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Thread: First lamping with the lad

  1. #1

    First lamping with the lad

    My lad turned 6 last week. He started coming out for a walk around or spot of decoying with me last Spring and then onto evening rabbits last summer. Having added the centre fire last September and taken a couple of deer, then five foxes under the lamp since Christmas, he's been pestering relentlessly to join me on my deer and fox outings.

    Receiving my DSC1 pass last week, I can finally head out for deer on my own at my second (and only deer) permission a little distance away and planned to do so over Easter. Not feeling it right to leave him out any longer, thinking he is showing signs of being old enough to move cross country in the dark (which we will need to do to be in the best position for the deer at first light) and realising that if he can't do something, it's primarily only because I haven't taught him sufficiently, I took him out lamping tonight to see how he would get on. I confess I was extremely nervous as to whether he would be quiet enough, not mess around, not get scared, wander off or get left behind and most importantly, be safe. Indeed, I'd even resigned myself to not even making the rifle ready, rather just watching him like a hawk.

    I clearly didn't give him half the credit he has proven to be due. I've drummed into him to "always be behind the gun" from the start and true to form, he stayed there just behind my shoulder for the ~2-miles we walked, cross fields, under fences and over gates. Every time I raised the rifle onto the sticks, he would even drop back a pace or two and lie down. He was absolutely as good as gold and having seen two foxes (plus two roe does and several rabbits and hares) and not been able to get close enough or have them respond to a call, I was much relieved when finally able to get close enough to a third.



    He was absolutely beaming and most upset I wouldn't let him take the fox home to show mum. However, he's clearly brighter than I gave him credit for, as he said, "well at least let me take the tail Dad"

    Absolutely priceless and so glad I trusted the training he's already had and him being mature enough to assume the added responsibility. I'm still nervous about going after the deer on my own, especially with him in tow, but at least I know he will be fine and we can learn and enjoy gaining the experience together.

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by tjm160 View Post
    My lad turned 6 last week. He started coming out for a walk around or spot of decoying with me last Spring and then onto evening rabbits last summer. Having added the centre fire last September and taken a couple of deer, then five foxes under the lamp since Christmas, he's been pestering relentlessly to join me on my deer and fox outings.

    Receiving my DSC1 pass last week, I can finally head out for deer on my own at my second (and only deer) permission a little distance away and planned to do so over Easter. Not feeling it right to leave him out any longer, thinking he is showing signs of being old enough to move cross country in the dark (which we will need to do to be in the best position for the deer at first light) and realising that if he can't do something, it's primarily only because I haven't taught him sufficiently, I took him out lamping tonight to see how he would get on. I confess I was extremely nervous as to whether he would be quiet enough, not mess around, not get scared, wander off or get left behind and most importantly, be safe. Indeed, I'd even resigned myself to not even making the rifle ready, rather just watching him like a hawk.

    I clearly didn't give him half the credit he has proven to be due. I've drummed into him to "always be behind the gun" from the start and true to form, he stayed there just behind my shoulder for the ~2-miles we walked, cross fields, under fences and over gates. Every time I raised the rifle onto the sticks, he would even drop back a pace or two and lie down. He was absolutely as good as gold and having seen two foxes (plus two roe does and several rabbits and hares) and not been able to get close enough or have them respond to a call, I was much relieved when finally able to get close enough to a third.



    He was absolutely beaming and most upset I wouldn't let him take the fox home to show mum. However, he's clearly brighter than I gave him credit for, as he said, "well at least let me take the tail Dad"

    Absolutely priceless and so glad I trusted the training he's already had and him being mature enough to assume the added responsibility. I'm still nervous about going after the deer on my own, especially with him in tow, but at least I know he will be fine and we can learn and enjoy gaining the experience together.
    bloody brilliant ive got three lads all grown now the have all shot but not took an interest in it my grandkids on the other hand pester me week in week out, so i wait for a shitty night and take one of them youngest is seven oldest thirteen and they love it, so just to keep a smile on his face for a few years more give him the tail, atb doug memories last forever,
    DONT START

  3. #3
    Well done mate....great read and an excellent result and lovely memories to cherish too...Hugh.

  4. #4
    Great result and well done with your dsc1 to

  5. #5
    Excellent stuff! My grandson has just had his 2nd birthday - how much longer before I can take him out foxing, I wonder?

  6. #6
    Thanks and too true Doug and Hugh, getting out and sharing the passion with the bairns really is something else. The tail is in the shed until the rest of the organic material stops smelling. Not sure the missus would be too happy with him (or me) if he had it in his bedroom sooner

    Thanks Simon, didn't get to celebrate last weekend as had already had the weeks vino ration, but will certainly be making up for it tonight

    Cheers Paddy and just get one of these and crack on


  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by tjm160 View Post
    Cheers Paddy and just get one of these and crack on
    I think that'd be just the job for my Good Lady!

  8. #8
    lol, well, all the other pics I could find were of ladies. I'm not sure the Badger Conservation Society would be very pleased with me borrowing the only one I could find of a bloke using, but needs must

  9. #9
    Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	40283last summer my daughter who was 8 at the time came out for a walk with us, just as we were heading back to the car as the last rays of light were dissapearing from the sky she spotted this fox, i couldn't shoot it at first as it was on the brow of the field. i explained this to her & then she just started squeaking with her lips on the back of her hand... the fox run in like she was calling the dog! she was beaming for days after!!

  10. #10
    Excellent write up and kudos for bringing another young hunter along too. Just watch him taking the tail into show and tell at school - could be a fun discussion with the teacher haha.

    I think it's a great opportunity to buy him an air rifle as a belated birthday present!

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