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Thread: Mono stick.

  1. #1

    Mono stick.

    Just wondering what people think to single sticks. I currently stalk thick woodland. In order to try and get into more deer I stalk through some less dense area's. Problem is although I practise with normal 2 leg sticks I would like to make things even slicker. I have got into deer recently only to see them bounce off before getting sticks set. So as shots are likely to be upto 50 yds max have users of single sticks found and significant loss of accuracy when using single stick as opposed to double legged ones. Experience would be appreciated.

  2. #2
    I use a single stick when it wet for bunnies with the .22lr, never had a problem, and significantly better than no stick.
    That said, any time it is dry enough to risk kneeling I use my short double sticks.

    Neil.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by woodmaster View Post
    Just wondering what people think to single sticks. I currently stalk thick woodland. In order to try and get into more deer I stalk through some less dense area's. Problem is although I practise with normal 2 leg sticks I would like to make things even slicker. I have got into deer recently only to see them bounce off before getting sticks set. So as shots are likely to be upto 50 yds max have users of single sticks found and significant loss of accuracy when using single stick as opposed to double legged ones. Experience would be appreciated.
    I have never fired a round off of sticks. Do you really need them for a 50 yard shot? Can't you lean against a tree or something?~Muir

  4. #4
    I see your thinking Muir, but problem is pretty well all the trees are larch or spruce and have many branches at low level so can not be got close enough to to use as a rest. I could probably shoot off hand and have taken a couple in this way, however often only a limited window is available and a head or neck is all that's on view. This is when a rest is needed for me at least. I guess I just have to give it a go with a hazel stick.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by woodmaster View Post
    I see your thinking Muir, but problem is pretty well all the trees are larch or spruce and have many branches at low level so can not be got close enough to to use as a rest. I could probably shoot off hand and have taken a couple in this way, however often only a limited window is available and a head or neck is all that's on view. This is when a rest is needed for me at least. I guess I just have to give it a go with a hazel stick.
    I see. That would be a tough shot.~Muir

  6. #6
    when I 1st started rifle shooting with my old mans .22 all I used was a single hazel stick it wasn't that stable but you could get by with it ok and you should be ok with it for what you want if I were you I would still take your two sticks for longer shots but if you think you have limited time for a shot keep them closed and just use them as a single stick then you have the best of both worlds

  7. #7
    I used a single hazel stick for several years. You will find that it is fine for the closer ranges in woodland. It was also easier to deploy than the doubles. The doubles that I have used for the past five or six years are the modified garden cane type. Sometimes for close range quick shots I simply deploy them closed as I would a single stick.

  8. #8
    I have used a single stick for years, never had a problem. The one I use has a vee on top to rest the forend in. I would advise to just find what your limatations are when shooting with one stick.

    ATB

    Tahr

  9. #9
    At last a subject I may contribute with knowledge if not ideal competence!

    I carry a single 8ft holly stick with a lanyard hole some 4" from the top. From this I support a series of conveniently spaced chunky knots tied in 4mm leather strap that extend just over half way down the stick. They act as 'stoppers' when gripping the stick between 2 fingers and supporting rifle with remaining and thumb.

    I also carry on elasticated cord a pair of very lightweight and short Snyper Stix for sitting and kneeling shots. They are easily and silently deployed by slipping from left shoulder if needed.

    As mentioned before I consider the single stick/pole to be an invaluable aid to safety when negotiating precipitous ground and where you may otherwise end up sliding forward or landing on your a-se.

    Clearly you need to practice using one!

    Cheers

    K

  10. #10
    Personally I would be inclined to practice with a rimfire with the twin sticks and try and get a bit quicker with them. I stalk in pretty dense cover and have not found twin sticks too slow yet.

    Try stalking the real dense cover in a bit of wind and rain, this can cover your noise and make getting in close a bit easier

    If though that is no good for you, why not try as has already been suggested and use your twin sticks as a single stick, try that on targets and see how you fare, that would give you the best of both worlds, failing that, try a single hazel stick on targets too and see how it compares.

    if you do cut a single stick make sure it is long enough so that you can stand up straight when using it. Mine was about 6 inches longer than I am tall.
    Last edited by jubnut; 05-01-2014 at 09:20.

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