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Thread: Lubricating inside case neck?

  1. #1

    Lubricating inside case neck?

    I'm considering trying graphite powder to lubricate the inside of my
    case neck prior to seating the bullet ..

    Is anyone using graphite for this purpose and can you comment on it's
    effectiveness etc ?

  2. #2
    Never felt the urge to lube the case neck for seating purposes, have you come across a particular problem that requires this? For sizing purposes I use spray lube and can't believe how long it lasts, I think I have only bought about four cans in twenty years!

  3. #3
    No I don't have a problem as such, i'm just one of life's ' tinkerers'.
    I was thinking by lubricating the inside of the neck with graphite would give
    a more uniform release of the bullet and ultimately a reduced velocity
    spread and potentially tighter groups ...

    Any thoughts anyone ?

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Cadex View Post
    No I don't have a problem as such, i'm just one of life's ' tinkerers'.
    I was thinking by lubricating the inside of the neck with graphite would give
    a more uniform release of the bullet and ultimately a reduced velocity
    spread and potentially tighter groups ...

    Any thoughts anyone ?
    Cadex,

    But how long do you want to hold the bullet before this uniform release? That will define what you use to stick the bullet to the case

    Stan

  5. #5
    Uniform crimping is the answer to this one.
    (The Unspeakable In Pursuit Of The Uneatable.) " If I can help, I will help!." Former S.A.C.S. member!

  6. #6
    I use graphite to neck size..just dip neck in powder & neck size. The powder can 'block' inside the neck, so after dipping, a sharp knock should see the blocked powder fall from the neck.

    +1 crimp - Lee factory crimp die for a final touch on neck/bullet tension. ATB
    Blaser K95 Luxus Kipplaufbüchse .25-06Rem. Zeiss 8x56, 110gn Nosler Accubond = Game Over!

  7. #7
    ive experimented with graphite at extended ranges and saw no reason why to keep using it , same result with moly bullets as well i got no better groups so carry on using no graphite now inside the neck now only a touch of witches tit milk
    Official Sponsor to Team GB F Class

  8. #8
    If you want to try it, it might be easier to dip the bullet in a graphite dispenser (the ones with graphite and the round balls) before placing in the case mouth and seating, rather than trying to lube the case neck directly.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by deeangeo View Post
    I use graphite to neck size..just dip neck in powder & neck size. The powder can 'block' inside the neck, so after dipping, a sharp knock should see the blocked powder fall from the neck.

    +1 crimp - Lee factory crimp die for a final touch on neck/bullet tension. ATB
    I also use graphite when neck sizing in a normal (not a bushing) neck sizing die or using a neck bushing die with a normal (not Titanium Nitride) bushing - dip the neck in the pot and tap it on the rim to clear any surplus; I dip every other case as the residue from one will sit on the surface of the die. That said, all my neck sizing is usually done with a TN bushing.

    As for dipping bullets in graphite to get a uniform bullet release, there is a lot more to it than that. At a basic level you could simply crimp but then that restricts you to using bullets with a crimping groove and also sets your seating depth which, assuming you are looking for accuracy, means you have tied one hand behind your back before you start.

    Uniform bullet release is all down to neck tension which means looking at a range of variables, in no particular order:

    1. The neck thickness, this needs to be uniform, not only around the circumference of the neck but also from one case to the next - this means measuring the thickness at a minimum of three points around the circumference and then either batching your cases into groups that are all the same give to take half a thou, or if you're going to do it properly neck turning them.

    2. Bullet diameter, you will need to know what the diameter of the bullet you are using is, bullets for, say, a 243W will not necessarily be .243".

    3. To do the job properly, take one of the cases you've batched or neck turned and run it through the normal neck sizing die then seat your bullet. Next measure the outside diameter of the bullet, typically for a 243 or 6mmBR this might be around 0.269" (0.243" bullet plus neck thickness x2 of 0.026" = 0.269").

    4. Now you know the loaded neck diameter you can experiment with neck bushing dies to see how much neck tension works best for that load - typically this is one or two thou but it will depend on the seating depth as what you are really doing is applying friction via a bearing surface (the inside of the case neck where it is in contact with the bullet). So, get yourself a neck bushing die and some bushes (based on the dimensions above for example try 0.267" and 0.268" bushes) and see what happens.

    Tinker on mate, that's what reloading is all about, the shooting becomes a secondary pleasure!! It's just what nasty wet, windy days like today are for

  10. #10
    Should also have added that when you go to all this trouble be sure you remove the expander ball from the die or all your hard work selecting the correct bushing will be wasted as the case neck will be opened up to a standard size...

    If you need to true up the case neck so it is round do it with something like a Lyman M die before you neck size.

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