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Thread: Crossing public land to access private permision..is it legal carrying a rifle?

  1. #1

    Crossing public land to access private permision..is it legal carrying a rifle?

    I have the shooting rights over a piece of private woodland that is bordered all down one side by open New Forest ground (Forestry Commission/New Forest Authority). If I can access it from this side it is much better for the wind usually and to access the only highseat in the wood with minimal disturbance.
    Can I walk across this ground (about 200yds from a field entrance I can park) with my gun sleaved ,unloaded etc. To access my wood? There have been many times when game shooting when we've all piled out of the wagon with shotguns (in sleaves) on the side of the road and wondered down the lane to access the field for the next drive, is there any difference?
    Any help much appreciated.

    George

  2. #2
    You can cross the public access land to get to your shooting permission. As you say, gun sleeved and empty.

  3. #3
    Thanks rake aboot ,are you sure that this counts in England as well as Scotland with its established open access situation?

  4. #4
    George. You would be wise to obtain permission. Otherwise entering land in possession of a firearm could result in the offence of 'trespassing with a firearm' being committed.

  5. #5
    Get permission and save getting any hassle

    Al

  6. #6
    1. My understanding is that you can walk over land on which you do not have permission to shoot PROVIDING your rifle is empty and sleeved, and PROVIDING you use a public footpath or public highway.
    2. You can shoot from a footpath which is on land on which you do not have permission to shoot PROVIDING that footpath is adjacent to the land boundary on which you do have permission to shoot, and PROVIDING you shoot directly into your own land.
    3. If you have to cross land on which you do not have permission to shoot and can't use a public footpath you will need the permission of the landowner.

    Rather than get a confrontation it is always wise to let neighbouring landowners / stalkers know who you are and what you do, even if you know that you are within your legal rights. A chat, introduction, handshake, exchange of contact details and a smile usually gets you what you want or need. This is also an opportunity to get permission to enter the neighbouring land to search for a runner or retrieve a carcass. Most landowners are perfectly reasonable and cooperative.
    • Do not be seduced by the marketing-men....

  7. #7
    Correct me if I`m wrong, but walking with a firearm in its case in a public place is legal.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Rake Aboot View Post
    Correct me if I`m wrong, but walking with a firearm in its case in a public place is legal.
    That's my understanding as above .but I would always try and gain permission first if possible to save any trouble later .also it could open new doors you never know .
    DJC

  9. #9
    This has been done to death. It is legal to cross a public road/footpath/common land etc. with a firearm. The BASC has confirmed this. It is a public right of way...period, end of.

    Do a search on this site, ring the BASC firearms dept, it is legal. You do not need permission, you are not trespassing on private land.

    ATB

  10. #10
    Please take a look here: http://basc.org.uk/firearms/guidance-and-fact-sheets/ towards the bottom of the list are a couple of fact sheets about access in England / Wales and Scotland.

    I hope this helps.

    David

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