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Thread: RSPCA on the telly

  1. #1

    RSPCA on the telly

    Late lunch today and flicking channels on the TV I came across an animal rescue programme.

    One section was a young Roebuck trapped in the grounds of a school. It was going by the greenery sometime in the late spring and the animal was in in velvet. The buck had spent some time trying to force its way through the perimeter fencing and had damaged the velvet on its antlers and abraded some of the coat from its shoulders.

    Along come the RSPCA, and successfully trap the roebuck in a corner and throw a blanket over it. A quick inspection, 'nasty cuts to antlers, will get infected if released and also bruising to the shoulders' 'they do not do well at animal centres' and the decision was quickly made to euthanise it. Bit surprised myself as it looked just like loose velvet knocked off and a moulting animal that had dislodged a lot of it's old coat.

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by mudman View Post
    Late lunch today and flicking channels on the TV I came across an animal rescue programme.

    One section was a young Roebuck trapped in the grounds of a school. It was going by the greenery sometime in the late spring and the animal was in in velvet. The buck had spent some time trying to force its way through the perimeter fencing and had damaged the velvet on its antlers and abraded some of the coat from its shoulders.

    Along come the RSPCA, and successfully trap the roebuck in a corner and throw a blanket over it. A quick inspection, 'nasty cuts to antlers, will get infected if released and also bruising to the shoulders' 'they do not do well at animal centres' and the decision was quickly made to euthanise it. Bit surprised myself as it looked just like loose velvet knocked off and a moulting animal that had dislodged a lot of it's old coat.
    Their motto is `Get hold of it and kill it`
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  3. #3
    To be fair to them, they are dammed if they do and dammed if they don't.

    Roe don't generally react well to being held in captivity even before any seen or unseen injuries are taken into account.

    Sounds to me like the Inspector or Animal Collection Officer on the ground made a tough decision, especially when on camera, and I think they should respected for it. I have had RTC deer that only appear stunned or very lightly injured but I have always killed them, that way I know the situation has been resolved. Harsh maybe but realistic.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by mudman View Post
    Late lunch today and flicking channels on the TV I came across an animal rescue programme.

    One section was a young Roebuck trapped in the grounds of a school. It was going by the greenery sometime in the late spring and the animal was in in velvet. The buck had spent some time trying to force its way through the perimeter fencing and had damaged the velvet on its antlers and abraded some of the coat from its shoulders.

    Along come the RSPCA, and successfully trap the roebuck in a corner and throw a blanket over it. A quick inspection, 'nasty cuts to antlers, will get infected if released and also bruising to the shoulders' 'they do not do well at animal centres' and the decision was quickly made to euthanise it. Bit surprised myself as it looked just like loose velvet knocked off and a moulting animal that had dislodged a lot of it's old coat.
    I had quite the opposite an hour ago... I had a call from a landowner with a Roe buck that hadn't moved for sometime, and one of the girls in with the horses had called the RSPCA. Stroppy RSPCA bint was already there when I arrived, having ignored the "don't need to attend" call, and upon being told that I was due shortly, proceeded to pick the animal up and get it to her van before I arrived.

    There was no observation made before approaching the animal. She made no attempt to approach from behind and/or from downwind, just threw a sheet over its body and picked it up.

    I arrived as she was leaving the field with him and immediately got his eyes covered as he was clearly "not chuffed".

    Having rocked up in her blue uniform, and demanded to know where the deer was without any intro, the girls were already less than impressed, and are going to put a call in to complain.

    All the appearances were that she wanted to save the animal, come what may. I'm more than happy with that as an outcome, but she has no idea if he had anything seriously wrong before picking him up, so was in no position to make a decision on whether he could be moved, let alone saved! "So you checked him for rectal bleeding before picking him up then? Obviously you don't want a deer with a Notifiable Disease like TB in your boot do you", didn't go down well...

    On a positive note, he was heavy and seemed pretty healthy other than what looked like just a bang on the head (having given him a very, very quick once over whilst she trumped off to get her van), so hopefully will make a full recovery if he makes it to the RSPCA centre without having heart failure.

    Sh*tty attitude
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  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by mudman View Post
    Late lunch today and flicking channels on the TV I came across an animal rescue programme.

    One section was a young Roebuck trapped in the grounds of a school. It was going by the greenery sometime in the late spring and the animal was in in velvet. The buck had spent some time trying to force its way through the perimeter fencing and had damaged the velvet on its antlers and abraded some of the coat from its shoulders.

    Along come the RSPCA, and successfully trap the roebuck in a corner and throw a blanket over it. A quick inspection, 'nasty cuts to antlers, will get infected if released and also bruising to the shoulders' 'they do not do well at animal centres' and the decision was quickly made to euthanise it. Bit surprised myself as it looked just like loose velvet knocked off and a moulting animal that had dislodged a lot of it's old coat.
    sounds des like they did the right thing for once. Roe tend to die when taken into captivity.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by aliS View Post
    sounds des like they did the right thing for once. Roe tend to die when taken into captivity.
    maybe I should have said that the school bordered open countryside. It would have been a simple case of carrying it outside of the gate and letting it go where it came from. Or cutting/ removing a panel of the fence and letting it find its own way back as it was very lively until captured, continually pacing up and down the fence.

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