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Thread: action bedding

  1. #1

    action bedding

    I've been doing a bit of reading and would appreciate the thoughts of experienced people on this:

    How much difference does action bedding make to the practical accuracy of a stalking (not target) rifle over the long term? Ie. Are you really likely to notice any meaningful difference in performance over the working lifetime of a factory rifle (say in something like a .308, over 30 years of moderate recreational use)?

  2. #2
    I'd say there are different factors to consider, make/quality of rifle, stock, mounting set up, threading job, moderator, ammunition factory/handload etc etc. short term is say yes, I've seen considerable accuracy improvement with a bedded rifle over an unbedded rifle. JMO

  3. #3
    Bedding can deteriorate over time. My P-H 1200C needs the bedding looking at and sorting as the rifle tends to string the groups out horizontally. I did discuss it with a couple of rifle smiths/builders. Me being me I want it to look factory spec still so free floating is out.

    Often it's the gorilla with the turn screw who causes problems by over tightening and crushing the bedding area .

    So firstly decide on the result you which to achieve then ask the questions of those who can do the job well .

  4. #4
    While the benefits in accuracy as defined by smaller group size might be well-established, the difference may be less relevant to the average stalker. However, bedding may reduce the effects on POI of atmospheric conditions and different shooting positions. This improvement in consistency is certainly welcome and increases the confidence your confidence that the bullet will strike where you want.

  5. #5
    All of my wooden stocked rifles have been bedded and free floated, I found out that going to Scotland for the hinds at a time when we would be wet for the week, that the point of aim changed on my wooden stocked rifles halfway through the week. Once they were bedded and floated this was no longer an issue, never been an issues on my go to 270s with synthetic stocks, they are much more durable and sensible in the challenging climate up there. Easy to do and all 5 of my wooden stocks have been done to date. deerwarden

  6. #6
    Why would one want a non bedded rifle? What would the advantage be?
    Yes bedding materials could chemically break down or fatigue, however if one uses the right materials with the right process, bedding materials will last very very long. I started playing with epoxy resins as a kid in the early seventies, saw a fishing rod we fixed then recently at my fathers place and the epoxy was still good. The resins I use now for bedding are cleared for aerospace applications and we heat treat to manufacturers spec, using the same resin and hardener since end 80's. Well proven.
    edi

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by ejg View Post
    Why would one want a non bedded rifle? What would the advantage be?
    edi
    Well, that's exactly the question - or it's the mirror image of the question. What is the evidence that bedding makes a significant difference to field functionality in a stalking rifle? Not theoretical grouping in perfect conditions, but simple 3-shots-in-3-inches reliability over the long term, with an average shooter pulling the trigger, under normal stalking conditions?

  8. #8
    Ahhh actually the rifles bedding does not have to be synthetic or plastic. I own several rifles that the receiver is bedded into the wooden stock. Careful inletting so that the action fits like a glove and careful bedding of the stock to the recoil lug and shoulders means that it's stable.

    However manufacturers found out the by synthetic bedding they could use semi skilled or unskilled labour so cut costs.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Brithunter View Post
    Ahhh actually the rifles bedding does not have to be synthetic or plastic. I own several rifles that the receiver is bedded into the wooden stock. Careful inletting so that the action fits like a glove and careful bedding of the stock to the recoil lug and shoulders means that it's stable.

    However manufacturers found out the by synthetic bedding they could use semi skilled or unskilled labour so cut costs.
    why don't you mount a dti/clock gauge on the barrel of one of your wooden bedded rifles, and put the indicator tip against the stock at the front of the rifle. loosen and tighten the action screws at the front and then at the back and tell us how many thou they moved by. i'd be very interested to see what the results are.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by nowler View Post
    why don't you mount a dti/clock gauge on the barrel of one of your wooden bedded rifles, and put the indicator tip against the stock at the front of the rifle. loosen and tighten the action screws at the front and then at the back and tell us how many thou they moved by. i'd be very interested to see what the results are.

    It would be interesting but sadly I cannot accommodate your idea as they are all still in storage.

    Am currently looking up the amounts of pressure recommended for the fore tip bedding point but am not sure all my material has been returned..

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