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Thread: Exit Hole

  1. #1

    Exit Hole

    This Roe was shot on Saturday by a client, just off broadside slightly facing towards us at about 60 yards, 100 Grain RWS Soft Nosed .243...

    The exit as the picture shows was about 3" x 4" removing 4 sections of Rib Bone...

    The entry has only just clipped the entry rib rather than smashing straight through if that had been the case this would have been slightly more explainable... The bullet also hadn't changed direction as entry and exit aligned as to be expected...

    The diaphragm, liver, spleen and intestine also exited with the bullet, I'm assuming due to suction as the bullets force pulled through...

    Anyone seen this before... It just seems odd that the entry rib was only clipped and this happened otherwise i would not be so intrigued...




    Alex

  2. #2
    Ahhh Alex,

    Yes very similar but a different calibre and bullet. It happened to me on my very first Roe, a Doe taken in Feburary quite a few years ago. Shot was from a high seat taken at about 90 yards. Rifle was a Brno ZKK 601 in .308 and the load was a Sierra 180 Grn Pro Hunter #2150 over 42.0 Grains of Reloader 15 with WLR primer in a surplus OFV case.

    The bullet hit a rib going in and took out 3 ribs coming out and some of the intensines were hanging out of the exit wound. I did not use the Sierra bullets for a long time as I also found bits of core and jacket inside the chest cavity indicating that the bullet came apart.

  3. #3

    Hydrolic Shock

    Alex

    The reason for the gut exiting is hydrolic shock, this can also happen on the impact area which seems stupid, but its caused by a fast moving round hitting the deer & causing a vaccum which the guts & tissue fill on either impact or exit-all very nasty in anycase.

    I would say that the large exit hole is just hitting ribs with an already expanded bullet.

    Some people think the 243 being the entry level calibre leaves little holes, in real terms it does not I assure you, we are processing 20+ deer a week & many have been 243'ed through the shoulder.

    It is a small bullet but hits hard & fast leaving much more damage than many larger calibers.

    Regs Lee

  4. #4
    Bet it didn't run far

  5. #5
    Thanks Lee & Brithunter...

    Your explanations certainly make sense...

    Paul no it didn't run very far but actually took about 15 seconds to drop its head from a bolt up right position almost like it was back shot...

    I was just about to suggest a follow up shot to make sure when it finally rested...

    Alex

  6. #6

    Re: Hydrolic Shock

    Quote Originally Posted by lwcdart
    Some people think the 243 being the entry level calibre leaves little holes, in real terms it does not I assure you, we are processing 20+ deer a week & many have been 243'ed through the shoulder.

    It is a small bullet but hits hard & fast leaving much more damage than many larger calibers.

    Regs Lee
    Could not agree more!!

  7. #7
    I only have experience of red roe and fallow , the roe no matter what calibre , bullet weight powder etc always seems to end up with the most damage. I have seen similar damage from my own .243" on roe but in 20 years only once or twice.
    There is a link(youtube?) on a post to bullets passing through ballistic jelly somewhere on the site, i found it quite interesting.
    Unless you get more problems i would say stick with what you are using so long as you have confidence in them.

  8. #8
    i gralloched 2 roe and 1 fallow with 125gn ballistic tips winter 2009 - whipped the lot out clean, didnt even bust the rumen!

  9. #9
    Cervushunter...

    The client who uses them has used them on Roe and Red never had a problem and have always been very effective...

    In the end of the day I'm not the slightest bit concerned by this because i would prefer a bigger hole than a smaller one if it means the animal is down quicker...

    A dead cull deer makes me happy... Exit hole size is less of a concern...

  10. #10
    Bullets do behave oddly sometimes! One might think this would be commoner with quick, light ones at close range, but even bigger slower ones have their moments. There are so many variables.

    You can't make an omlette without breaking eggs, though, and as you say, too much hole is better than not enough.

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