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Thread: Shooting slings

  1. #1

    Shooting slings

    I have a double American military type shooting sling on the 22rf. Some old business cards (my previous employer who made us all redundant last year) a lots old 22rf odds and sods. 50 yds and once had remembered how to use it was putting 10rd mag dulls straight into one business card. Bit more tricky of knees in a sitting position but amazing how much support a sling does give. Used one in the past target shooting, but think it might be used again in anger on rabbits.

  2. #2
    I use them on most of my hunting rifles , except for the ones that have a barrel mounted sling swivel . When they're set up properly they are amazingly steady . That's probably why I don't own a bipod .

    AB

  3. #3
    The M1907 or lighter 2-piece derivative Charles Whelen leather slings really work for quickly bracing the rifle in all positions. They can be wide, relatively heavy, and bulky. The Brownell's Latigo is even lighter.

    A lot of hunters have made their own using nylon webbing with quickie nylon adjustment buckles and QD attachments at both ends. Now there are several being marketed.

    Tactical Intervention Specialities Slip Cuff
    Tab Gear
    Triad Tactical Mountain Shooter Sling

    Here is a good look at the modern slings in all four shooting positions.
    Shooting Voodoo :: Sling, More Than a Carry Strap

    I have not used any of these nylon slings. I have used others, and made my own, but I like the way leather grips my clothing. I have one of belting leather with pigskin suede backing which really sticks to my shoulder and to my arm in a cuff to steady the rifle.

    The sling on a barrel band is usually on a hard-kicking rifle for dangerous game, where you grip the fore end far out like a shotgun to point the muzzle at the game as you mount it into your shoulder, from offhand, and perhaps a bit off-balance. The swivel on the barrel not only keeps it out of the way of your hand, but permits carrying a full length rifle lower on your shoulder, with the muzzle below your head, where it is less likely to catch on limbs and brush.

    If you are going to use a sling to brace the rifle, it is going to put some force on the stock. You need strong fittings which can swivel freely, so you are only pulling against the screws, and not twisting them, as well.
    Last edited by Southern; 08-07-2014 at 22:35.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Southern View Post
    The M1907 or lighter 2-piece derivative Charles Whelen leather slings really work for quickly bracing the rifle in all positions. They can be wide, relatively heavy, and bulky. The Brownell's Latigo is even lighter.

    A lot of hunters have made their own using nylon webbing with quickie nylon adjustment buckles and QD attachments at both ends. Now there are several being marketed.

    Tactical Intervention Specialities Slip Cuff
    Tab Gear
    Triad Tactical Mountain Shooter Sling

    Here is a good look at the modern slings in all four shooting positions.
    Shooting Voodoo :: Sling, More Than a Carry Strap

    I have not used any of these nylon slings. I have used others, and made my own, but I like the way leather grips my clothing. I have one of belting leather with pigskin suede backing which really sticks to my shoulder and to my arm in a cuff to steady the rifle.

    The sling on a barrel band is usually on a hard-kicking rifle for dangerous game, where you grip the fore end far out like a shotgun to point the muzzle at the game as you mount it into your shoulder, from offhand, and perhaps a bit off-balance. The swivel on the barrel not only keeps it out of the way of your hand, but permits carrying a full length rifle lower on your shoulder, with the muzzle below your head, where it is less likely to catch on limbs and brush.

    If you are going to use a sling to brace the rifle, it is going to put some force on the stock. You need strong fittings which can swivel freely, so you are only pulling against the screws, and not twisting them, as well.

    Yup

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Southern View Post
    The M1907 or lighter 2-piece derivative Charles Whelen leather slings really work for quickly bracing the rifle in all positions. They can be wide, relatively heavy, and bulky. The Brownell's Latigo is even lighter.

    A lot of hunters have made their own using nylon webbing with quickie nylon adjustment buckles and QD attachments at both ends. Now there are several being marketed.

