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Thread: Mystery shotgun

  1. #1

    Mystery shotgun

    Inherited an old shotgun. Only markings on it is the name Daniel O'Connor which is engraved onto each sidelock. This name and 72 Parliament St, Dublin is also engraved down the rib. Like I said this is an old hammer action s/s and any info would be much appreciated. Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    I cant help with the i.d of it but id love to see a few pics as i love old hammer guns the style and creativity you see in some

  3. #3
    I would guess its a quite old SBS hammer action the maker not being Daniel O' Connor of 72 Parliament Street Dublin.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Stu Mc View Post
    Inherited an old shotgun. Only markings on it is the name Daniel O'Connor which is engraved onto each sidelock. This name and 72 Parliament St, Dublin is also engraved down the rib. Like I said this is an old hammer action s/s and any info would be much appreciated. Thanks in advance.
    If you are able to post pictures, then include a clear close-up of the proof marks on the flats of the barrels too. I, amongst others, should then be able to give you some more information.

  5. #5
    Parliament street was very much the heart of the Dublin gun making area. Trulock brothers were at no. 13 Parliament street, William Kavanagh was around the corner on Dame St. and Rigby' were on Suffolk Street. Garnett and Keegan's continued to sell guns on Parliment St. when I was young! I cannot find any reference to Daniel O'Connor in the business directories from 1850, 1862, 1870 or 1884. However that doesn't mean much as he may not of traded for long. However a more worrying problem is that Parliament Street is a short street. There is no number 72. Proof marks could narrow things down.

  6. #6
    Name on the barrels does can mean the vendor not the maker. There again it can be both.

    Blackpowder

  7. #7
    Thanks for the info so far guys some interesting stuff there. I've attached some photos which I hope may help to shed some light.
    The 72 could quite possibly be a 12 as there is a bit of pitting around the lettering on the rib which makes it hard to read, even with a magnifying glass (it has been lying in an unused stable block for who knows how long). Sadly I have no info at all on this as my father in law passed without ever mentioning it.

    Stu
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails image.jpg   image.jpg   image.jpg  

  8. #8
    Couple of other photos showing the interesting fore end lock.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails image.jpg   image.jpg  

  9. #9
    The best I can do for you without handling the gun is... The action would appear to be a Henry Jones double screw grip patent of 1859. The Jones action is not a 'snap' action. The proof marks are English for black-powder only and are most likely to be late 1800s. Nitro proof did not become compulsory until 1925 and there were many transitional arrangements at various dates. If the words 'Not for ball' are stamped anywhere on the barrels, then that would put the gun between 1875 and 1887. In 1887 the words 'not for ball' were replaced by the word 'Choke'.
    The locks look like 'back action'. If the locks are rebounding i.e. hammer will not fall on the pin without the trigger being depressed, then that was patented by Stanton in 1869. If they are 'half cock' locks then that design is very much earlier.
    The Jones action, wedge-type forend fastening and back action locks are all very common as they were so strong and serviceable. Unless the locks are rebounding, then I could only state with certainty that the gun is pre 1925. These old designs continued to be made long after more modern types were commonplace.
    The letters CH seem to be stamped on the bottom rib. That could be a clue to the maker or the barrel maker ? Maybe but then again maybe not.
    I could bore you to distraction on the subject of vintage and antique shotguns. So to spare others..... PM me if you think I can help further.

  10. #10
    Proof marks look like Birmingham black powder proof between 1868 and 1875. The '13' means it is a 13 bore barrel. Fore end is held by a captive wedge system which was a left over from muzzle loaders. This means it is an early breech loader which only really came into being with a modern style cartridge in 1861. There was no Irish proof house so impossible to say if made in Ireland. As Red Dot said it is likely that it was made in Birmingham and sold in Dublin, though there were still a lot of guns being made in Ireland at the time. Hope that is of some help.

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