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Thread: curing venison

  1. #1

    curing venison

    right been meaning to get round to this for ages so here goes,
    1 haunch venison
    5g cure 2 prague powder
    55g salt
    2.2g garlic powder
    4.2g rosemary
    6.6g black pepper
    1.6g juniper berries
    I started with a haunch and cut the leg bone down and i also cut most of the siver skin off then weigh out all ingredients and rub into all nooks and crannies till totally covered place haunch in a bag and tip the rest of the ingedients into the bag and shake well.
    Tye the top and leave in the fridge for 18 days then into the curing chamber for 2 months, atb wayne



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  2. #2
    I have not done this yet but have a haunch in the freezer to do, but that doesn't sound like a lot of salt compared to what I have read is that because of the prague powder? And is that 5g a specific amount because it can be dangerous? Be great to see how this goes!

  3. #3
    hi bud yes its a specific amount from here
    Cured Meats: Violino di Capra - Goat Prosciutto
    all ingredients were set as a percentage of weight,I chose this one as i wanted the flavour of the meats to come through ,atb wayne

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  4. #4
    Cheers will take a look, a lot of the reports on here say it ends up too salty so be good to see how yours turns out with less salt. What does your chamber look like?

  5. #5
    its a fridge with a tube heater and hooked up to a temp controller to keep a constant 55 deg i need to rig up a computer fan and at the moment for humidity its got a container of saturated salt solution but will get a humidifier at some point,atb wayne
    Last edited by mereside; 06-01-2014 at 19:56.

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  6. #6
    here is an artical on different methods of cure using salt so it might help when curing for those wanting to try,
    I've gotten a number of questions regarding the application of salt during the curing phase of cured meats as it related to quantity and duration, so I thought a small post was in order to clarify various curing methodologies.

    There are generally 2 methods to cure meat:


    1. The older method (I believe) is what I would call "excess salt" curing. This basically involves applying a generous quantity of salt to the piece of meat, together with the spices, and waiting a certain amount of time for the meat to absorb the salt.
    2. The other method is what I (and others) call "equilibrium curing" in which a calculated quantity of salt is added to the meat, with the spices, and allowing enough time for the meat to absorb all the salt.

    While both methods will work, the excess salt method involves guessing, hopefully based on experience, how long the meat should be left in this salt mixture to cure. If it's not left long enough, not enough salt is absorbed to preserve the meat, if it's left too long the end product will be salty. This "guessing" will have to vary based on the percentage of meat to fat in the product (fat absorbs salt less readily), whether the product has skin on it (skin acts as a barrier), the thickness of the product, the temperature of the fridge, and probably many more variables. I've heard people say to leave items for 1 days per kilogram of meat, but that doesn't really make sense as it doesn't account for thickness or fat content. Sounds to me like the old recipes where people were told to cook something in the oven for X number of minutes per pound. It'll work, but most likely you'll end up with overcooked/undercooked food because the variables are not accounted for! Honestly, this type of curing doesn't make much sense to me. I don't see an advantage, but I would be happy to hear from people who do this (and there are many!) to correct me.


    I always cure using an equilibrium cure. I use between 2.5% and 3.5% of the meats weight in salt, rub it all over the meat, and put the meat in a sealed bag, flipping it every 3-5 days in the refrigerator to make sure the chunk is always exposed to the brine that is formed by the salt pulling out water from the muscle. After a fairly arbitrary amount of time, but one which is long enough to make sure all the salt i've applied has been absorbed, I consider the meat cured and ready to move to the next phase, into the fermentation box or curing chamber. To me this is much easier than excess salt curing. By applying a known, wanted, quantity of salt, the product will not become over-salted, ever, no matter how long it's left in the fridge. The question is really what the minimum amount of time is for the meat to absorb the salt. I don't really have a good answer, other than "leave it long enough to be SURE it's absorbed the salt". I always leave my items in the fridge curing at least 2 weeks, and for very large things like a culatello, I give it 3. That's the beauty of this system..... you can't overcure! I guess if I'm in a analogy to cooking mood, this method would be the sous vide cooking of the curing world. By cooking a product at it's final temperature, you can't overcook it, and it won't be undercooked if you leave it long enough.


    I hope that sheds some light on the different methods, and why I do things the way I do.

    that was taken from the cured meats website, atb wayne

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  7. #7

  8. #8
    thanks for that another one to try, atb wayne

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  9. #9
    Hey new to this, And was wondering if anyone did a wet cure with venison and how it turned out. I am familiar with bacon but hesitant with venison not wanting to waste it, Really enjoy my bacon and hams cured with salt,garlic, and black pepper simple and tasty.
    Dixie

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Dixie View Post
    Hey new to this, And was wondering if anyone did a wet cure with venison and how it turned out. I am familiar with bacon but hesitant with venison not wanting to waste it, Really enjoy my bacon and hams cured with salt,garlic, and black pepper simple and tasty.
    Dixie
    Hi, I've got some on the go right now. Mix an 80% brine solution (2.5 l of water to 1.2kg of normal salt) and pierce the meat well. I then cure it in the brine for 30 mins per 25mm of thicknes. Take it out of the brine and hang it in the chiller to dry out for 3 hrs or overnight. I then pop it into the hot smoker at 50 deg c for 40 mins and then add sawdust and increase the temp to 70deg c and smoke it for several hours until its internal temp reaches 65 deg c. I then take it out and rinse it in cold water to cool it down and pop it back in the chiller for 12 hrs to let the tase mellow. After that its done. Its lovely, its like a venison ham and is very good to eat. Try making a VLT sandwich with gerhkin in some home made mayonaise.

    Kind regards, Olaf

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