    Tactical Intervention Specialities Slip Cuff
    Tab Gear
    Triad Tactical Mountain Shooter Sling

    Here is a good look at the modern slings in all four shooting positions.
    Shooting Voodoo :: Sling, More Than a Carry Strap

    I have not used any of these nylon slings. I have used others, and made my own, but I like the way leather grips my clothing. I have one of belting leather with pigskin suede backing which really sticks to my shoulder and to my arm in a cuff to steady the rifle.

    The sling on a barrel band is usually on a hard-kicking rifle for dangerous game, where you grip the fore end far out like a shotgun to point the muzzle at the game as you mount it into your shoulder, from offhand, and perhaps a bit off-balance. The swivel on the barrel not only keeps it out of the way of your hand, but permits carrying a full length rifle lower on your shoulder, with the muzzle below your head, where it is less likely to catch on limbs and brush.

    If you are going to use a sling to brace the rifle, it is going to put some force on the stock. You need strong fittings which can swivel freely, so you are only pulling against the screws, and not twisting them, as well.
    The last point is a good one as the force that can be applied between stock and sling has been known to split a slender forend and uproot a QD stud!

    If you don't want a rattling swivel ensure you 'set' a fixed forend stud at an angle that compliments the way the sling sits when you are wound into it.

    K

  6. #6
    British sporting rifles always used to have the eye/front sling loop on the barrel. The sling had big Q/D clasps so it could be removed quickly in brush for say a follow up where the sling might snag on the brush.







    Note the sprung dog lead type clips on the period leather sling. On this sling even the buckle is covered in formed stiched leather which was the norm at the time.









    This was the norm for serious hunting rifles:_



    DWM manufactured Mauser 93 in 7x57 made for the Boers in about 1897.

    Husqvarna also put the front sling loop on the barrel:-



    Model 46 of 1935 vintage.

    These rifles were built to hunt with and be carried. As mentioned the front sling mount further forwards place the muzzle lower when on the shoulder for carry.

  7. #7
    I also got a friend in the US to get and send me a couple of new 1907 US leather slings. One is fitted the the 303 BSA model "E" which also has a Redfield sportign aperture rear sight fitted now.





    In fact I acquired a couple of these NIB and some Lyman 57SME sporting aperture sights.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Brithunter View Post






    The above arrangement is fine on the range but in the field would frustrate me greatly! Its why I prefer to get the stud position set solid in forend at the correct offset angle and then install no rattle UM swivels as per below example. For extra rattle-free insurance I tightly stitch swivels into each end of a sling. In fact it was my total dissatisfaction with the quality and type of sling available that ensured I signed up for a handsewn leather working course at Cordwainers College to permit indulging my passion for "over engineering"!

    K




  9. #9
    Nice bit of work Klenchblaize, very nice indeed.
    It's the calibre of the shooter that counts not the calibre of the rifle.

  10. #10
    Nice sling, Klenchblaize! What fun to make your own sling, knife sheath, or arrow quiver.

    Brithunter, what is that rifle on the grass? I have one almost exactly like it, a Mauser 98 in 8x60S.

    Hang on to those vintage, all-steel Redfield and Lyman sights. They are like gold. I am fitting a Lyman 57 to a 1903A3 sporting rifle now. I even have one on my relatively modern 1967 Remington 700 .30-06, the first rifle I bought new. A Merit Sight Disc, with its adjustable iris, is the trick for old eyes and changing light.

    I find old vintage slings at gun shows, discarded in favor of some camo and foam sling... their loss, my gain.

    Keep those pictures coming.
    Here is an old school quick detach sling fitting - a spring steel hook by Parker Hale. Light and simple.
    Attachment 44292
    And here is the leather sling from a 1970s HK-91, with its hook for the eye on the left of the front sight. The rear of the sling is still the 1905 pattern button to form just a leather loop.
    Attachment 44291
    One thing to be aware of is that older rifles had different size holes in the eyes, and German rifles had different than English, but you can still get the proper swivels which fit just so, with no rattle. I will look up the sizes and some suppliers in my notebook this weekend.

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