Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13

Thread: Valuable Lesson learned

  1. #1

    Valuable Lesson learned

    I decided to go out the other night for a stalk without my dog!! Don't know why I decided to do this but hindsight is a wonderful thing. (Possibly thinking that a hill stalk won't require a dog)



    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	image.jpg 
Views:	150 
Size:	537.3 KB 
ID:	42406


    Now from what you can see shot was taken from rifle point to just above the strip of heather to the left, perfect shot or so I thought beast seemed to drop on the spot, waited then went for the follow up, no drama as I had marked the shot with the terrain. On walking up the light was still good but photo shows fading light, this is where the cardinal rule was broken, (no dog) I must have been slightly right to where the buck had dropped as there was no sign as I approached, heather in this area is pretty long and straggly so thorough investigation required, with me still very confident that I was in exactly the correct spot, light was now fading and head torch donned making my way to the thick forestry, now with doubt setting in on the actual shot placement. I decided to track my way back to the original spot and continue looking for the buck (still to much to the right of the actual spot) for some considerable time until I had to give up.

    (What I learned during the search is dull to fading light plays tricks on where you actually think you should be looking)

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	image.jpg 
Views:	180 
Size:	754.8 KB 
ID:	42407


    The next morning I was up and out on the hill with three cockers in tow at 5am. With the train of thought now, that the buck must have made it to the forestry, (now my cockers are predominantly picking up dogs but can also track a fresh shot deer no problem, however by no means scent dogs) so I combed a stretch of the forestry edge in 30ft +/- with the dogs without success, still saying to myself there is no way he could/should have made it over the fence to the forestry. So I walked back over to well above the area that he could/should be in and started covering the ground again!! with the successful end result of a buck tucked in under the heather probably exactly where he dropped, as the shot was in behind the leg but strangely enough exit wound was out the neck. (Prob a combination of deflection and angle)

    Learning from this is never leave without your dog, never underestimate the task of looking for a beast even when out on ground you think you will find something no problem. And last but not least fading light plays tricks on your mind with regards ground terrain.


    George.

  2. #2
    Thanks George for sharing that story!!!
    All the best ,
    Ray.

  3. #3
    well done george,atb doug,
    DONT START

  4. #4
    Towards the end of last season I shot a roe doe in an open field at about 150m. I too was very happy with the shot and she only ran a few paces before dropping. The field was rough wild grass, short but with pale tufts. The doe was with a buck but it did not want to leave so I sat and watched him for a while. I sat for a little too long and it was getting dark so I ambled over full of confidence with the head torch only to keep mistaking the tufts for the body of the doe. As there was no other landmarks in the field all I could do is walk back to the place of taking the shot and walk on a bearing to the point. I eventually found her but it was nearing the point where I would have had to call a friend (and tell him I had lost a deer in an open field) , I would not have lived it down. My dog is getting on a bit and easily injures himself now so unfortunately doesn't come out very often.

  5. #5
    That is exactly what I thought, although not in a field I was still very confident in walking straight up to him also, but had to give up due to darkness and me getting more confused of the terrain. (Even though I know it very well) But at least it all came good in the end.


    George.

  6. #6
    Good write up! I had a moment a couple of years ago in Scotland. Shot a sika stag on lower ground at about 150 yards which I saw drop within a few strides. The terrain was extremely rough, up and down and filled with bracken, heather and pine and birch saplings everywhere. I took a mark on a small pine tree which looked like it was right behind where I saw him drop and started to descend to him but the problem was that firstly the terrain was so rough it was impossible to go straight and secondly as I got lower I kept losing sight of my mark and when it came into view again there were multiple trees!

    It took 3 attempts climbing back up to where I took the shot and starting again before I realised that my marker tree was actually a number of trees lined up and when off to one side one tree became a line of many going back another 50 yards!

    Just shows the value of taking a good mark, preferably using a third point if possible!

    Gralloch was performed under torchlight
    Last edited by csl; 24-05-2014 at 19:29.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by csl View Post
    Good write up! I had a moment a couple of years ago in Scotland. Shot a sika stag on lower ground at about 150 yards which I saw drop within a few strides. The terrain was extremely rough, up and down and filled with bracken, heather and pine and birch saplings everywhere. I took a mark on a small pine tree which looked like it was right behind where I saw him drop and started to descend to him but the problem was that firstly the terrain was so rough it was impossible to go straight and secondly as I got lower I kept losing sight of my mark and when it came into view again there were multiple trees!

    It took 3 attempts climbing back up to where I took the shot and starting again before I realised that my marker tree was actually a number of trees lined up and when off to one side one tree became many and going back at another 50 yards!

    Just shows the value of taking a good mark, preferably using a third point if possible!

    In the photo the ground looks fine, but as you go up to where the heather starts, the ground starts undulating a little, so that is where I also lost my mark coupled up with long heather is was very testing to say the least.

    George.

  8. #8
    It doesn't take much scrub/brush/grass etc to swallow up a deer does it. Quite disconcerting when you're sure it's there somewhere but you just can't see it. In NZ where the forest is thick I sometimes put some white loo paper at the shooting position so it can be located when you are where you think the animal should be - helps with locating.
    Cheers,
    Hewie

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Kiwi hunter View Post
    It doesn't take much scrub/brush/grass etc to swallow up a deer does it. Quite disconcerting when you're sure it's there somewhere but you just can't see it. In NZ where the forest is thick I sometimes put some white loo paper at the shooting position so it can be located when you are where you think the animal should be - helps with locating.
    Cheers,
    Hewie

    Pretty good idea thanks, I always take a photo of shooting position before walking up, but doesn't always help matters.

    George.

  10. #10
    I am often surprised how hard a fox can be to find after being shot in the lamp even in short grass

Similar Threads

  1. Lesson learned hopefully
    By Wingy in forum Deer Stalking General
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 02-10-2012, 10:13
  2. lesson learned
    By ziggy in forum Cleaning, Gunsmithing and Equipment Care
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 03-06-2012, 21:21
  3. OK learned members try these for an ID
    By johngryphon in forum Deer Stalking General
    Replies: 35
    Last Post: 24-02-2012, 08:21
  4. Lessons learned
    By LW_Norfolk in forum Deer Stalking General
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 21-03-2011, 21:03
  5. lessons learned
    By inversanda in forum Deer Stalking General
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 06-12-2010, 22:04

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •