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Thread: Quick killing v meat saving projectiles ?

  1. #1

    Quick killing v meat saving projectiles ?

    Copper v lead core /bonded thoughts please chaps.
    Iv just gone back to accubonds in the .300 as I was getting very mixed results with barnes ttsx, sometimes they would work fine animals would buckle in a heap then what would appear to be a good chest shot would run on as if you had missed only to collapse after some distance something I had never experienced with the bonded stuff ie accubonds in that particular rifle anyway and everything that I have used them on have literally been bang flops albeit with more meat damage particulally with smaller deer which was the only reason a changed to barnes.
    Maybe its that particular calibre maybe the speed I don't know but its put me off them, for clean carcasses and minimal meat damage I found them superb + good accuracy. and it wouldn't be too much of a bother if I wasnt working on a tight boundary where if they ran only a small way into deep cover any animal of decent weight is going to be a nightmare to extract ! anyone else had less than satisfactory results from barnes ?

  2. #2
    tries gmx in the .308 but it was just too slow to really open up the bullet and the acted more like a fmj that an expanding bullet, real poor results so shelved them. The lead copper offerings are just better and certainly softer and more dependable at mid velocities anyway.

  3. #3
    would love to try some TTSX in the 300WM
    they only go up to 180gr though. is that because you really need to push them to open?

    have some CoreLokt in 180gr which apparently are a very good expander
    Can't fault the Lapua Megas though in .300
    I have had very good results with lowly old Hornady Interlocks in .243 and .270 though

  4. #4
    Look at rifles which kill without a lot of meat damage, like the 6.5x55 SWE with a 140-gr bullet at less than 2,600 fps, or a 7x57mm 154 gr at 2500 fps, 8x57 with 196 gr at 2,600 fps. The magnums are designed to deliver the same sort of energy, at longer range. If you shoot a deer with a 130-gr at 3,100 fps at 100 yards, instead of 250 yards, expect bloodshot meat. Expect lots of the kinetic energy to be consumed mechanically in melting and fragmenting the bullet, or on a tree behind the exit wound.

    The TTSX and TSX, according to Barnes, are designed to open up fully at 1,800 fps. Barnes even gives some reduced loads for both of them, with MVs under 2,500 fps and even 2,000 fps, which they use for testing expansion on ballistic gel at 25 yards or so, to simulate long range shots.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Southern View Post
    Look at rifles which kill without a lot of meat damage, like the 6.5x55 SWE with a 140-gr bullet at less than 2,600 fps
    +1
    I have 140gr SSTs leaving my 6.5x55 at 2,660fps.

    As everything I shoot goes into my own freezer, I'm less worried about damage than others and this round drops everything into its own shadow with a nice big exit wound
    Sako 75 6.5x55mm-Z6i 3-18x50. MauserM12 .308-SIII 6-24x50. Beretta 690 III Field 12b.
    "You have enemies? Good. That means you’ve stood up for something, sometime in your life."
    Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill (1874-1965)

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Southern View Post
    If you shoot a deer with a 130-gr at 3,100 fps at 100 yards, instead of 250 yards, expect bloodshot meat. Expect lots of the kinetic energy to be consumed mechanically in melting and fragmenting the bullet, or on a tree behind the exit wound.
    not always
    two from 6 months ago, same trip

    130gr .270 Interlock roughly 3000fps MV
    shot at 35 yds
    massive expansion bullet lodged under skin on opposite side
    no meat damage on either shoulder





    300WM 180gr Lapua Mega at roughly 3100fps MV
    shot at 100yds
    through and through 3/4" entry, 1" exit
    zero meat damage or bloodied shoulders




    Stag Do!

  7. #7
    But how repeatable and predictable is that performance of the .270 and .300 WM at close range?

    I have seen a hot 6.5x55mm 120-gr zip through a 140-lb whitetail deer's chest with no expansion, at 25 yards.
    But shoot that deer at 200 yards with the same bullet and I bet it would have great performance 10 times in a row.

    Likewise, if I am hunting in the woods, on foot, with my Mannlicher carbine .270 Win, it will be loaded with 150-gr RN at an MV of 2,700 fps, because I expect shots from 35 to 150 yards and I know I will get full expansion, high weight retention, and an exit wound, and probably the deer or hog knocked over on the spot.

  8. #8
    Velocity was over 3400 fps with 95 gns of rl25 so they should have opened up

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Southern View Post
    But how repeatable and predictable is that performance of the .270 and .300 WM at close range?
    well the last three or four deer I shot with the .270 have all been under 50yd chest shots
    none were bruised or full of blood between or in the surrounding muscle

  10. #10
    Drop your bullet weights when using Barnes. I use 120 grain in my 6 1/2 and it's great.

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