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Thread: southpaws and lefties

  1. #1
    SD Regular
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    southpaws and lefties

    While my keyboard fingers are in the mood....I'd be interested to know how many of you folks are left-handed shooters and how many actually use proper southpaw rifles.


  2. #2

    left handers

    I'm one and dont I know it!

    Just run the gauntlet of changing my rifle and settled on a Sauer 202.

    Never heard so much ******** in my life, (Buying New) Dealer says, 'you want a new lefthand rifle, dont get much call for them, can get you one but you will have to pay extra'

    (Trading in) 'you want to trade in a lefthander, hard to sell so cant offer as much as a righthander'

    (Buying secondhand) 'Yea, its lefthanded, very sought after and dont get many, thats why its more than a righthander.

    I think it all smacks of descrimination, so do Sauer who do not charge extra for lefthand.

  3. #3

    Lefties

    Stephen,
    Yep, count me in. My first rifle a BSA CF2 in .243 (BSA haven't heard of left handers). I have never had problems operating the bolt, although have often taken a bit of ribbing from fellow competitors when rapid firing on Bisley ranges.

    A few years later a Left Hand Sako 75 in 6.5x55 Swedish with a Barrel by Medwell & Perret came my way. I am continually amazed by its accuracy no matter what I put through it.

    Last year a BSA CF2 Stutzen came along in 6.5x55. It is in pretty well mint condition and has had very few rounds through it. There is a bit of creep in the trigger and both BSAs have a heavier pull than the Sako but are only really noticable when using the three rifles side by side, when zeroing or competition.

  4. #4
    I'm a right handed shooter and was offered a Left handed Blazer on the grounds that it's easier to reload a left handed blazer whilst being able to take a second shot on another animal should the opertunity present it self without having to move my hand away from the trigger or move very much at all.

    But I think left handed shooters do get a rough deal in a right handed world.

  5. #5
    I currently suffer a T3 .243 right hand bolt and want to change to a left handed bolt, talk to the gun shops and all of a sudden they all start woeing and greiffing,WHY WHY WHY do they want to sell rifles. Then chuck in the fact that I fancy it in 300wsm and look out,I think I need help
    HELP HELP HELP

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by charleneshooting
    I currently suffer a T3 .243 right hand bolt and want to change to a left handed bolt, talk to the gun shops and all of a sudden they all start woeing and greiffing,WHY WHY WHY do they want to sell rifles. Then chuck in the fact that I fancy it in 300wsm and look out,I think I need help
    HELP HELP HELP
    Charlene

    Your plea for help is answered, follow this link he has left hand Tikkas, Remmington and Sauers in .243 and a new Mauser in .300 wm. Bit pricey that one, but it is a luxes though.

    http://www.rmacleod.co.uk/RIFLE%20PRICE%20LIST.pdf

    Thar

  7. #7
    well I`ll be when did they start making L/H T3`s? looking for something different as I`ve had the T3 for a while now,what do you guys think about Remingtons?

  8. #8
    SD Regular
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    are you still wanting the 300wsm? because you might struggle to get a left hander

  9. #9
    The only problem that I am aware of with the Remmington 700 is the receiver rotating, but according to the US sites this only starts to happen with bullet weights above 170gn and you are pushing them hard. In fairness these guys are long-range varminters. The chance of it occurring with a stalking rifle are minimal.

    The background around are as follows, because the Remmington action is cylindrical the only thing that stops it rotating in the stock is the recoil lug, (when a bullet is shot up the barrel it is being spun in one direction and in turn tries to rotate the barrel/action in the other direction). The recoil lug on a Remminton is sandwiched between the barrel and the receiver. The only thing that stops it rotating is the amount of clamping pressure that occurs when the barrel is screwed on to the receiver. Once it starts to move the only thing that stops it is the side of action screws coming into contact with the stock, this would have a adverse effect on the rifles accuracy.

    The US military tried a larger recoil lug to try and stop this but it did not help, which if you think about it logically it would not as they had still the same amount of clamping pressure on the bigger lug.

    If it is a rifle to be used for hunting/stalking I would not let the above put me off, it would only be a concern if you were in a target rich environment and using a heavy calibre.

    Thar

  10. #10

    Left handers

    Did you notice that the stalker at the top of this, and every other, page is a left hander, very normal i would say!!

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