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Thread: Salami

  1. #1

    Salami

    Wanting to have a go at venison salami,anyone got any recipe ideas ?

  2. #2
    Google "design a sausage"
    bought some chorizo mix from them

  3. #3
    We always struggled to make Venison salami.There are so many criteria that you need to meet, it was hit or miss.
    Salt content(nitrite/nitrate) is critical,(too much, in-edible-too little, toxic),as is stuffing, any air in it and it will turn rancid.
    Doesn't sound a big deal "air" but once the meat starts to dry out you get voids in the salami which turn sour, you really do have to stuff the casing to bursting point and tie off soundly,even with a hydraulic stuffer this was not always possible.
    Drying/Curing was a problem to fast, and the meat on the outside cures leaving the inside toxic.Too slow and the meat goes off before its cured..

    Word of advice! Put the toilet roll in the fridge before you try this,as that will be the only thing that will comfort you while you are on the Loo.

    Seriously, get this wrong and "Clostridium-Botulinens" is a killer.


    PS we did this commercially and the risks were too great..
    Last edited by news of the world; 23-02-2014 at 13:03.

  4. #4
    tia,

    it's fairly straightforward to make salami, you don't need to much kit to get started with. Firt things first, you need to do a little bit of research with a thermometer to find somewhere - cupboard/shed/garage/etc that has a fairly constant temp of 10-18 degrees C. You need some accurate digital scales (reloader?) and you need to buy something called Cure#2, also known as prague powder#2. In a nutshell, the cure#2 will make the salami meat in inhospitable environment for nasties whilst the salami dries.

    For cases to stuff the meat into, don't go for anything huge for your first attempt, the bigger diameter the casing, the longer it takes to dry and the more time there is for things to go wrong and you don't want that on your initial forays into salami making - ox runners are a perfect diameter for a first attempt.

    Recipe wise, it's often best to keep it simple for the firts few batches, hat way you can get to taste what the venison tastes like when cured and dried and then you can tweak the seasonings to suit your own palate. My own preference for venison salami is, salt, pepper, red wine, garlic and fennel seeds. Most flavourings are down to personal taste, however, the ingredients that you should be rigid on are the salt and the cure#2. The cure#2 MUST be used at a ratio of 2.5g per 1000g of meat (hence the accurate scales) - this is very important to ensure a safe product to eat!! and the salt should be used at a ratio of 20g-30g per 1000g of meat - not quite as important to be as rigid as with the cure#2 but it helps keep the meat safe from nasties whilst still palatable to eat.

    As venison is very lean, I always mix it with some fatty belly pork, usually at approximately 70% venison to 30% pork, all meat coarsley minced.

    There are loads of methods of making salami, and as you look into the techiniques/methods etc you'll find all sorts of ways of keeping the meat safer/putting mold on the outside etc, but, for an average bloke with a few kitchen tools, a shed and an understanding wife, this method should see you right.

    700g venison
    300g fatty belly pork
    2.5g cure#2 (for safety reasons keep this ingredient at this ratio for 1kg of meat)
    20g sea salt
    2tbs red wine
    1tsp crushed fennel seeds
    1tsp ground black pepper
    1 clove crushed garlic

    mince the meat,
    mix all the ingredients thoroughly and leave in a non metalliic bowl in the fridge overnight
    stuff into ox runners and tie each end up into sausages
    weigh each sausage
    hang at 10-18 degrees until each sausage has lost 25%-30% of their original weight - then hey are done!!

    There is more to learn and discover, but as with most things, that can come with time and experience - the above should get you some half decent results for a first attempt.

    Good luck and I hope this helps!

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Legolas View Post
    tia,

    it's fairly straightforward to make salami, you don't need to much kit to get started with. Firt things first, you need to do a little bit of research with a thermometer to find somewhere - cupboard/shed/garage/etc that has a fairly constant temp of 10-18 degrees C. You need some accurate digital scales (reloader?) and you need to buy something called Cure#2, also known as prague powder#2. In a nutshell, the cure#2 will make the salami meat in inhospitable environment for nasties whilst the salami dries.

    For cases to stuff the meat into, don't go for anything huge for your first attempt, the bigger diameter the casing, the longer it takes to dry and the more time there is for things to go wrong and you don't want that on your initial forays into salami making - ox runners are a perfect diameter for a first attempt.

