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Thread: Trail Cameras

  1. #1

    Trail Cameras

    Did buying and setting up a trail cam on your ground increase your success?

  2. #2
    Only your knowledge of what's on the ground at the time, the rest is up to you however that knowledge doe's inspire confidence and they tell you if used over a period, the most likely times the deer may be encountered, so you can intercept or try to accordingly I really love using trail cams they are a form of hunting in their own way and can tell a lot about deer behavior and movement, mind you a lot of that movement where I am and sika are involved is at night but its still nice to know when they are around and will help you in choice of location but they will never guarantee success.


  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by dlz90 View Post
    Only your knowledge of what's on the ground at the time, the rest is up to you however that knowledge doe's inspire confidence and they tell you if used over a period, the most likely times the deer may be encountered, so you can intercept or try to accordingly I really love using trail cams they are a form of hunting in their own way and can tell a lot about deer behavior and movement, mind you a lot of that movement where I am and sika are involved is at night but its still nice to know when they are around and will help you in choice of location but they will never guarantee success.
    Thanks for the reply. We have a fairly new bit of ground and are unable to get up much more than every three weeks or so. I think 2 or 3 cameras would really help us assess numbers and movement times. Got to be worth a go I think.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Hunting Solutions View Post
    Thanks for the reply. We have a fairly new bit of ground and are unable to get up much more than every three weeks or so. I think 2 or 3 cameras would really help us assess numbers and movement times. Got to be worth a go I think.

    Yes definitely worth a go alright and the beautiful thing I think about the use of the cameras is the fact that they can record and capture 24/7 over long periods of time and give you information you would not otherwise have, so in essence they can help your success rate and are a lot of fun to use I love retrieving the sd cards you just never know what will turn up good luck with the new ground and have fun with the cameras.


    Damain


  5. #5
    Thanks Damain, appreciated.
    Last edited by Hunting Solutions; 25-01-2014 at 23:06. Reason: spelling

  6. #6
    I wouldn't say I shoot more deer since I've been using the cameras but I do now have a better picture of the amount of deer and quality of the bucks. Also I see the odd fox or a lost dog walker.

  7. #7
    Yes to a Degree.

    I set up trail cams in various places that I know deer frequent. The use of a trail cam gives me a better idea of the numbers in the area, also by setting up on wallows etc, you can find the number of Stags that
    are local to that area. Which obviously bodes well for the Roar.

  8. #8
    I don't think it increased success but it added another form of entertainment to the whole process in that it is fun to select a spot and then to come back and see what has been moving in the area over a few weeks.

    The camera can also provide some useful information about general movement patterns and the one thing it taught me on my ground is that even in areas with a huge number of tracks etc. there is little or no point sitting in a high seat as sometimes the camera would only capture a few deer in a month, especially during winter.

    However, the deer seem to move about more than the books predct and so my experience is that it takes a while to build up a pattern - for example I had an area where the camera might capture over 100 pictures per day but it turned out that this movement only happened for short periods and so there is no point going there in the winter. It took about a year to work this out.

    The quality of the camera is also important - I have a Bushnell as they get a good name for sensing and newer models have a fast trigger but Reconyx are said to be even better but are too expensive to leave tied to a tree in my view. However, even with the Bushnell if I put it into time lapse mode taking a photo every minute I'm often amazed at the deer that the motion sensor missed and which appear to be standing directly in front of the camera. Given this, and the good reputation Bushnell have for sensing and detection, I would suggest that there is no point buying a camera considered less good as you will gain little information if you are spending your tmie wondering what you missed.


    The Americans take this really seriously so go over to the chasing game forum and gather up info before you make any decisions:

    http://www.chasingame.com/forum/index.php
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  9. #9
    SD Regular Mr. Gain's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by caorach View Post
    Given [...] the good reputation Bushnell have for sensing and detection.
    I hope their cameras have got better. Their original offerings were quite good in their day, but the next couple of models I had were seriously faulty, as were the various replacements sent out, so I stopped using them.

    If yours fails to detect large animals standing right in front of it, may I respectfully suggest that it's not working that well either.

    Regardless, it is quite an interesting exercise to set up two or more cameras with overlapping arcs and compare the results. Done with cameras of the same make it can give you an idea of their real detection range and arcs. Alternatively, set up cameras of different makes alongside each other and compare the results - these can be quite surprising too.

    As for the OP's question, I agree with all the answers given so far - cameras don't really improve your success rate, but they do give you a better idea of what's on the ground and help you build a hit-list.

    They also show that movement patterns are surprisingly irregular, so Caorach's analysis of a year round pattern is a seriously impressive achievement of perseverance and record keeping.

    I find they are most use when controlling foxes, whose patrol routes are in general much more regular. But regardless of practical results, the anticipation, excitement, and satisfaction or disappointment associated with checking the cards really does add another dimension to any outing.
    Last edited by Mr. Gain; 26-01-2014 at 08:29.
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  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Gain View Post
    If yours fails to detect large animals standing right in front of it, may I respectfully suggest that it's not working that well either.
    I think they all do that, it is just that if you aren't doing the timelapse thing, or using several cameras pointed at the same area, you never know about it. Also it might have been down to my aiming - it looked OK but on reflection maybe it wasn't as good as it could have been. The detection on it is better than I expected, usually, but nothing is perfect. It has been up a tree for 18 months now and was starting to show signs of some condensation on the inside of the lens so it may be that this was also happening on the PIR. Either way I brought it home and let it sit about drying out for a few days and testing revealed that all was working as it should. However, it is out in timelapse mode again and it will be interesting to see how the detection goes. In view of the fact that it is cheap electronics in a cheap plastic box I really am amazed to have got 18 months constant use out of it - the real life of trail cameras seems to be between 1 and 2 years in general.

    One another aspect of operation that might be of interest is that I have been using lithium batteries and find they are well worth the extra money. The batteries had been in it since 21st March last year and it had been out 24/7 since so I figured, without any evidence, that they were probably on the way out. Given this I stuck it in timelapse just out of interest. When I checked it again it had taken 11,573 photos over the timelapse period and was still showing a full battery symbol! That I could see there was no reduction in performance or flash range over this time. This seems pretty impressive to me.
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