLR maqnual mode operator.

    DSLR. Top of the tree models, these models have a array of buttons that mean they can be used as a point and shoot or a bridge model or put in full manual mode where the operator requires certain skills that have to be learnt in order to get the best from the camera, which can be seen in the results. This is where the highly trained, for a specific job, type of dog fits, They are capable of being a superb family pet plus when together with a trained handler working as a team are capable of finding/tracking game where others might fail. Just as a professional photographer may well get the photo where the others might fail, because they have the expertise and equipment.

    Now as far as I can see there is nothing wrong with all three categories, they are different certainly but as with cameras what everyone chooses to use is a personal choice. Now I can understand that one type may not wish to adopt the practices of another, fine all normal and the fact that discussion over the differences arise is also fine and normal. What is not fine and normal is the fact that these difference cannot, or that does at least appear to be the case, be discussed without degenerating into a slanging match.

    There does appear to be, well to me anyway, much that may be learnt on these type of threads and I quite like to learn. In answer to your question I shall speak to Alex in the week about it and see if it is feasible or not.

    John
    A clever man knows his strengths, a wise man knows his weaknesses

  3. #3
    John a very good post and one that will i am sure tell everyone where we are.
    Me i am a bridge type person but a very good bridge camera (NIKON ) LOL.
    I am the sam with my dogs they are versatile deer dogs and a very good one (BMH).
    My rifles are the same point and shoot nothing fancy but do the job i want very well.They are good bridge rifles (SAUER Tikka)

    No need for a fancy rifle like a straight pull takedown type thats just taking it to far.
    Last edited by 6pointer; 30-11-2013 at 14:55.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by JAYB View Post
    Davie,

    I think dogs can be equated to cameras, you get the point and shoot variety, then you get what are known as bridge cameras and then you get DSLR's.

    Point and shoot. Will just need the owner to point it at a subject, press the shutter and the camera does the rest and produces a photograph. Now your average "pet" dog owner will love and cherish their dog, feed and exercise it and they will both be happy, every now and again the dog will assume the role of hunter, when it finds something to chase, nature kicks in and we end up with a "Benson" type scenario, hilarious, potentially dangerous and distressing to the prey.

    Bridge models. Your average family pet that also doubles as a working dog, or a working dog that doubles as a family pet. This is where the dog is trained to a higher degree than a pet requires in order to find a wounded beast, retrieve a bird, beating etc. The next rung up the ladder. There is input from the owner handler above and beyond the point and shoot, but falls short of the DSLR maqnual mode operator.

    DSLR. Top of the tree models, these models have a array of buttons that mean they can be used as a point and shoot or a bridge model or put in full manual mode where the operator requires certain skills that have to be learnt in order to get the best from the camera, which can be seen in the results. This is where the highly trained, for a specific job, type of dog fits, They are capable of being a superb family pet plus when together with a trained handler working as a team are capable of finding/tracking game where others might fail. Just as a professional photographer may well get the photo where the others might fail, because they have the expertise and equipment.

    Now as far as I can see there is nothing wrong with all three categories, they are different certainly but as with cameras what everyone chooses to use is a personal choice. Now I can understand that one type may not wish to adopt the practices of another, fine all normal and the fact that discussion over the differences arise is also fine and normal. What is not fine and normal is the fact that these difference cannot, or that does at least appear to be the case, be discussed without degenerating into a slanging match.

    There does appear to be, well to me anyway, much that may be learnt on these type of threads and I quite like to learn. In answer to your question I shall speak to Alex in the week about it and see if it is feasible or not.

    John
    Spot on John.....Davie you digging at blasers there,tut tut

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  5. #5
    Yep, I agree that Johns analogy is very good. And let's be honest, if you were wanting a professional image of your lovely kids or grandchildren to cherish in the coming years, such is the importance of capturing that moment, would you use the point and shoot approach, or go with the professional alternative???????

  6. #6
    Well Brian why did you buy a polaroid .
    Ok all kidding aside this was not about the dogs but about the training we give our dogs. Should the R. Prior G.Wallace and BP be rewritten to include new information.
    The Blazer anailigy was just to say somtimes we want something because we like it.It dose the same job as a Bridge rifle but hey you only live once.
    Brian i used a pro camera man for my kids when they were small once. Do you think i should have bought his camera and done it myself. No chance of that i will have fun with my pocket camera.

    A picture paints a thousand words.

    Last edited by 6pointer; 30-11-2013 at 19:16.

  7. #7
    [QUOTE=6pointer;691436]Well Brian why did you buy a polaroid .
    Ok all kidding aside this was not about the dogs but about the training we give our dogs. Should the R. Prior G.Wallace and BP be rewritten to include new information.
    The Blazer anailigy was just to say somtimes we want something because we like it.It dose the same job as a Bridge rifle but hey you only live once.
    Brian i used a pro camera man for my kids when they were small once. Do you think i should have bought his camera and done it myself. No chance of that i will have fun with my pocket camera./QUOTE]

    G.Wallace's little booklet was one the first and a good guide it was back in the day, but things have moved on in the way training is done now as people wont to know more...

    Should the best practice guide be rewritten? my own thought's are yes....

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