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Thread: UK Bio-security

  1. #1
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    UK Bio-security

    I used the channel tunnel a couple of weeks ago and due to a disruption in the service I found that my scheduled departure time was delayed, from Coquelles (the French end). Anyways, rather than join the very slow moving queue for spaces in the jam packed terminal/retail centre car park I drew off into a handy and not too busy little car park to the right of the entry ways. This actually turned out to be the inspection-point car park for dog owners heading for the UK. I sat there for about an hour variously reading and texting friends and was astonished at the throughput of dog owners... often with multiple numbers of dogs too. I'd guess something around a hundred cars, with dogs, went through the place while I was sitting there. At one point, I got talking with the owner of a nice looking pair of Vizlas... It turned out that he wasn't a shooting man (though he certainly dressed the part) but he had very much enjoyed walking his dogs in a number of places in Eastern France where he had seen a variety of species of deer and also some wild boar. Me too.... but I didn't tell him I'd been shooting them, he had already said he couldn't really see why anyone would want to do that.

    It then occurred to me to wonder... where did he take his dogs in the UK... So, I asked... "Oh! I live in Ross-on-Wye and it's only a short drive to the forest of Dean, we love to take the dogs for a walk there and to picnic in the woods" ...

    At that point I probably had a glazed look wash over my face, as I contemplated just how many different types of problem might be spread this way. Yikes!

  2. #2
    I am suprised we don't take more care care at airports and ferry terminals for bio hazards like in NZ or australia as all gear is checked properly, when we went over to NZ one of the guys had mucky stalking gear and it was confiscated and boots had to be disinfected with strong chemicals and bagged up he was lucky he got some of the gear back.

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  3. #3
    Oh my Tamus, welcome to my personal world of pain! You are witnessing part of one of the central tents of EU policy - free movement. At times, it seems free movement trumps all other considerations, it certainly overrides the more logical concerns about movement of diseases. The movement of people and animals, especially pets is a major risk for introducing new diseases into any country and currently forms part of my studies into Conservation Medicine.
    For UK pets Leishmaniasis, Babesiosis, Heartworm, Ehrlichosis and tapeworm (E. multilocularis) are but a few of the nasties that can be brought back. Our ticks are the same as EU ticks so infection will become established here. There used to be a requirement for treatment, but no longer (except tape worm). I personally wouldn't take my dog abroad. www.bva-awf.org.uk/sites/bva-awf.org.uk/files/user/taking_your_pets_abroad.pdf is a good guide for anyone contemplating it.

    The comparison with NZ is appropriate, except the numbers of entrants is huge for the UK and disinfection impractical.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Buchan View Post
    Oh my Tamus, welcome to my personal world of pain! You are witnessing part of one of the central tents of EU policy - free movement. At times, it seems free movement trumps all other considerations, it certainly overrides the more logical concerns about movement of diseases. The movement of people and animals, especially pets is a major risk for introducing new diseases into any country and currently forms part of my studies into Conservation Medicine.
    For UK pets Leishmaniasis, Babesiosis, Heartworm, Ehrlichosis and tapeworm (E. multilocularis) are but a few of the nasties that can be brought back. Our ticks are the same as EU ticks so infection will become established here. There used to be a requirement for treatment, but no longer (except tape worm). I personally wouldn't take my dog abroad. www.bva-awf.org.uk/sites/bva-awf.org.uk/files/user/taking_your_pets_abroad.pdf is a good guide for anyone contemplating it.

    The comparison with NZ is appropriate, except the numbers of entrants is huge for the UK and disinfection impractical.
    Hi Buchan..

    Yes quite a worrying practice... taking pooches to and from the continent... particularly if they are fully exposed to foreign "natural environments".

    You'll be glad to know my own hunting kit was well scrubbed with an iodoform disinfectant before packing, then kept discrete from the rest of my luggage and washed again, thoroughly, on return home... my boots still smell a bit "hospitally"...

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Buchan View Post

    The comparison with NZ is appropriate, except the numbers of entrants is huge for the UK and disinfection impractical.
    But just as necessary, pathogens do not discriminate between volumes handled and EU membership, UK Bio-security measures are an absolute shambles!

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