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Thread: Non floating barrel

  1. #1

    Non floating barrel

    Recently bought a ruger hawkeye to put nv on the barrel is not floating would it be beneficial to float it.

  2. #2
    It's designed with a pressure point so not sure it's a good idea to float the barrel?

  3. #3
    Not if it is shooting ok as it is. There is a scientific reason why some rifles have a resting point at the end of the stock but it is never guaranteed to work as it relies on the barrel oscillating in exact synchronisation with a given point when the bullet leaves the muzzle.

    Personally I'm only happy when the barrel is freefloating but if its not broke don't fix it. You should try different ammo before this.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Tackleberry270 View Post
    Not if it is shooting ok as it is. There is a scientific reason why some rifles have a resting point at the end of the stock but it is never guaranteed to work as it relies on the barrel oscillating in exact synchronisation with a given point when the bullet leaves the muzzle.

    Personally I'm only happy when the barrel is freefloating but if its not broke don't fix it. You should try different ammo before this.
    I think the only reason for a pressure bedding is to keep the possibly crooked stock in a position that the gap left and right of the barrel to the stock are equal. Cheap to do but looks quality. Many people think that the quality of a rifle can be measured by the size of the gap between barrel and stock. Small gap = higher quality , small gap and equal left right = even higher quality.

    I think pressure bedding could work for a target rifle that is shot in a very consistent way. Hunting rifles and most target rifles benefit from a large barrel-stock gap and free floating. I even stopped bedding the first inch or so of the barrel.

    edi

  5. #5
    The Remington 700 is designed to have a pressure point under the barrel.
    So is the No.1 MkIII Enfield and the No.4 Mik I and MkII.
    So are a lot of rifles. Many custom rifles were full length bedded and shoot super groups.

    It has become Internet lore that every rifle must be free floated, for two reasons.
    1. Some big target rifles and military sniper rifles were made that way.
    2. It is cheaper to manufacture, like front wheel drive on a car, so the manufacturers sold it as if it were something better.

    In a sense, that is true. If you don't have the skill or precision manufacturing to fit the action and barrel into a stock, or it is going to be used in an environment which will mess with the stability, then a clearance around the barrel is better. But then you need a much better bedding of the action.

  6. #6
    Southern, just have a look at what happens physically if you put a pressure bedded rifle on a bipod vs off a bag further back.
    Pressure bedding is absolute bs on a hunting rifle. As I said might work on a target rifle.
    A hunting rifle must shoot consistent, no matter what the shooting position.

    I actually find that those who always recommend pressure bedding are those who are not in favour of longer shots...wonder why?
    edi

  7. #7
    ok, let's take a step back here! pressure bedding was/is used to obtain 'acceptable' accuracy. you will usually get decent groups, but rarely excellent groups. that is because of the obvious inconsistencies any interference in the barrel harmonics make.

    any barrel can be made floating, and if bedded properly at the action end, it's likely that it will improve its accuracy and consistency as well.

    Paul, if you are not happy with the grouping, yes, float it, but have it properly bedded, or do it yourself if you know how/can learn how.

    don't float a barrel that's not properly supported at the action end, that's why you tend to hear stories of people floating barrels and grouping getting worse.

    there's no barrels that are designed for bedding nor any designed for floating,nor receivers, they're all mostly made the same way, that's all a pile of fairy tale Sh*t.

    there's no magical myths to this.

    brithunter will of course provide us with a story of many rifles that were accurante and fully bedded, and he's right to do so, but the fact remains that pressure bedding is and always will be a way to resolve 'other' fundamental problems in a rifles construction such as poor receiver inletting, or concentricity between barrel and action, a misaligned bore drilling or bad chambering job, etc.

    some contentious debaters may come and say that's why midland and PH's were often pressure bedded

  8. #8
    We all know that putting pressure on a barrel will change parameters that change the POI. Changing the pressure therefore changes the POI. The elasticity of a wooden stock will change with changing temperature and moisture, a plastic stock can also change stiffness with changing temperatures, this alone leads to changing pressures. In pressure bedded rifles all stocks including alu/composite will transfer the pressure of a bipod or a forward rested rifle directly onto the barrel, in other words bend the barrel upwards. If you hold your rifle or lay it up around the action area one doesn't have that pressure....more changing pressures.

    This all means that when you take your pressure bedded especially wooden stocked rifle out of the safe, you do not know for sure where your POI will be. Resting the rifle on the forend for a shot is also a bit of a lottery.

    If the stock doesn't touch the barrel you don't have any of these problems. This is not witchcraft or voodoo.
    edi

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by PKL View Post
    some contentious debaters may come and say that's why midland and PH's were often pressure bedded
    Is it rather just because that is the way things were done at the time?

    My 1982 SAKO AII had pressure-points in the forend, whereas my mid-'70s Parker-Hale target-rifle was built entirely free-floating except the first inch or two, which are bedded.

  10. #10
    ejg,
    That's the theory, but in reality, some totally unbedded barrels, especially thin ones, with vibrate too much and be inaccurate or accurate only with one load.

    I have seen wood stocked riles with the barrel fastened firmly to a wooden stock, like the M-14, shoot 5/8 inch groups any time with military ball ammo and iron sights. Lots of stock AR-15A2 rifles will shoot way sub-MOA. I have an Enfield No.4 sniper rifle which has never shot a group worse than 3/4 inch with anything, without any adjustment or tuning, since the day it was tuned by Hollarnd & Holland in 1950.

    Free floating just isn't right for every rifle. And if you buy a rifle built by a real craftsman at G&H, H&H, Paul Jaeger, Marholdt, Mannlicher, etc it will probably shoot tight groups, and it would be foolish to mess with their bedding job.

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