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Thread: Alcohol

  1. #1

    Alcohol

    hi guys, I was recently invited to go beating at a pleasant shoot, enjoyable day had by all. However I was surprised by the amount of alcohol consumed by the guns during the day. Now I may be a little silly and make fun of me by alk means of this is tradition, but is this really safe and what is the law when it comes to shooting under the influence, thoughts?

  2. #2
    Happens all the time and I`ve seen some very red faces by the end of the day. Never caused an issue though, and I`ve seen a few teams being very self policing and deciding to tone it down a bit.

    Like I say, never seen it being a problem, so why not.? If I thought someone was too drunk to have a gun in there hands I would speak up.

  3. #3
    pass the port --- to the left (always)

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Huw View Post
    hi guys, I was recently invited to go beating at a pleasant shoot, enjoyable day had by all. However I was surprised by the amount of alcohol consumed by the guns during the day. Now I may be a little silly and make fun of me by alk means of this is tradition, but is this really safe and what is the law when it comes to shooting under the influence, thoughts?
    Unlawful to supply/ repair a firearm for someone when drunk, Chiefs of Police may revoke certificates of those of "intemperate habits".

    I have never noticed any of my fellow guns over indulging in alcohol on any shoot that I have been on, it must be extremely unsettling for the other guns if someone is getting drunk and obviously this can be very dangerous. I can't imagine that anyone would go stalking after a few drinks, or do they?

    atb Tim

  5. #5
    I don't know what actual laws may be broken (drunk in charge of a firearm?) but I guess there may be a few. Also just think of the liability involved if anything should go wrong. Both shooter and shoot organisers would certainly be in deep cackie and I very much doubt that any insurance policy would be valid.

    I am told that in France that there are clear laws and that it is illegal to drink before a shoot, though I must admit that some of the "milk" being drunk on one shoot breakfast that I attended didn't look and smell like any milk I have seen before.
    It's the calibre of the shooter that counts not the calibre of the rifle.

  6. #6
    I've always wondered about this. Many a time i've been going out on a long sit in with the rifle, and considered taking a 6 pack, or a dose of single malt.

    Get stopped by the 50 in public with a firearm having been drinking.......

    I can just see the headline.....

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by 8x57 View Post
    I don't know what actual laws may be broken (drunk in charge of a firearm?) but I guess there may be a few. Also just think of the liability involved if anything should go wrong. Both shooter and shoot organisers would certainly be in deep cackie and I very much doubt that any insurance policy would be valid.

    I am told that in France that there are clear laws and that it is illegal to drink before a shoot, though I must admit that some of the "milk" being drunk on one shoot breakfast that I attended didn't look and smell like any milk I have seen before.
    Please define.... "before a shoot"

    I wouldn't have thought a breakfast "stiffener" (an hour before arriving at the pegs) would qualify, but what do you think?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Huw View Post
    hi guys, I was recently invited to go beating at a pleasant shoot, enjoyable day had by all. However I was surprised by the amount of alcohol consumed by the guns during the day. Now I may be a little silly and make fun of me by alk means of this is tradition, but is this really safe and what is the law when it comes to shooting under the influence, thoughts?

    How much are we talking about here?

    and

    What exactly were they drinking?

  9. #9
    So far as I am aware there is no law specifically against drinking and using firearms. Should something bad happen as a result of an individual drinking then I should imagine that an offence relating to criminal negligence could be followed up (e.g. manslaughter or reckless injury). You would also be wide open to be sued in the civil court for damages due to negligence as well as obviously having your certificate revoked.

    There's such a broad spectrum... having a few nips of sloe gin throughout the day (as is often traditional) is totally different to drinking to the extent where one becomes physically and mentally impaired, and therefore potentially dangerous.

    It's like all these things, it would be a shame if the responsible majority had to suffer due to the actions of the reckless few in the form of a blanket ban (however it would be enforced ?!).

    IMO it's up to all of us to say something to the keeper or shoot captain or whoever as appropriate if we see a gun doing anything dangerous, be it shooting low, unsafe gun handling or being dangerously intoxicated!

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Tamus View Post
    Please define.... "before a shoot"

    I wouldn't have thought a breakfast "stiffener" (an hour before arriving at the pegs) would qualify, but what do you think?
    The President of the hunting association that I shot with told me that it was strictly against the law to drink before shooting. Now I don't know if this was strictly correct but I had no reason to doubt him. I do know that at the end of the day the wine flowed pretty freely and that most of the guys had arranged late night transport home from the association dining hall in the middle of a forest.

    As you probably know Tamus contrary to popular belief well in Britain at least, the French are quite strict on the way that they conduct driven shooting, and once again the President explained that this was as a result of several fatal accidents in the past which had resulted in the organisers being held accountable heavily fined and even on at least one occasion being imprisoned. There was no way for instance that anyone was allowed to shoot unless they could produce their hunting licence with insurance at the start of the day. Details of these licences were noted down by the association secretary and if you forgot your licence you would be sent home as spot checks by the authorities are not unheard of. How many shoots in this country carry out such checks at the start of the day. Safety briefings were also very clear and precise using large scale wall mounted maps and diagrams to indicate safe practise, again something you can't say for all shoots in this country.
    It's the calibre of the shooter that counts not the calibre of the rifle.

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