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Thread: Larder vs. Butcher question from a newcomer

  1. #1

    Larder vs. Butcher question from a newcomer

    Hi All,
    A quick question. I'm just setting out on what will hopefully be a lifetime of stalking but don't really have space at home for a larder or even a big fridge just for hanging carcasses. Does anyone know if it's possible to get deer butchered by your average village butcher? If so, what kind of cost would I be looking at? And would I need some kind of game handling qualification e.g. DSC2? I'm not stalking on my own yet so this is a fair way off. Just curious.

    Thanks to anyone with advice.
    Mike

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by mikeakc View Post
    Hi All,
    A quick question. I'm just setting out on what will hopefully be a lifetime of stalking but don't really have space at home for a larder or even a big fridge just for hanging carcasses. Does anyone know if it's possible to get deer butchered by your average village butcher? If so, what kind of cost would I be looking at? And would I need some kind of game handling qualification e.g. DSC2? I'm not stalking on my own yet so this is a fair way off. Just curious.

    Thanks to anyone with advice.
    Mike
    Mike,

    I have found that if you are a regular customer of a traditional butcher he will likely entertain you.
    You bring it in at an agreed time out of jacket and he will do it then and there. Never goes into his "storage".
    Mine doesn't like venison himself and only asks for a fiver for the biscuit tin.

    He gets more in kind in other ways.

    Stan

  3. #3
    Make sure the butcher has a game handling licence so if any inspectors walk in they wont get into trouble. If not ask him to do it at the house......atb scott

  4. #4
    it a tricky one but butchers are well known for bending a few rules lol . if you are regular customer like said above ,if you offer a carcase if you can spare one or 20 . and I would think that would work ,I know that some charge by the kg on the bone
    Last edited by berg; 24-04-2014 at 06:39.

  5. #5
    +1for what Smullery said , get to know your ocal butcher it will also benefit you with better quality day to day meat and products. Also what about any abottoirs /slaughter houses they will process the carcasses.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by griffshrek View Post
    +1for what Smullery said , get to know your ocal butcher it will also benefit you with better quality day to day meat and products. Also what about any abottoirs /slaughter houses they will process the carcasses.
    No they wont . Again its only what the cutting plants are licensed to handle . Some cant even cut beef from cattle over 24 months old its all rules and regulations nowadays

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by griffshrek View Post
    +1for what Smullery said , get to know your ocal butcher it will also benefit you with better quality day to day meat and products. Also what about any abottoirs /slaughter houses they will process the carcasses.
    You can only take meat to an EEC approved cutting plant if you are EU approved and/or the carcasse has been inspected by a meat inspector ,in short it needs a stamp of health or the will not touch it.I wouldnt't even go to a abottoir you might open a whole can of worms for your self .

  8. #8
    To be honest I'd try it yourself! I've only processed 1 myself so far but using info from here and youtube I think I made a decent job of it considering it was my first. I don't have anywhere to hang/chill and the buck was skinned and jointed the day it was shot with the joints going in the fridge overnight. I finished the butchering the next day with most being bagged and put in the freezer. The meat was fantastic. It was also pretty satisfying to complete the whole field-to-plate journey myself.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by andyf View Post
    To be honest I'd try it yourself! I've only processed 1 myself so far but using info from here and youtube I think I made a decent job of it considering it was my first. I don't have anywhere to hang/chill and the buck was skinned and jointed the day it was shot with the joints going in the fridge overnight. I finished the butchering the next day with most being bagged and put in the freezer. The meat was fantastic. It was also pretty satisfying to complete the whole field-to-plate journey myself.
    Hi Andy,
    That's interesting to hear. I'd hoped this was the case as I'd like to do the butchery myself but I heard that the meat is almost jelly like before it's been hung and doesn't handle as well. Is it something you could do in the kitchen whilst the other half is out? Or is the blood still too runny to entertain this idea?

    Thanks for all the advice as usual everyone!

  10. #10
    Do it yourself. Even with limited space it's really quite easy to separate the carcass into about 6 pieces after which any average kitchen can handle it.

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