Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 20

Thread: Fallow Reaction

  1. #1

    Fallow Reaction

    Over the weekend I was stalking with a friend. We were on high seats at other ends of a large farm. Unfortunately my friend found his high seat to be in a poor state and so he decided to stalk his block of woodland on foot. He hadn't walked far when he came across a young Fallow Buck walking down the path towards. He quickly raised his rifle and pulled the trigger. Although he didn't see the strike due to the flash he expected to see the buck drop to the ground. To his surprise the follow turned slowly and started to walk slowly away hunched over. He assumed it was a gut or liver shot although unsure of how that could have happened as he had been head onto the fallow. He followed the buck expecting him to fall over any minute but instead the buck continued to walk slowly along the path. He made the decision to take a second shot before the fallow could reach difficult cover ahead. He clear saw the strike hit the back leg but the fallow continued into the cover. Not wanting to enter the cover and push the fallow further in he gave me a call to help him as it was getting dark.

    We located the buck where he had last been seen but unfortunately the buck was still alive so we dispatched him quickly. On our approach we were unable to find the strike made by the first shot taken front on. The shot in the leg was clearly visible. The Buck's coat was very wet so we assumed the strike hole was in the front was hard to find due to the matted coat (not matted with blood). We carried out the galloch but were unable to find any entry hole or any damage to the organs. I expected to see damage to the liver but it was in good condition and the guts were intact.

    We have both been left stumped by the react of the buck and I'm wondering what you guys think.

    Could the buck have be come disorientated by the bang and flash as the shot was head on at under 20m? But I can't understand why he would then hunch over.

  2. #2
    SD Regular
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Location
    Herefordshire, Hampshire or Essex
    Posts
    2,743
    I'd be looking very carefully at the overall condition of that animal internally and externally. It is abnormal behaviour and therefore something to be very wary of before putting any of the carcase in the food chain.

    Without inspection, it is hard to say, but you should assume that if you cannot find any entry wound or damage, the first shot missed. This is, to me, a sick animal and definitely one to be culled, but my instincts say destroy the carcase.
    Nooooooooooooobody expects the Spanish Inquisition!! Our main weapon is.........

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Eric the Red View Post
    This is, to me, a sick animal and definitely one to be culled, but my instincts say destroy the carcase.
    I was also concerned that the animal could have been sick due to its reaction but on inspection it appeared to be in good condition. Although the coat was matted this was due to the rain and mud on the ground where he was laid up. The reach of his coat along its body was very clean.

  4. #4
    Just a thought, but has the zero of the rifle used been checked since the incident? A clean miss at 20m is a bit of a concern. Also was the follow up shot aimed at the rear leg? This might not have been my favoured poa to finish the beast.

  5. #5
    Firstly, your friend should be chastised for taking a frontal chest shot if the carcass was intended for human consumption, this should not be taken unless absolutely necessary (I.e A second shot on a wounded animal). It is highly unlikely you would not rupture the stomach and gut with this shot.

    Also more info is needed regarding calibre as to the where abouts of the first shot.
    Last edited by Discopete; 27-01-2014 at 13:55.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Discopete View Post
    Firstly, your friend should be chastised for taking a frontal shot if the carcass was intended for human consumption, this should not be taken unless absolutely necessary (I.e A second shot on a wounded animal). It is highly unlikely you would not rupture the stomach and gut with this shot.

    Also more info is needed regarding calibre as to the where abouts of the first shot.
    Might have been aiming for a high neck shot or head shot, which would not have contaminated the carcass of carried out correctly.

  7. #7
    Did you inspect the contents of the gut? They will often gorge on wheat from pheasant feeders this time of year that expands in the gut and can if in excess can kill them, but I have even seen them laid up and unable to move, tied up in pain. Some may recover and some not. Sheep will do the same if over fed with wheat.

    I alway inspect the contents of the stomach every gralloch as it tells me where I'll find them.

    Paul

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by 1st Pattern Paul View Post
    I alway inspect the contents of the stomach every gralloch as it tells me where I'll find them.

    Paul
    When I started fly fishing, I read about anglers using a sort of spoon to find out what trout had been feeding on. At the time, I remember thinking that if I had already caught a trout, I would probably already have found out what they were feeding on!

  9. #9
    fallow walks down the path towards him, after shot, turns and walks away hunched over...ok, might have been ill, but what are the chances of it moving about down a patch actively in the first place if it's so ill that it walks slowly away hunched over after being shot at...no way.

    sub 20m, I bet you that bullet failed to expand, and you will actually (if you skin it), find an entry hole, pencil thin or less, as the skin can contract. a pencil-holing shot does not always show the internal organs destroyed upon gralloch...and you say it was dispatched, how/where? if you shot it in the chest to dispatch it, how do you know the first shot did not pencil hole into the stomach area? did you dissect the rumen? a pencil hole into the rumen, again, can contract slightly and may not leak green.

    a snapshot (assume offhand) in the front of chest, followed by one in the back leg is appalling stalking practice. Your friend should really think about this before his next deer lands in his sights.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by 1st Pattern Paul View Post
    Did you inspect the contents of the gut? They will often gorge on wheat from pheasant feeders this time of year that expands in the gut and can if in excess can kill them, but I have even seen them laid up and unable to move, tied up in pain. Some may recover and some not. Sheep will do the same if over fed with wheat.
    I didn't inspect the contents of the guts which perhaps in hindsight I should have. The rack that the buck was waling leads directly to a number of pheasant feeders and there was plenty of activity around the feeders.

    It was a 308 using Federal 150. I have used rounds from the same box without any problems.

Similar Threads

  1. Reaction of Deer to Major Disturbance
    By David Brown in forum Deer Stalking General
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 04-09-2011, 13:08
  2. Allergic reaction to deer blood?
    By Adamant in forum Deer Stalking General
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 24-03-2011, 20:26
  3. Early reaction to the call
    By WAYNE DAVIES in forum Deer Stalking General
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: 12-07-2010, 22:33
  4. Low lung shot reaction
    By mickthebrick in forum Deer Stalking General
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 22-02-2010, 19:58
  5. BDS lack of reaction
    By Butch in forum Deer Stalking General
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 07-08-2007, 20:42

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •