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Thread: Japanise Balsom

  1. #1

    Japanise Balsom

    one of the woods on our shoot is being taken over by the stuff is there any spray or other way of stopping it don't want to loose all the bluebells etc.

  2. #2
    Japanese Knotweed or Himalayan Balsam?

    Doesn't matter which... both invasive species and both virtually impossible to erradicate. We have both on our farm and neither respond to weedkiller, the only way to completely get rid is to dig it up before the seeds disperse and burn it.

    I actually think the Balsam looks nice, it's like bamboo with pinky purple flowers and bee's love it.
    "It's halfway down the hill, directly below that tree next to a rock that looks like a bell-end"

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  3. #3
    Himalayan balsam does respond to weedkiller- graze on is the easiest to get hold of, and it really knocks it back properly. The seeds are viable for 2ish years, so you will need to eradicate every plant for 3 years to get rid of it- and even then you won't of got it all.
    Knotweed is a nightmare. Inject the base of the stem with pure roundup or similar is your best chance, but even then it's only successful 50-60% of the time.
    The only real way to get rid of knotweed is to remove it and all the soil around it and Chuck the lot in an incinerator. But that is bloody expensive!

  4. #4
    got name wrong it is Himalayan balsam

    Graze on sounds good will leave some grass!

  5. #5
    Bees do love the balsam but the honey that comes off it is black like toffee treacle

  6. #6
    We have a soil remediation division at work who sometimes deal with knotweed... I believe you can use weed killer but you have to inject it directly into the stems which is obviously pretty labour intensive. They use commercial grade roundup I think.

    We had one site where, because it was an earthworks site and was being dug up anyway, they opted to bury it. I think it had to be 10+ metres deep to prevent the shoots from ever reaching the surface. That's a pretty big hole!

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by csl View Post
    We have a soil remediation division at work who sometimes deal with knotweed... I believe you can use weed killer but you have to inject it directly into the stems which is obviously pretty labour intensive. They use commercial grade roundup I think.

    We had one site where, because it was an earthworks site and was being dug up anyway, they opted to bury it. I think it had to be 10+ metres deep to prevent the shoots from ever reaching the surface. That's a pretty big hole!
    Whoo that is some tenacious plant
    pity deer don't like it(or do they)
    Last edited by roedeerred; 27-04-2014 at 16:58.

  8. #8
    Its a **** to get rid off. Its normally found next to running water. Seeds fall into water then are carried down stream. The Till where I fish for Sea Trout and the Teifi at Newcastle Emlyn are having a real struggle getting it into check. The use of chemicals due to the water course is very limiting aswell.


    Nutty

  9. #9
    Balsam, spray it with any Glyphosate ( round up, barbarian, etc,etc) while the seed pods are immature, usually takes two treatments, but it is not hard to get rid of. Cattle will also eat it.


    Jap Knotweed can either be treated by direct injection of about 1ml glyphosate concentrate into the stem in the second section above ground, or if you can get there early in the year, wait till the plants are about 6 inches tall with two leaves and spray with glyphosate. If you have missed the early stages of growth, cut it down, rake it up and put it in a pile on some polythene and let it rot, when the stumps sprout, just spray the new growth as I said earlier. Knotweed treatment can take up to 4 years per plot and has to be monitored on a regular basis. Knotweed in Britain does not produce any viable seeds even though it will flower, so if it turns up on your land, it usually means that it has been brought in amongst soil or spoil material. It only need a quarter inch section of root to start from.

  10. #10
    SD Regular teyhan1's Avatar
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    Japanese Knotweed is indeed difficult to get rid of, but it can be done as I had some. It has taken me 3 years though.
    You also have to remember that it is a controlled substance so removing it from your site without the relevant permission can land you in a heap of trouble.
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