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Thread: Selling venison into the human foodchain

  1. #1

    Selling venison into the human foodchain

    I am interested to hear what is required in the UK today, if you wish to sell Venison for human consumption (wild not farmed).

    Would someone in the know be willing to write a short synopsis on the subject so I can use it for comparisons to the NZ rules? Thanks

  2. #2

  3. #3
    Thanks. That is a good start

    so do you think that this staement by a kiwi hunter would be correct ?

    Pengy, in pomeland if you have the ticket ( not hard) you can sell direct to the pub and the public.

    NZ is known to have the toughest laws, and that's all down to our export market.
    Last edited by Timbo61; 14-04-2014 at 10:26.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Timbo61 View Post
    Thanks. That is a good start

    so do you think that this staement by a kiwi hunter would be correct ?
    Pengy, in pomeland if you have the ticket ( not hard) you can sell direct to the pub and the public.

    NZ is known to have the toughest laws, and that's all down to our export market.
    In a word NO.
    He's wrong twice in the first sentence.
    It's the calibre of the shooter that counts not the calibre of the rifle.

  5. #5
    Would you care to expand on that ?

  6. #6
    1) Generally it would be much easier to get a licence for firearms in NZ than in the U.K. Frankly for the average Joe it can be a right royal pain in the arse as we probably have some of the most restrictive firearms legislation in the world.

    2) As explained in the link that JCS gave you there are a number of restrictions on selling venison to the general public and can involve registering as a food premise with the local authority and providing the right environment and food handling equipment. In fact to sell deer in their jackets to a game dealer you should have approved hunter status which is gained by examination.
    It's the calibre of the shooter that counts not the calibre of the rifle.

  7. #7
    In England and Wales the Wild Game Guide describes the situation. Which is very liberal.

    We may sell basic carcasses, unskinned i.e. "in the fur" to friends, family, the public, local retail outlets, butchers, pubs, restaurants etc. with absolutely no qualifications or registration with e.g. environmental health depts. whatsoever. No paperwork, no tags, no traceability, cash in hand at the back door, no receipts, all perfectly legal.

    If we want to skin and butcher the carcass and sell the cut meat locally to the same sort of customers, farmers markets, etc. we may do so, but must also register with our local authority as a food business, which may require our premises to be inspected to a certain standard.

    In fact the "Trained Hunter" qualification is only legally required when selling carcasses to Approved Game Handling Establishments. (sometimes incorrectly referred to as game dealers). And it is also required to be registered as a food business to sell to AGHEs.

    The UK has obtained several exemptions from EU legislation which enable this. E.g. the "Hunter Exemption" and the "Retail Exemption".

    In Scotland the rules are tighter, generally speaking an individual stalker may only sell carcases to a licensed venison dealer.

  8. #8
    I think you need to sell all carcases with a tag on them, whether its to a gamedealer or not. You do not need to tag them if you are consuming it yourself or giving it to friends and family. That's the reason for taking Level 1, it gives you the right to sell into the foodchain up to 300 carcases a year providing they have been checked and tagged.
    All grades of deer stalkers/hunters in the UK and overseas catered for. Level 2 DMQ signing off available. Over 30 years experience in the stalking/hunting industry. For friendly and professional help go to www.UKOutfitters.co.uk

    ZEISS PRO STALKER.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by sikamalc View Post
    I think you need to sell all carcases with a tag on them, whether its to a gamedealer or not. You do not need to tag them if you are consuming it yourself or giving it to friends and family. That's the reason for taking Level 1, it gives you the right to sell into the foodchain up to 300 carcases a year providing they have been checked and tagged.
    Full traceability is essential.
    Unless you are selling deer 'in fur' direct to the final consumer or local retailer you are also required to be a registered food business (in England). This includes sales to an Approved Game Handling Establishment (AGHE).
    MS

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by sikamalc View Post
    I think you need to sell all carcases with a tag on them, whether its to a gamedealer or not. You do not need to tag them if you are consuming it yourself or giving it to friends and family. That's the reason for taking Level 1, it gives you the right to sell into the foodchain up to 300 carcases a year providing they have been checked and tagged.
    It is not actually a legal requirement to be a "trained person" if you are selling carcasses under the "primary producer" exemption, or prepared meat under the "hunter exemption", directly to the final consumer, or to a local retailer. In this case tags are not a legal requirement. DSC1, "Trained Hunter" etc. is not a requirement. No qualifications of any sort are necessary. Though obviously it is better to have some.

    They are only a legal requirement when selling to an AGHE.

    This is explained in the Wild Game Guide.

    E.g. chapter 7:

    "Where individual hunters are supplying direct to local retailers or to final consumers under the primary producer exemption or the hunter exemption, if they are not able to draw on the specific expertise of a trained person, they should be particularly vigilant."

    Also there is no longer any particular limit on quantities etc. Eg. chapter 4:

    "PRIMARY PRODUCER EXEMPTION
    There is an exemption from the above rules when supply involves small quantities of in-fur/in-feather carcases supplied either direct to the final consumer and/or to local retailers that directly supply the final consumer.
    In the UK these terms are currently being interpreted as follows:

    •Small quantities are now regarded as self-defining because demand for in-fur/in-feather carcases from final consumers and local retailers is limited.


    •Local is within the supplying establishment’s own county plus the greater of either the neighbouring county or counties or 50 km/30 miles from the boundary of the supplying establishment’s county.


    • Direct supply to the final consumer is not restricted by what is local. An individual or an estate can supply final consumers who order from them via the internet/mail order as well as those who collect themselves.
    "
    Last edited by Sharpie; 15-04-2014 at 10:50. Reason: added prepared meat

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