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Thread: Melissa Bachman

  1. #1

    Melissa Bachman

    To All: An American Huntress and TV wildlife personality has sparked global outrage for posting a picture of herself gloating over a dead lion on Facebook. Just wondering what you people think of these American TV hunters who travel the world, and blast their photos and videos over the net and on TV....and make a lot money doing it? Real sportsman / Jaegers? Do they do more harm than good? I am American so speak the truth, and don't worry about offending me.

    This has been talked about on national news in the States and has sparked a debate on hunting ethics, and putting the lion under protection of the Endangered Species Act. I am not trying to spark any controversy; I am really interested in your opinions, as you don't have the outdoor channels that we have. Bachman is from Minnesota and started out as a bow hunter, and I enjoyed watching her, as I really learned something. But did she step over the line throwing on makeup, possibly a St Tropez tan and advertising her killing of a lion?

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    TV presenter Melissa Bachman sparks outrage with photo of dead lion she 'stalked and killed'

    Melissa Bachman's African lion hunt draws anger

    The public is in uproar over photos of TV personality Melissa Bachman posing with a hunted lion carcass. The backlash comes right as the US considers whether to list the African lion as an endangered species.

    By Amelia Pak-Harvey, Staff writer / November 21, 2013

    As the US debates whether to list African lions as endangered, a photo of an American hunter and her lion trophy has sparked a record-breaking petition on Change.org.

    Celebrity hunter Melissa Bachman, who stars in "Winchester Deadly Passion" on the Pursuit Channel, posted photos on Facebook of her latest kills – which includes an African lion.

    The photo drew heaps of criticism from the Internet, provoking the largest animal-related petition on Change.org.
    "Melissa Bachman has made a career out of hunting wildlife for pure sport," petition creator Elan Burman writes. The petition calls on South African officials to deny Bachman future entry into the country and has gathered more than 350,000 signatures.

    "She is an absolute contradiction to the culture of conservation this country prides itself on," the petition continues. "Her latest Facebook post features her with a lion she has just executed and murdered in our country."
    The backlash comes as the US debates whether to list African lions as an endangered species. The species is protected under an international agreement known as the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species. Because of this, the US requires a permit from the exporting country in order to import a lion carcass. The national Fish and Wildlife Service also requires an import permit for any animal on the CITES list.

    But because African lions aren't protected under the Endangered Species Act, it's still perfectly legal to import, own, or even eat lions, as long as you have the right permit. (US restaurants have featured lion tacos and skewers in the past – despite public criticism.)

    Last year, the Service announced a year-long status assessment of the animal after a petition highlighted the US as the number one importer of lion parts. Between 1999 and 2008, the US imported 62 percent of all internationally traded lion specimens (parts or whole of a lion that's dead or alive), according to the petition.

    The Service will issue a finding as early as January that could ultimately land the lion on an endangered or threatened list. If listed, the lions will gain a few more protections, making it illegal to "kill, trap, capture, or collect" them.
    In a statement on a Facebook post that has since been taken down, the conservancy that helped Bachman with the hunt is not apologizing.

    "We do ethical hunting and all meat from animals hunted is distrubuted [sic] to the local community," Maroi Conservancy says in the post. "Funds generated from hunting goes towards fixing the border fence that was washed away in the 2013 floods; combating poaching which is excessive in this area due to close proximity to Zimbabwe and running a sustainable conservancy."

    The conservancy says it did not receive money for Bachman's hunt, and instead helped her find an outfitter who could set up a lion hunt for her.

    Sustainability through population control is a typical argument for proponents of trophy hunting, who also claim other benefits to the host country. GoDaddy CEO Bob Parsons was criticized for killing an elephant in Zimbabwe defended his hunt, telling CNN that he helped local farmers whose crops were being destroyed by the animal. And last month, a Texas hunting club auctioned off the opportunity to hunt an endangered black rhino, reasoning that killing one problematic rhino might save the rest of the herd while also raising money for conservation efforts.

