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Thread: Do you crimp your home loads?

  1. #1

    Do you crimp your home loads?

    I have looked at some older posts on the benefits of crimping rifle ammo.

    There seems to be 2 main camps.

    Camp 1 are firmly believing that you MUST crimp ammo that is intended for hunting use, the theory is hunting ammo can get some abuse, partly due to the inertia of recoil which can cause the other rounds that are in the magazine to have their OAL shortened.

    Camp 2 seem to firmly believe that any round they make does NOT need to be crimped no matter what the intended application is.

    I have been crimping my ammo thus far on all my 270 rounds, I have been using a Lee Factory crimp die. I have been getting some great results.

    The next batch I make, I will make 10 identical rounds, half crimped and half not. I will then fire a group of each and see what difference it makes. If I remember I will post some photos of the difference (if any).

    I am keen to hear what other people do. I have asked all my friends that reload and the jury is still out for me.

    Cheers

  2. #2
    Crimper Muir will be along to spill the powder on this one.

    K

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by 270Buck View Post
    ....
    The next batch I make, I will make 10 identical rounds, half crimped and half not. I will then fire a group of each and see what difference it makes. If I remember I will post some photos of the difference (if any)...
    Whatever approach you use, each load needs to be individually worked up. Your test above will be comparing apples with oranges. I'm sure if you started from scratch with your current brass, powder and bullets you could work up a better crimped load and a better un-crimped load.

    It doesn't really matter what you do, as long as you do the same thing every time and you're happy with the results (and they're safe).

    Have fun.

    JCS

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by jcampbellsmith View Post
    Whatever approach you use, each load needs to be individually worked up. Your test above will be comparing apples with oranges. I'm sure if you started from scratch with your current brass, powder and bullets you could work up a better crimped load and a better un-crimped load.

    It doesn't really matter what you do, as long as you do the same thing every time and you're happy with the results (and they're safe).

    Have fun.

    JCS
    I realise consistency is key, I am sure I will continue crimping my 270 rounds anyway. Why change or alter a load that I am getting 5 shot groups of 0.5MOA.

    I will however be getting my 243 back from being re-built in a few week, hopefully. When I working up a new load I am wondering if I need to crimp or not. I have asked numerous folk and they have differing opinions. Whatever I choose to do it will be consistent.

    Cheers

  5. #5
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    I did a sdie by side test on this and found that the Lee Factory Crimp die made not enough difference to the accuracy to be noticeably better but that a standard un-crimped cartridge was just that very, very, slightly more accurate.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by enfieldspares View Post
    I did a sdie by side test on this and found that the Lee Factory Crimp die made not enough difference to the accuracy to be noticeably better but that a standard un-crimped cartridge was just that very, very, slightly more accurate.
    Very interesting.

    What are your thoughts about after taking a shot the rounds being knocked around in the magazine box and thus reducing the OAL?

    This is the main point one of my mates stresses, he is in the MUST crimp camp. He claims that he had made a batch of rounds and all had the same COAL, he checked every one. After a few outings after deer and or fox, he out of interest checked the rounds and some had differing COAL. Some rounds may have been in the magazine a few times and therefore have felt the recoil a few times. I cannot remember exactly what difference in length there was but he says it was enough for him to pull the bullets and start again, this time crimping!!
    Last edited by 270Buck; 20-03-2014 at 14:56.

  7. #7
    crimping CAN help
    so can a lot of things

    Try it, if it works and makes them better do it.

    I crimp my .222 loads because it tightens the groups up
    I crimp my 300WM loads because I want the bullets in the cartridges in the magazine to stay in place!

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by bewsher500 View Post
    crimping CAN help
    so can a lot of things

    Try it, if it works and makes them better do it.

    I crimp my .222 loads because it tightens the groups up
    I crimp my 300WM loads because I want the bullets in the cartridges in the magazine to stay in place!
    Fair enough if it works then stick with it.

    The investment of crimping dies for all my calibres is what is putting me off!!! I must have some Yorkshireman in me!!!

    Also the availability, as the Lee 270 factory crimp die was not the easiest to get hold of.

  9. #9
    Really depends on application. I do not crimp low recoil cartridges for use in bolt guns or cartridges used single-shots, the exception is for BP cartridges and in that case I normally use a taper crimp. I do crimp (lightly roll crimp) cartridges used in semi-auto's or heavy recoiling cartridges used in bolt guns. Obviously these can suffer from bullet setback from the violence of feeding or the pounding within the magazine from the firing of other rounds. On Revolvers I also crimp to ensure the bullet does not jump forward out of the case and tie up the rotation of the cylinder.

    SS

  10. #10
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    On Muir's advice I would have definitely have started crimping a while ago but the nosler 100gr bullets I use don't have the cannelure which I have read in some manuals as essential for crimping. This weekend I'll stack the magazine and leave the bottom round in over a number of firings and measure the OAL before and after out of interest.

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