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Thread: Munites - is it just me?

  1. #1

    Munties - is it just me?

    I have just had my annual trip to Essex to a friends for Munties. Thus year was a bonanza with me getting 7 and him getting 3 fallow too. (in 3 outings)

    Now my question is this;

    I take my 30-06 as fallow are as likely to appear as munties but I find that I often seem to get poor shot placement. By this I mean the entry wounds are pretty much as expected but the exits often appear too far back/out the neck etc.

    Now the little feckers dont stand still and they really are small. I think I am suffering from not being able to tell the angles easily and a large calibre.

    I shoot plenty of roe/fallow (over 25 so far this year) and I just dont get the issues. So, honestly, is it me? or do most munty shooters get some issues compared to the bigger deer?
    Last edited by shootingduckdog; 16-03-2014 at 20:43.

  2. #2
    The smaller target area may give you larger mind problems.
    I limited myself to a maximum of 80 yards or so when I was shooting them and that was with a .308 or .30-06 cartridge from a good rest and from a high seat.
    Prior to the shot I always looked for a marker of some kind adjacent to where they were standing such as a different bush or similar so that if one did take off I had a starting point for the search.
    They are tough little rascals and even when well shot can scamper off to die in a nasty thicket somewhere.
    Of the seven species of deer which I have shot Muntjac and Sika have been the most difficult to drop where they were standing.

    HWH.

  3. #3
    I have certainly experienced this but have always assumed it is because they rarely stand still so when an opportunity arises you just have to accept that some times they are more quartered than ideal.

  4. #4
    It's definitely not just you.
    Maybe just being smaller there is less room for error ?
    I remember reading somewhere any meat off the front end of a munty is a bonus.
    They are funny/frustrating little buggers.

  5. #5
    Try stopping them with a hoy or whistle . I have to say I shoot a fair few in the neck or head and that certainly solves the problem. They dont stand still much but if you bide your time and stop them with a hoy you can generally get a decent broadside shot. When I have been on culls generally the lads that shoot a lot of big deer are the ones that make shots as you describe and some of the local lads that shoot a lot of munties bring almost 100% clean carcasses back.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by pete evans View Post
    Try stopping them with a hoy or whistle . I have to say I shoot a fair few in the neck or head and that certainly solves the problem. They dont stand still much but if you bide your time and stop them with a hoy you can generally get a decent broadside shot. When I have been on culls generally the lads that shoot a lot of big deer are the ones that make shots as you describe and some of the local lads that shoot a lot of munties bring almost 100% clean carcasses back.
    Makes good sense but for such active little critters I worry about head/neck. Can you get a "clean carcass" with a chest shot? not much left? what calibre you using?

  7. #7
    Pull your shot forward. Into the shoulder. Drops them on the spot and will help to reduce the burst stomach problems.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by shootingduckdog View Post
    Makes good sense but for such active little critters I worry about head/neck. Can you get a "clean carcass" with a chest shot? not much left? what calibre you using?
    by clean i mean no burst rumen. calibers i use are 243 with 70 grain ballistic tip 100 grain with spbt and 308 with 150 spbt. its hard to tell on all carcasses as most go to dealer and you cant tell to what degree its bruised or blood shot. to be honest when skinned most shot square in the front end has a reasonable amount of meat the 100 grain 243 for me has produced the cleanest carcasses.

  9. #9
    Because of their size, it is not easy to tell exactly how they are standing. As Hubert says, if you limit the range then it is less of a problem. I sometimes shoot them at long(er) range (150 yds) as we need to control numbers so I just try to take them well up front with my .243. That way usually puts them down and as there is little meat on the front end, there is not much lost. Too far back and that is a whole different matter with a big mess and carcass left for the foxes and badgers.
    As others have said, they are busy little creatures and the shots I have messed up were usually at longer range with the beast turning away in the split second of firing.
    The most extreme example was a Texas Heart Shot on a Doe who was feeding along the edge of a cover strip.
    I find that trying to shoot them in the head or neck at more than 50 yds is a pointless exercise, owing to their movement and leading to missed shots and educated Muntjac.
    Whilst others find whistling or shouting stops them, my experience has been that they just bu***r off with the tail flagged. No doubt its 'The way I tell 'em'.
    As far as larger calibres are concerned, I have shot a few with the 30-06 and subject to shot placement, there is no more damage than with smaller cartridges. So keep well forward with whatever cartridge you use and don't worry too much if the front end is scrapped.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by jubnut View Post
    Pull your shot forward. Into the shoulder. Drops them on the spot and will help to reduce the burst stomach problems.
    I'm with you jubnut .

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