    Tanzania's department of wildlife also claims that through certain tourist hunting projects, "communities receive tangible economic benefits from the legal utilization of wildlife."

    "For tourist hunting conducted within Game Controlled Areas and open areas, the Department sees great potential for providing considerable benefits to local people and involving them more fully in conservation activities," the director of wildlife wrote in a paper.

    Yet public outrage in the US still holds significant weight over the practice – a previous Change.org petition called on National Geographic to drop Bachman from its Ultimate Survivor Alaska show because of her reputation as a trophy hunter. In less than 24 hours, the network did.
    Last edited by Sidewinder; 04-12-2013 at 10:11.

  2. #2
    Each to their own but shooting Leo, trumpton, or any of the large African
    species isn't my cup of tea ... Saying that I appreciate that by offering them
    as sporting opportunities brings in much needed funds, which in turn goes towards
    the conservation of the species as a whole.
    Last edited by Cadex; 04-12-2013 at 12:14.

  3. #3
    I have seen the storm cloud gathering about her at the moment and can only say those that are complaining have no idea as to how wildlife and in particular the wildlife of South Africa is managed and needs to be managed. What a wonderful world we would live in if everything was like we dreamed and imagined it would be; but it isn't. Put fences up and fill them with predators and prey, and both groups will need management. She is one of many hunters who go to South Africa every year and plough thousands of pounds into the economy and in particular into nature conservation. Without this money coming in through hunters the money from wildlife tours would not be enough to sustain it. By her actions and other like her, she is the face and future of conservation. The fact she publishes what she does has been her downfall in this instance, perhaps the message needs to be stronger on the benefits of shooting for conservation.

  4. #4
    My only thought is the composition and 'mood' of this picture demonstrates a serious lack of imagination on behalf of both hunter and photographer.

    K

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Cadex View Post
    Each to their own but shooting Leo, trumpton, or any of the large African
    species isn't my cup of tea ... Saying that I appreciate that by offering them
    as sporting opportunities bring in much needed funds, which goes towards
    the conservation of the species as a whole.
    +1

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Sidewinder View Post
    To All: An American Huntress and TV wildlife personality has sparked global outrage for posting a picture of herself gloating over a dead lion on Facebook. Just wondering what you people think of these American TV hunters who travel the world, and blast their photos and videos over the net and on TV....and make a lot money doing it? Real sportsman / Jaegers? I am American so speak the truth.

    -Z



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    TV presenter Melissa Bachman sparks outrage with photo of dead lion she 'stalked and killed'


    20 Nov 2013 08:13
    Melissa Bachman posted a picture on Facebook of her posing next to the animal, saying she had an "incredible" day hunting

    A TV wildlife presenter is facing a barrage of criticism after posing with a lion she claimed to have shot during a hunt in South Africa.

    Melissa Bachman - who presents American hunting show Winchester Deadly Passion - posted a picture on her Facebook account which showed her holding a gun and smiling next to the apparently dead male lion.

    The image was posted along with the message: "An incredible day hunting in South Africa! Stalked inside 60-yards on this beautiful male lion... What a hunt!"

    But the photograph led to a storm of criticism online, with the presenter branded "heartless" and "shameful".
    Twitter user Gareth Pike said: "I've absolutely no words for this Melissa Bachman character.

    "If she gets enjoyment from this then there is something seriously wrong."

    Lisa Edwards added: "Shocked to read about Melissa Bachman, happily hunting beautiful animals in SA for entertainment. Shameful."

    Even comedian Ricky Gervais expressed his disgust at the image, tweeting:
    Bachman's own Twitter account now appears to have been closed down.

    In South Africa, the picture has also prompted an online petition which calls on authorities to stop her going back into the country.

    It has already gathered more than 7,000 signatures, and says: "[Bachman] is an absolute contradiction to the culture of conservation this country prides itself on. Her latest Facebook post features her with a lion she has just executed and murdered in our country.