    Recipe wise, it's often best to keep it simple for the firts few batches, hat way you can get to taste what the venison tastes like when cured and dried and then you can tweak the seasonings to suit your own palate. My own preference for venison salami is, salt, pepper, red wine, garlic and fennel seeds. Most flavourings are down to personal taste, however, the ingredients that you should be rigid on are the salt and the cure#2. The cure#2 MUST be used at a ratio of 2.5g per 1000g of meat (hence the accurate scales) - this is very important to ensure a safe product to eat!! and the salt should be used at a ratio of 20g-30g per 1000g of meat - not quite as important to be as rigid as with the cure#2 but it helps keep the meat safe from nasties whilst still palatable to eat.

    As venison is very lean, I always mix it with some fatty belly pork, usually at approximately 70% venison to 30% pork, all meat coarsley minced.

    There are loads of methods of making salami, and as you look into the techiniques/methods etc you'll find all sorts of ways of keeping the meat safer/putting mold on the outside etc, but, for an average bloke with a few kitchen tools, a shed and an understanding wife, this method should see you right.

    700g venison
    300g fatty belly pork
    2.5g cure#2 (for safety reasons keep this ingredient at this ratio for 1kg of meat)
    20g sea salt
    2tbs red wine
    1tsp crushed fennel seeds
    1tsp ground black pepper
    1 clove crushed garlic

    mince the meat,
    mix all the ingredients thoroughly and leave in a non metalliic bowl in the fridge overnight
    stuff into ox runners and tie each end up into sausages
    weigh each sausage
    hang at 10-18 degrees until each sausage has lost 25%-30% of their original weight - then hey are done!!

    There is more to learn and discover, but as with most things, that can come with time and experience - the above should get you some half decent results for a first attempt.

    Good luck and I hope this helps!
    Do you put pin holes over the caseings to help drying ??
    Tried boar salami very nice.

  6. #6
    .... This is way I have my game dealer:
    Just a quick drive by, dropping of the carcasses and ordering exactly what I need and want:
    Sausages, Salami, smoked ham, smoked sausages, pure venison with or without bones, grinded venison for burgers...

    He does a great job on it, knows all the receipts, has all the equipment, plus the passion to produce on highest standards, and in between a few (or if smoked things, more) weeks, I return to pick up vacuumed tasty bits of venison!
    People's hobbies are more their measure's than are their jobs.

  7. #7
    Thanks for the replies especially legolas. Will have a go at it.I was almost put off when reading about
    the pit falls but having already bought the curing salts and casings I will put something together .
    The mother in law will like it,I will let her try it first, just in case !!!!!

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by mark g View Post
    Do you put pin holes over the caseings to help drying ??
    Tried boar salami very nice.
    Hi Mark, there's really no need to, the casings are porus and will let the moisture out slowly. The odd pin hole to remove an air pocket is fine but apart from that they're not necessary. You need to avoid something called 'case hardening' which is where the outside of the salami dries really quickly and turns almost waterproof which then, doesn't let the inside of the sausage dry out so other artificial drying aids such as fans at high speeds pointed directly at the sausages would probably do more harm then good.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Wildboar1973 View Post
    .... This is way I have my game dealer:
    Just a quick drive by, dropping of the carcasses and ordering exactly what I need and want:
    Sausages, Salami, smoked ham, smoked sausages, pure venison with or without bones, grinded venison for burgers...

    He does a great job on it, knows all the receipts, has all the equipment, plus the passion to produce on highest standards, and in between a few (or if smoked things, more) weeks, I return to pick up vacuumed tasty bits of venison!
    your a lucky man. Good salami is hard to get over here and when we get it it's from your neck of the woods or France.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Legolas View Post
    Hi Mark, there's really no need to, the casings are porus and will let the moisture out slowly. The odd pin hole to remove an air pocket is fine but apart from that they're not necessary. You need to avoid something called 'case hardening' which is where the outside of the salami dries really quickly and turns almost waterproof which then, doesn't let the inside of the sausage dry out so other artificial drying aids such as fans at high speeds pointed directly at the sausages would probably do more harm then good.
    i have got the recipe to make some salami but it never seems to work out the drying seems to be the hard part for me anyway, what about nitrite levels,it's not to good for us is it?

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