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Thread: D-Day documentaries

  1. #1

    D-Day documentaries

    Two friends alerted me to long, multi-part documentaries on D-Day.

    One is running on public television here, so you in the UK may not be able to see it. It has lots of interviews with veterans done 15 and 20 years ago, woven in with film of the places and moments they discuss, right down to taking out an 88mm cannon or pillbox.

    D-DAY: THE PRICE OF FREEDOM | American Public Television

    The other is on The History Channel, and is available as a set of DVDs and as streaming video over the Internet.
    There is also one I have not seen on WWI, with lot of coverage of The Somme.

    D-Day - World War II - HISTORY.com

  2. #2
    A few years ago I was taken over there by a Veteran and given a good briefing on his experiences during the landing.
    We visited all the beaches and cemetaries and even met a Frenchman that helped Stan when he landed.
    It was quite an eye opener and would not like to go through even a fraction of what those guys went through.
    I watched the film that was put on detailing the action, both the English and German versions, it was hard to believe what took place.
    I served in Germany and saw Belson and spoke to a few German veterans during my time there but even with an idea of what went on, nothing gave me any idea of what that landing must have been like.
    I reckon everybody of the younger generation ought to be shown the Cemetaries and made to read some of the headstones, paying particular attention to the ages of the fallen.
    Without seeing the place and hearing the stories, it is hard to imagine what took place.
    Let's hope such a thing isn't neccessary again.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by EMcC View Post
    A few years ago I was taken over there by a Veteran and given a good briefing on his experiences during the landing.
    We visited all the beaches and cemetaries and even met a Frenchman that helped Stan when he landed.
    It was quite an eye opener and would not like to go through even a fraction of what those guys went through.
    I watched the film that was put on detailing the action, both the English and German versions, it was hard to believe what took place.
    I served in Germany and saw Belson and spoke to a few German veterans during my time there but even with an idea of what went on, nothing gave me any idea of what that landing must have been like.
    I reckon everybody of the younger generation ought to be shown the Cemetaries and made to read some of the headstones, paying particular attention to the ages of the fallen.
    Without seeing the place and hearing the stories, it is hard to imagine what took place.
    Let's hope such a thing isn't neccessary again.
    +1 EMcC! Schools should be made to send kids there on field trips, not ski trips and such... Ive been a number of times to the D Day beaches and to many other Cemetaries around europe with friends from a military vehicle club, the American Cemetery in Bastogne was particularly poignant.

    A Cemetery that I will also not ever forget is the one close to the bridge over the river Kwai and the visitor center there! I had a tear in my eye the whole time I was there very emotional... There is a new film out called the Railway Man obviously based on the book, I can highly recomend it, brings it very close to home!

  4. #4
    I saw in a local paper that 22 former USGIs who landed during Operation Overload are flying over to England for the 70th anniversary, in a group with lots of escorts and helpers.

    There is group called, "Honor Flight", started by two businessmen in Hendersonville, North Carolina, to fly veterans of WWII and Korea to Washington, D.C., to visit the memorials there. It spread to chapters all over the United States, and now there is fundraising to send the few remaining survivors to England this week and next for D-Day 70.

  5. #5

  6. #6
    images of normandy: Welcome

    Some poigniant pics here taken by my good friend @ https://www.facebook.com/pages/Houes...16088951736972

    Quote from Mike & T: 'All 3 Veterans now arrived...tomorrow get into place to watch the 13 Dakotas fly over Carentan with 250 parachutists dropping & then after that take the 3 veterans to our village Mayor where he is honouring them with a reception and they are to be awarded with the Normandy Medal...'
    Last edited by deeangeo; 04-06-2014 at 06:47.
    Blaser K95 Luxus Kipplaufbüchse .25-06Rem. Zeiss 8x56, 110gn Nosler Accubond = Game Over!

  7. #7
    National D-Day Monument

    This memorial, just opened in 2014, was built with private funds, on 88 acres outside the small town of Bedford, Virginia. It was the initiative of a few private citizens who thought this town, which lost 22 young men on D-Day, was the fitting place to honor all those who participated.

    June 6, 1944: Nineteen boys from Bedford, Virginia--population just 3,000 in 1944--died in the first bloody minutes of D-Day. They were part of Company A of the 116th Regiment of the 29th Division, and the first wave of American soldiers to hit the beaches in Normandy. Later in the campaign, three more boys from this small Virginia town died of gunshot wounds. Twenty-two sons of Bedford lost--it is a story one cannot easily forget and one that the families of Bedford will never forget.

    They knew these men were involved in the invasion, but there was no word of the casualties until about six weeks later, when the telegraph office opened and the telegrams to the families began coming, in a continuous stream.

    http://www.dday.org/


  8. #8
    This 90 minute documentary is on YouTube. Has lots of re-enactment film, which I can do without, but also has lots of non-battle scenes of testing Higgins boats, inflatable truck and tanks to full enemy planes, training scenes, which you will not see in the battle documentaries.


  9. #9
    Color film of D-Day.
    Private film by George Stevens, on the HMS Belfast.

    Color Footage Offers Rare Insight into D-Day Invasion


    Rare D-Day Color Film - Part 1 | Military.com

  10. #10
    Just seen this thread guys.. I've been researching my uncles career in the RAFVR during WW2, he served with 605 sqdn on D Day, piloting Mosquitos. Him and two other aircraft were tasked with attacking AA guns, searchlights and emplacements on 6th June...he was over the Caen area at 0010 hrs on 6th, and was credited with dropping the first bomb of the 2nd front...
    Here's a copy of his logbook page from that momentous day...have a wee read, its amazing.. Him and his observer and great friend, Roy Philips were killed on 26th June , the craft broke up over Margate...


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