    "As tax payers we demand she no longer be granted access to this country and its natural resources."

    Bachman's website says she films, edits and hunts for a living, and adds this is her "dream job".
    The site and her Facebook page feature dozens of photos of her with animals she has killed, including an Alaskan brown bear.

    I am American so speak the truth.
    I won't waste time telling you that these are cull animals that these folks are paying big bucks that goes towards park management in countries that aren't in the best financial shape to begin with.. yadda yadda.....
    What I will tell you is, it is a lousy ass American (or someone from any other country) that will dig up negative, half truth stuff about his own country and try and drum up criticism from another country's folks for the sake of trying to fit in the way you are doing.....
    Whatever floats your boat, but you've just wiped out any respect I may have had for you...

  7. #7
    As long as its done humanely and ethically its good. No different to people paying to shoot grouse here, its puts more money into the local economy than photography. If the animals are treated as a commodity (albeit a surplus) they have a value which will be beneficial to both the animal and local human population.

  8. #8
    I haven't really scrutinised any of the articles she has published but having watched various youtube videos of 'professional' hunters or 'outfitters' filming clients (mostly American) I would say there are quite a few that leave themselves open to harsh criticism and don't do the sport any favours.

    Example. (12 minutes into the link) An introduction to hunting for a TV journalist where after a familiarisation session on a range takes an AR15 semi auto out lamping wild pigs in Texas. Pigs are spotted travelling at a distance of over 100 meters. Tv journalist is encouraged to take pot-shots from standing unsupported position on the back of the pickup truck with vocal support from his hosts. Plenty of missed shots and one or two where they tell him he hit them. He eventually hands the rifle over saying 'I think its time to change shooters ..... the guys are putting all this pressure on me and,.. ' I think he quite rightly felt like he should not be shooting so carelessly at live animals and it made me feel quite angry that he was being encouraged to do so by 'professionals'.



    I read a list of guidelines for filming a hunt some time ago, I think it might have been for safari club international sponsored hunters. Its intention was to ensure that hunts captured on film promoted respect for the quarry being hunted. We need to support this kind thing. Not only for good PR but to also setting a example to new hunters/sportsmen.

  9. #9
    SD Regular Mr. Gain's Avatar
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    This doesn't appear to be hunting as I think most members on here would understand it, but it undoubtedly puts dollars into an economy that needs them.

    It seems to me that trophy hunting, and African trophy hunting in particular, has a significant "image problem". Many of those who want to do it seem to be insipred by a desire to relive the exploits of a century and more ago, when American and European hunters set spectacularly low standards as far as sustainability and conservation were concerned, and by presenting themselves in that mould they jeopardise the very sport they pursue.

    Today, however, hunters have no excuse not to keep both conservation and public relations issues very much in mind.

    It is vital to get the message across that commercial hunting can not only be the best means of conserving the otherwise endangered ecosystems that support game species, but also that it is generally the form of intervention that provides the best cost/benefit solution when it comes to the direct protection of rural human livelihoods.

    Unfortunately, as we all know, a picture is worth a thousand words, and it seems likely that it will take many thousand words from those who recognise the benefits hunting brings to begin to correct the adverse publicity Ms. Bachman's picture has provoked.
    "Docendo discimus" - Seneca the Younger (c. 4 BC – 65 AD)
    “Comodidad, tranquilidad y buena alimentacion” - A Spanish recipe for contentment that oddly omits hunting.
    "I'm off to spend some time at the top of the food chain..." - (after) Tulloch
    "Oh [dear], they probably heard that in the village!" - RickoShay

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Cadex View Post
    Each to their own but shooting Leo, trumpton, or any of the large African
    species isn't my cup of tea ... Saying that I appreciate that by offering them
    as sporting opportunities bring in much needed funds, which in turn goes towards
    the conservation of the species as a whole.
    Completely agree couldn't have worded it better myself

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